DACA by the Numbers: 15 Facts About the Youth Immigration Program Trump Could Soon Shut Down

Immigrants and advocates across the country were anxiously waiting this week to hear President Donald Trump's decision on whether he'll keep the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program.

The initiative, which allows young people who immigrated to the U.S. as children to temporarily escape deportation and receive other benefits, started under President Barack Obama in 2012. The next development on the program could come Tuesday, the date set by a group of 10 conservative state attorneys general who have vowed to challenge DACA in federal court should Trump not end it himself.

Related: 'Dreamers' fear Trump's immigration plans on DACA's fifth anniversary

Trump has flip-flopped on the issue in recent months, leaving DACA's future uncertain. Before you pick a side and start discussing it at the water cooler, you may want to review the facts. Here are 15 numbers and statistics you should know:

1. There are more than 43 million immigrants in the U.S., according to the Migration Policy Institute

2. About 11 million are undocumented immigrants.

3. An estimated 22 percent of undocumented immigrants are under age 25, according to the Department of Homeland Security.

4. The Migration Policy Institute said in 2016 that about 1.9 million people were eligible for DACA.

5. About 788,000 have had their requests for DACA status accepted, according to U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services.

6. In order to apply for DACA, immigrants had to be younger than 31 on June 15, 2012.

7. They must have come to the U.S. before turning 16. They must have lived in the U.S. since June 15, 2007.

8. In a Center for American Progress survey of roughly 3,000 DACA recipients, nine-tenths of respondents said they had jobs.

9. Their average hourly wage was $17.46 an hour, up from $10.29 before receiving DACA.

10. About 72 percent of respondents were in higher education.

11. After getting DACA, nearly 80 percent of respondents said they got driver's licenses. About half became organ donors.

12. A Morning Consult poll from April found that 56 percent of registered voters said Dreamers, another name for people who came to the U.S. as kids, "should be allowed to stay and become citizens if they meet certain requirements."

13. The Center for American Progress estimated that the U.S. would lose about $460 billion in GDP over the next 10 years without DACA. 

14. About 700,000 people could lose their jobs.

15. More than 1,800 governors, attorneys general, mayors, state representatives, judges, police chiefs and other leaders signed onto a letter supporting Dreamers and DACA recipients.

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