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  • Books: When Murder Ruled Chicago

    Michael Lesy’s “Murder City” is a creepy book. Fascinating, but creepy. Lesy (“Wisconsin Death Trip”) focuses on Windy City murders in the ’20s, a time and place we all think we know: Capone, Leopold and Loeb, “Chicago”—merely drop the city’s name and people start thinking Tommy guns and bathtub gin. Lesy takes his time getting to the notorious gangsters. Most of the perps and victims are people you’ve never heard of: a man who killed his wife because he wanted to go back into the Army, a man who killed two men for a Packard, lots of spurned lovers. They add up—but to what? Something strangely depressing: by 1924, Chicago had a homicide rate 24 percent higher than the national average, and it was choked by a culture compounded by gangsterism, corruption and rat-a-tat-tat headlines. Lesy dissipates the romance of the roaring ’20s before his book is half over, certainly well before we encounter the women who inspired the winking cynicism of “Chicago.” What sticks with you about that...
  • Music: Amy Winehouse Tears Off the Roof

    She's only 23, but Britain's Amy Winehouse sings with all the pain—and power—of Judy Garland and Billie Holiday. Talent this big can't be rehabbed.Amy Winehouse is an odd musical spectacle. She's a skinny, 23-year-old British girl who looks like she should be cooing ephemeral pop tunes, but instead, belts out deep, resonant numbers as though she's possessed by Etta James, Lauryn Hill and Judy Garland. It reminds me of those creepy moments on "Star Search" when a preschooler would practically bleed Whitney Houston, even though the only pain she'd felt came from diaper rash.Winehouse has become known in England for her ability to riff about modern-day life atop 1950s-style soul and doo wop. She's a true blues and jazz crooner, but unlike Norah Jones, Winehouse possesses a punk-rock attitude. "Rehab," the quirky first single off her second album, "Back to Black," recounts the time when her management staged an intervention to get her off the booze: "They tried to make me go to rehab...
  • Mean Greeks: DePauw's Sorority Scandal

    With membership declining, and the sorority acquiring a campus rep for being more brainy than beautiful, the national officers of Delta Zeta embarked on a fall recruiting effort for their DePauw University chapter in Greencastle, Ind. But instead of adding members, they wound up effectively asking 23 of the existing 35 members to leave. Outraged sorority sisters at the liberal arts school said those dumped were the women considered overweight or unattractive. DZ officials say that isn’t so. Cindy Menges, national executive director of Delta Zeta, says that the only factor in determining who would stay was a commitment to recruit for the chapter. "Any allegations otherwise are false," she said in a statement.The incident has sparked an uproar both on and off the campus. Six sorority members who were not ousted quit anyway to show solidarity with the sisters who received the letters telling them to vacate their sorority house rooms by Jan. 29. The university administration also...
  • Eat, Drink, Man, Woman (And Child)

    When my husband, Ken, and I were planning our wedding two years ago, we toiled over the menu even more than most anxious couples. As a Jewish vegan who doesn't eat meat, poultry, fish or dairy products, I wanted to share vegan delicacies without feeling I was pushing an agenda. My Chinese-Japanese-Hawaiian husband wanted to be sure his relatives would have enough to eat, and to incorporate Chinese banquet foods.In the end, our caterer served a gorgeous organic vegan meal, complete with Chinese long noodles (representing long life). We added line-caught wild fish, served whole to symbolize abundance and good fortune (in Chinese and Hawaiian tradition). After a Jewish blessing over wine and challah, Ken worked the room, teaching people to extract and eat the fish delicacies: the eyes and cheeks.I became a vegetarian as a teenager, with the mixed motivation of loving animals and wishing to confound (and inconvenience) my meat-eating parents. Then, five years ago, I became a vegan....
  • Newsmakers Quiz: How Well Do You Know ... 'The O. C.'?

    Has a hit show ever fizzled as fast as "The O.C."? The series ends this week, so let's reminisce. More questions at Xtra.NEWSWEEK.com. What didn't happen to Marissa during the series? a. She had sex with Ryan.b. She entered rehab.c. She became a lesbian.d. She died in a car crash.ANSWER: B.
  • India, In A New Light

    Suddenly, India is on everyone's mind. Hardly a day passes without some public discussion about jobs being outsourced there, the growing shortage of hotel rooms in Bangalore, Indian firms seeking to buy European competitors or an Indian novelist who has snapped up a hefty advance from an American publisher. Yet less than 20 years ago, the few stories about India published in major Western outlets were bemoaning its economic woes, diplomatic isolation and political turmoil. Indeed, some latter-day Cassandras were predicting its imminent dissolution, conjuring for India the same fate that had engulfed the other large-scale multiethnic experiments in the Soviet Union and Yugoslavia. Not only has India defied these dire predictions, it is poised on the brink of major power status.Edward Luce goes a long way toward explaining India's almost inexhaustible resilience in his knowledgeable, witty and sympathetic account, "In Spite of the Gods: The Strange Rise of Modern India" ( 383 pages....
  • Newsmakers: Howard Stern Vs. Howard Stern

    As if one annoying Howard Stern wasn't bad enough, now there's two. Even the Sterns can't stand it. Howard Stern (the radio one) wants to change his name to "The Howard" so he's not confused with Howard K. Stern (the Anna Nicole one). That's one way to tell them apart. But we found other differences, too. ...
  • The Cat (and Hat) That Came to Stay

    If you were to approach 100 people on the street and ask each one to recite from any narrative poem, the odds are that maybe one of them could get off a few lines of "Hiawatha" or "The Raven." But if you were to suggest that they could include the works of Theodore Geisel, a.k.a. Dr. Seuss, the chances are that most born after 1950--or everyone with children--could get off not just a few lines but perhaps whole book-length poems. He is, without doubt, the best-known American narrative poet of the last half of the 20th century. And not just best-known: he's one of the best.In "The Annotated Cat: Under the Hats of Seuss and His Cats," Philip Nel helps us understand just why Dr. Seuss has captured the imaginations of several generations of readers--and their parents. Nel's line-by-line analyses and explanations illuminate precisely how Seuss created his masterwork. We are treated to rough sketches and first drafts. We see the Cat's antecedents, especially the Katzenjammer Kids, Krazy...
  • Scene Stealer

    Any casual observer of art knows that just as Claude Monet made his name painting ethereal, color-rich landscapes, his great friend and contemporary Pierre-Auguste Renoir excelled at the spirited depictions of people. In "The Luncheon of the Boating Party" (1881), with its strong strokes and brash impasto, the patrons of a lakeside brasserie are caught in postlunch bliss. It was Renoir's ability to capture the essence of a moment among the varying strata of French society--from young girls with satin bows in their hair and couples dancing to circus jugglers and nomadic Arabs--that made him one of the most beloved impressionists of the era.Yet Renoir also produced a vast collection of lesser-known landscapes. During the first two decades of his long career, the artist experimented with the genre's form and flow, which later informed his technique. Now an exhibition at London's National Gallery brings together for the first time 70 of these scene paintings. "Renoir Landscapes"--until...
  • Newsmakers Q&A: Celine Dion

    She's leaving Las Vegas to sing at the Oscars, but Dion took time to chat with Ramin Setoodeh.Oh, I'm not sure about that. I've been to the Oscars five times.It was definitely very different. For me, it was glamorous. A lot of people hated it.Of course not. This year, my husband, Rene, is going to wear the white hat.The first year, I did 200 shows, five nights a week. I couldn't talk to my husband or son. Two days of taking a break vocally.I don't talk at all. My husband and I communicate on the phone without me talking. [ She starts tapping the phone .] Did you hear that? How many hits mean different things. One means yes, two means no. But I'm not going to tell you all our secret things.I finish the show at 10:30 at night. By the time I take a shower, I have my little snack, I do my drive back home, I never arrive before midnight. I love to sleep late. I can go to bed at 5 a.m. and wake up at 2 p.m.Actually, my 6-year-old son has the same hours as us. Isn't that amazing?He's home...
  • Why Tv Is Better Than The Movies

    Denis Leary remembers the exact moment when all his notions about what television could be got blown to smithereens. It came during the first season of "The Sopranos." "It was the episode where Tony Soprano is driving Meadow to visit colleges and he runs into the snitch along the way," says Leary, the star and co-creator of FX's firefighter dramedy "Rescue Me." Tony (James Gandolfini) happens upon the turncoat, who'd been placed in witness protection, at a gas station on some leafy country road. The next day, after dropping off his daughter for a campus interview, Tony tracks down the snitch and brutally strangles him to death with a coil of wire. "I remember watching that and thinking, 'Oh, my God ... '," Leary says. "I don't think I blinked that entire episode. The show ended at 10 o'clock, and at 10:05 the phone in my apartment started ringing off the hook. That's when I thought, 'If they can do this , you can do anything in this format'."For other people, maybe it was another...
  • Mail Call: Royal For France?

    Readers of our year-end report on Ségolène Royal were skeptical of her success. One doubted that she could overcome France's challenges: "Joblessness, poverty, homelessness and corruption are all up." Observed another, "substance is second to media savvy and razzmatazz."Your Dec. 25, 2006/Jan. 1, 2007, article "Failed Expectations" says that the Republic of Korea lacks "strong commitment to due process, rule of law or the fundamental rules of democracy ... " This outrageous allegation overlooks how long and courageously Korea has fought to achieve an exemplary democracy. Your writers say that South Korean President Roh Moo Hyun "waffled on the region's gravest security threat: North Korea's nuclear breakout." This is not true. President Roh sternly condemned North Korea's nuclear test as a serious development undermining the region's peace and stability. He said that Pyongyang is solely responsible for all the consequences of that incident. Our government's policy on the North...
  • Men and Depression: New Treatments

    For nearly a decade, while serving as an elected official and working as an attorney, Massachusetts state Sen. Bob Antonioni struggled with depression, although he didn't know it. Most days, he attended Senate meetings and appeared on behalf of clients at the courthouse. But privately, he was irritable and short-tempered, ruminating endlessly over his cases and becoming easily frustrated by small things, like deciding which TV show to watch with his girlfriend. After a morning at the state house, he'd be so exhausted by noon that he'd drive home and collapse on the couch, unable to move for the rest of the day.When his younger brother, who was similarly moody, killed himself in 1999, Antonioni, then 40, decided to seek help. For three years, he clandestinely saw a therapist, paying in cash so there would be no record. He took antidepressants, but had his prescriptions filled at a pharmacy 20 miles away. His depression was his burden, and his secret. He couldn't bear for his image to...
  • The Last Word: Henry Paulson

    He's been called the first treasury secretary with real clout since Bob Rubin, and arrived in office with the gilded pedigree that adorns former Goldman Sachs CEOs. So it's not surprising that Henry Paulson has since been fingered by pundits as the man behind George W. Bush's latest moves on issues ranging from China to, most recently, his call for a campaign to cut U.S. dependence on foreign oil. He spoke to NEWSWEEK's Richard Wolffe on his latest role last week. Excerpts: ...
  • Buzz for a Potential New Cancer Drug

    Scientists and patients are buzzing about DCA, an existing drug newly recognized as a potentially powerful cancer treatment. But, of course, more research is needed.
  • Good Spy Vs. Bad Spy

    Things are not always as they seem. That was certainly the case with Robert Hanssen, the devout, graceless, buttoned-down FBI agent who, after 22 years of deception, was revealed to be one of the most treacherous spies working for the Soviets in U.S. history. It's also the case with "Breach," the movie about Hanssen's capture. The conventional wisdom is that any studio movie released in February is, by definition, a dog. But "Breach" is actually a wonderfully taut cat-and-mouse thriller. It features a performance by Chris Cooper, as the eccentric, contradictory Hanssen, that ought to be remembered as one of the year's best come December. Let's hope that awards voters have longer memories than usual.We know from the get-go that Hanssen's the guilty party: that's not the source of the suspense. The screenplay, written by director Billy Ray and the team of Adam Mazer and William Rotko, tells the story from the point of view of Eric O'Neill (Ryan Phillippe), a young, ambitious FBI agent...
  • A Life In Books: Nathan Englander

    While writing his upcoming novel, "The Ministry of Special Cases," Nathan Englander was wary of picking up any old book because he was afraid of messing up his own voice. Now that he's done, his nightstand is in danger of collapse. ...
  • Rattling His Chains

    There's no polite way to describe Craig Brewer's "Black Snake Moan," so let's get it over with. Samuel L. Jackson stars as Lazarus, an old black bluesman who tries to cure Rae (Christina Ricci) of nymphomania by tethering her to his radiator with a steel chain. Revolted? Intrigued? Amused? If you checked all of the above, Brewer would be delighted. His film "Hustle & Flow" got two Oscar nominations (and won for best song) in 2005, but it also kicked up a lot of criticism that the story of a black pimp didn't need to be told, especially by a white director."Moan" raises the stakes with both its reverse slave imagery and its disturbing depiction of sex addiction. "Having a white girl chained up at a black man's house, that definitely seems manipulative," says Carmen Van Kerckhove, president of the diversity-training firm New Demographic. Brewer understands how the film seems confrontational--that's the point. "Craig wanted this film to be provocative," says Jackson, "but it's a...
  • Rehab Reality Check

    The time is coming-- perhaps even within the decade--when doctors will treat alcoholism with a pill. As they improve their understanding of the biochemistry of addiction, researchers will find new ways to interrupt the neurological sequence that begins with pulling the tab on a can of beer and ends with sobbing on the phone to someone you dated twice in 1987. It will be a paradigm shift as profound as the one wrought by Prozac in the treatment of depression, says Dr. Mark Willenbring of the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism: people with drinking problems will get a modicum of counseling and prescriptions from their family doctors. This will be a great boon to most people except for athletes, congressmen and movie stars, who will lose one of the defining rites of passage of modern celebrity: the all-absolving, career-rejuvenating, Barbara Walters-placating ritual of checking into rehab.It has been a fixture of our culture since as far back as 1983, when Elizabeth...
  • Newsmakers Q&A: Nicolas Cage

    In "Ghost Rider," Nicolas Cage plays a motorcycle stuntman who gives his soul to the Devil. But first, he lent his ears to Nicki Gostin.I grew up reading them. It's one of the ways I learned how to read.No. But I kept all the "Ghost Rider" comics.It's the truth. I'm going to be completely truthful with you.The name stood for something I thought was good. It was a unique name. My wife wanted a unique name.Define the word, please.How was I kooky with Patricia?OK. I would say I'm more of a romantic. I wouldn't describe myself as kooky. I'd like you to use the word "romantic"--please!I had teeth removed that coincided with the movie I was making. I don't want you to think I'm completely--I mean, these are stories that get built up over time.You can use that word, yes. If you can find a way to spell it.She's the director, that's her business.No. And if you look at her movies, I don't think there would be any role I'm right for.Actually, that would be fascinating. It would be a stretch,...
  • Mail Call: Paying The Ultimate Price

    Readers were outspoken about Iraq and heartbroken by our cover story on the 12 American soldiers who lost their lives in a Black Hawk helicopter crash. "We need to be reminded every day what our soldiers and their families are suffering because of the foolhardy actions of our president," one said, while another added that "the death of or injuries to soldiers fighting for our country must never lose the power to shock. Details should never be blurred and we should never feel numb." But one saw such accounts as unpatriotic. "Iraq is a mess, but such reporting is aiding the enemy strategy by turning the American public against the war." Of the fallen, one said regretfully, "Our lost soldiers aren't faceless individuals who are mere tools for politicians and pundits. They are men and women who come from our big cities and our small towns who wanted to teach children, become actors, play professional sports or become scientists."I was deeply moved by your Feb. 5 cover story, "The True...
  • This Finn Is A Real Shark

    Finn," by first-time novelist Jon Clinch, seems like your usual standing-on-the-shoulders-of-giants contraption. Its main character is Huckleberry Finn's alcoholic father, who cuts such a scary figure in Mark Twain's novel. Clinch restages some of Twain's scenes, and, as he says in an author's note, fits his story "meticulously into and around Pap Finn's appearances ... in 'Adventures of Huckleberry Finn'." In fact, Clinch's found his "road map" for much of "Finn" in a single scene in Twain: Huck's discovery of his father's corpse among some creepy artifacts: a woman's clothing, cloth masks, an artificial leg and, in charcoal on the walls, "the ignorantest kind of words and pictures."You can find out for yourself just what Clinch has assembled from this Flannery O'Connor bric-a-brac. But his first six pages have a woman's corpse floating down the Mississippi and a blind man eating some sort of mysterious meat given to him by Pap, so it's fair to reveal that there's unpleasantness...
  • Tokyo Makes Waves

    Visitors to Roppongi, Tokyo's posh entertainment district, come for a taste of the latest trends in fashion, food and fun. But increasingly, the tree-lined neighborhood is offering up opportunities for more-highbrow culture: last month the dazzling new National Art Center, Tokyo--called the Big Wave--became the latest museum to open. The spectacular building, by the world-renowned architect Kisho Kurokawa, who also designed the Kuala Lumpur International Airport, uses thousands of sheets of glass to achieve a sense of fluid transparency. It features a 22-meter-high atrium and 14,000 square meters of exhibition space--more than any other museum in Japan--and is designed to be energy efficient, incorporating special glass to cut heat and recycling rainwater. "We now have a cutting-edge art center," says its director, Hideki Hayashida. "We believe it will play an important role as the new art spot."In keeping with its open, flowing structure, the administrators have taken the unusual-...
  • Fox Tries Funny

    Back when I lived in Atlanta, I spent my Sunday mornings with Ike Newkirk, host of "Open Line," one of the few liberal talk-radio shows on southern airwaves. Newkirk's format is simple: he opines on all things far-left (Diebold and Carlyle Group are among the frequently-used buzzwords), and callers either agree wholeheartedly or are treated to his wrath. While I didn't always agree with Newkirk's views, I always approved of his verbal pummeling. My favorite Newkirk exchange was with a caller who was fed up with the host's belly-aching over the outcome of the 2004 Presidential election:Caller: I'm sick and tired of hearing people talk about how Bush cheated. It doesn't matter now. We have to get past it, stop being sore losers and get behind our president.Newkirk: Sir, let me ask you something, did you vote?Caller: No, I didn't. I was busy moving.Newkirk: How long did it take you to move?Caller: About two weeks.Newkirk: Sir, you are an idiot.Caller: What? Why do we have to resort to...
  • Newsmakers: Let's Play ... Family Feud!!!

    The O'Neal clan is back in dysfunction junction. Ryan was arrested on assault charges last week after he fired a gun inside his home. He claims self-defense. Is that a good answer? Survey ... says?!? RYAN: Luckily, his gunshot didn't hit anything but the banister. He claims he was only trying to scare his older son. GRIFFIN: Ryan's son, 42, reportedly took several swings with a fireplace poker--aiming for Dad, but he hit his pregnant girlfriend in the face by mistake. Oops. REDMOND: How was the younger brother involved? One source claims Griffin smashed an ashtray on his head, prompting the whole fight ... TATUM: ... Or maybe not. Ryan's famous daughter issued a statement backing Griffin in the scuffle. FARRAH FAWCETT: Her role in all this? Ryan was at his ex's birthday party before the rumble.
  • Two Views Of London

    The scene is a London park in the mid-18th century. Bewigged figures make formal conversation in the foreground. In the distance, a company of soldiers is drilling in perfect formation. A line of handsome, classical buildings stretches across the backdrop. Order prevails. This is the capital of a prosperous country with big aspirations: the city as depicted by Canaletto, the great Venetian artist, during a decade-long stay in England.And now for something completely different: on a London side street within easy strolling distance of the park, a drunken and bare-breasted woman allows her baby to tumble from her arms. Just behind, a brawl is developing outside the distillery; the ramshackle houses are close to collapse. Sure, it's satire, but the detail screams of authentic knockabout city life. This is London as portrayed by William Hogarth, native British painter, printmaker, polemicist, patriot and occasional moralist.Two artists; two utterly different views of a city and a...
  • Mail Call: Prince, Not Leader

    Our year-end report on Rahul Gandhi led many readers to send in their own views on his ability as a future leader. One said, "A soft-spoken prince charming, he behaves like a foreign tourist." Wrote another, "It remains to be seen if he can emulate his father's leadership qualities."I found your Dec. 25, 2006-Jan. 1, 2007, cover story about Rahul Gandhi, a person who has achieved nothing in life apart from being born to a successful political family, an atrocious choice of subject ("India's Crown Prince"). I shudder to think of a nonachiever, a mediocre person like Gandhi, heading anything whatever; yet this is now a tormenting possibility. India's claim of successful democracy is nothing but a façade if such undeserving people come into the limelight. After all, meritocracy is the soul of democracy, and exorcising the demons of feudalism should be essential in a developing country.Bhupendra S. ManotKolkata, IndiaRahul Gandhi's legendary background has helped him have an edge over...
  • Dear Junk Mailers: Leave My Son Alone

    When his 18th birthday arrived, my son, Jacob, became awfully popular. The U.S. Navy wanted him. "Before you find your place in the world, maybe you should see it first," it urged. A local menswear shop offered him 50 percent off a tuxedo package for high-school graduation. And a razor company sent him a free razor, hoping, I suppose, to make a lifelong customer out of him. Their only miscalculation was that Jacob didn't shave. Nor was it likely that any of the armed forces would gain Jacob's services. And he certainly wouldn't graduate from high school. Jacob, you see, died in 1993. He was only 7 years old when a cancerous brain tumor stole him from us.As much as we loved Jacob, that period of our lives is still incredibly painful to remember. Yet, years after his death, letters addressed to Jacob find their way into our mailbox. Early on, I was driven almost to tears by these inducements for our son to attend a ritzy local private school or to sample a particular snack cake. I...
  • Reality Check

    Hollywood celebs with anorexia or bulimia get the headlines. But a new study from Harvard-affiliated McLean Hospital shows binge eating--eating beyond the "full" point at least twice a week--is more common than those two illnesses combined. 3.5% of women and 2% of men in the U.S. binge, compared with 0.9% of women with anorexia and 1.5% of women with bulimia. Scientists now call bingeing a "major" U.S. health problem.
  • Intimate Strangers

    The statue of liberty, in her curious way, helps tell the tale of America's long, complicated experiences and profoundly contradictory ambitions in the Middle East. The French sculptor Frédéric Bartholdi wanted to build a colossus bestriding the entrance to the newly opened Suez Canal in the 1870s. She would be veiled, like a peasant woman of the Nile, and would hold aloft her torch as "Egypt (or Progress) Bringing Light to Asia." But the pasha whose largesse was supposed to fund the project went bankrupt, the British occupied his country to collect their debts and Egypt's light failed. Bartholdi rethought his plan, redrew the design, and the Orient's loss was America's gain: "Liberty Enlightening the World."This anecdote about the statue stands near the middle of Michael Oren's vast new best seller, "Power, Faith and Fantasy: America in the Middle East, 1776 to the Present." It served as a metaphor for the mingled, often mirrored fates of two regions strangely bound by grandiose...
  • Making The Final Cut

    Li Yu's film "Lost In Beijing" traveled a hard road to this week's Berlin Film Festival, where it is competing for a Golden Bear. The director had to fully re-edit the work five times, making 53 changes and a 15-minute cut before China's film censors gave it the go-ahead to enter the competition. Li, whose film tells the story of a sexually charged relationship between a Beijing massage-parlor boss and one of his female employees, was forced to eliminate shots of dirty streets, prostitutes and gambling--as well as of the Chinese national flag and Tiananmen Square.On the surface, it looked just like another example of Chinese film censors wielding their axes. But the fact that the filmmakers and censors were having a dialogue at all is actually more a sign of liberalization than of excessive government control. "Previously, a film like this would have had no room to negotiate," says "Lost in Beijing" producer Fang Li, head of the Beijing-based Laurel Films. "Now at least, [the...
  • Now on Tap: Vintage Beer

    Forget 'born-on dates.' Vintage suds are becoming a popular pour at fine dining joints. But is any bottle of beer really worth $23? We swallowed hard and took the plunge.
  • Hot Flashes and Hormones

    Here's what you and your clinician should talk about before deciding whether to take estrogen.
  • Midlife Guide for Women: Sex

    I've heard that sex gets better for some women during the menopause transition but worse for others. What can I do to increase my chances of being in that first category?
  • Midlife Guide for Women: Mood

    I'm usually a pretty upbeat person, but lately I've been barking at everyone I know and shifting from neutral to supercranky in less than five seconds. I know I'm being unreasonable, but I can't seem to help myself.
  • Midlife Guide for Women: Heart

    My doctor says I need to watch my cholesterol, even though I'm only 47. I thought only men had to be concerned about heart disease. Does menopause change things?
  • Midlife Guide for Women: Eyes

    I've been wearing contact lenses since I was 13, but lately they feel uncomfortable. I'm constantly taking them out, cleaning them and reinserting them. Why are my eyes so dry and irritated?
  • Midlife Guide for Women: Sleep

    Lately, I've been having a lot of trouble sleeping no matter how tired I am. Is there a connection between menopause and insomnia?
  • Women As Meat

    What men consider beautiful about women changes over time. In 16th-century Antwerp, Peter Paul Rubens taught Dutch men to lust after pudgy brunettes. In 20th-century America, Hugh Hefner taught American men to lust after busty blondes, women just like Anna Nicole Smith. Any reflections on her death must first begin with deep sadness for yet another premature and needless death in our wounded world. Thirty-nine-year-old women should not die. We must also grieve for her infant daughter who, regardless of her possible fortune, is now consigned by fate to grow up without a mother—just as Anna Nicole had been forced by the same cruel fate to grow up without a father. Next we must force ourselves to remember that this front-page story is echoed by a thousand untold stories about unknown women who have died or been killed or driven to fatal addictions just because they were pretty. These women died because they were meat on the banquet table of predatory men. Their deaths must not be seen...