Education

  • best-high-schools-tease

    Results in National School-Reform Contest Spark Complaints

    While celebrations occurred in Massachusetts, New York, Hawaii, Florida, Rhode Island, the District of Columbia, Maryland, Georgia, North Carolina, and Ohio after the 10 were named winners of round two of the administration’s national education-reform competition, controversy was mounting over some of the more surprising winners and losers.
  • Best and Worst Cities for School Reform

    If you think about the cities best known for education reform, a few always come to mind: New Orleans, New York, Philadelphia, Milwaukee, Washington, D.C. But sometimes reputations outlast reality, and stars in the making don’t get the recognition they deserve.
  • school-teachers-los-angeles-hsmall

    L.A. Times Ranks City Teachers by Effectiveness

    Do parents have the right to know which of their kids' teachers are the most and least effective? That's the controversy roaring in California this week with the publication of a Los Angeles Times investigative series.
  • Senate Saves Race to the Top Education Program

    In a surprise move, the U.S. Senate did something good Wednesday—it moved to prevent more than 100,000 teachers from being laid off this fall and restored funds for President Obama’s signature Race to the Top education program.
  • school-credit-sc5005-hsmall

    Schools Start Financial-Literacy Requirements

    The financial-reform bill signed into law last week includes a section on dangerous mortgages, with a provision for educating the elderly, the poor, minorities, those with language barriers, and “other potentially vulnerable consumers.” Who’s not mentioned but should be? The young. Among unemployed Americans ages 18 to 29, more than a quarter are behind on mortgage payments, one 2009 study found, and this group also has soaring credit-card debt and bankruptcy rates.
  • senority-teachers-feo404-wide

    Should Seniority Count in Teacher Layoffs?

    Education reformers were feeling optimistic. With President Obama’s Race to the Top competition, which offers financial rewards to states willing to hold teachers accountable for their students’ performance, they’ve made real progress in weeding out poor teachers.
  • creativity-test-tease

    The Creativity Crisis

    Back in 1958, Ted Schwarzrock was an 8-year-old third grader when he became one of the “Torrance kids,” a group of nearly 400 Minneapolis children who completed a series of creativity tasks newly designed by professor E. Paul Torrance. Schwarzrock still vividly remembers the moment when a psychologist handed him a fire truck and asked, “How could you improve this toy to make it better and more fun to play with?”
  • Teachers' Union Anger Mounts for an Administration It Helped to Elect

    The theme of this year’s national teachers' union conventions was anger, particularly at President Obama, Education Secretary Arne Duncan, and reformers in general. But American Federation of Teachers president Randi Weingarten’s decision to emphasize collaboration rather than opposition to reform efforts could well boost her national image as the union leader the administration can work with.
  • The Boom in Online Courses

    Last month on the Daily Show, Minnesota Gov. Tim Pawlenty predicted the rise of “iCollege,” a Web-based model of higher education that students could download for $199 rather than “haul their keister” to class. Many academics snarled back (“pedagogical dystopia,” one Cornell professor called it), since the idea seems to minimize the role of live student-teacher exchanges. But Pawlenty’s vision already has some lofty adherents. Pennsylvania’s university system is considering making its language courses online only; Indiana recently added an “affordable” Web-based campus; and Yale Law School is sharing resources with the University of the People, a pioneering “global college” that’s tuition-free and totally online.
  • girls-science-hsmall

    Can Legislation Fix the U.S. Science Gender Gap?

    In 1972, when Mae Jemison was just 16 years old, she arrived at Stanford University, where she intended to pursue a degree in engineering. But it wasn’t long after arriving in Palo Alto that she learned that the university’s science departments weren’t nearly as enthusiastic about her as she was about them.
  • boys-same-sex-education-hsmall

    The New Segregation Debate

    Single-sex classes have increased by 4,000 percent in less than a decade. Can educating girls and boys separately fix our public schools, or does it reinforce outmoded gender stereotypes?
  • 58167493,x-default

    Kirk Accused of Exaggerating His Teaching Record

    Mark Kirk, the Republican contender for Barack Obama's former Illinois Senate seat, had previously misrepresented his military service in the course of campaigning. Now his oft-recalled time as a teacher is being questioned too.
  • best-high-schools-tease

    Charter Schools Often Worse Than Public Schools

    Some 15 of NEWSWEEK’s top 100 public high schools are charter schools. Since charter schools amount to only about 4 percent of all public schools, that would seem to suggest that charter schools are a runaway success story, right?
  • tease-100613-best-high-schools-quiz-article-page-600

    Quiz: Guess Which Celebs Were High-School Nerds?

    Can you guess which of America's favorite entrepreneurs, celebrities, and athletes were nerds in high school? Take our quiz to find out what these stars were like as teens and where their high school ranks on NEWSWEEK's 2010 America's Best High Schools list.
  • Breaking the Teacher Unions' Monopoly

    As a result of a revolutionary new contract, teachers in who are rated incompetent can be fired immediately—a practice common in industry but unheard of in American public schools.
  • Book Q&A: 'Making Ideas Happen'

    Thomas Edison said genius is 1 percent inspiration, 99 percent perspiration. Starting a new business takes more than just an idea; executing it is what counts. In his new book, Making Ideas Happen, author Scott Belsky explains how creative types need to learn how to get things done.
  • 82869788SG032_Government_Pl,x-default

    In Defense of Teachers

    For the vast majority of public-school teachers, so much of their job is out of their control that asking them to be held accountable for their students’ performance is tantamount to blaming car salesmen for Toyota’s accelerator problems.
  • Pink Slips Latest Proof of Anti-Spending Pressure

    Nobody likes the prospect of financially pressed school districts handing out thousands of pink slips to teachers, but Democrats’ proposal for a $23 billion bailout attracted so many critics early on that it seemed doomed from the start, despite energetic lobbying by teachers' unions and congressional educational leaders....
  • Arne Duncan Dodges Standardized Test Question

    Secretary Arne Duncan went on CNN this morning to promote the Department of Education's newly expanded Teacher Incentive Fund, which will award $437 million in grants to educators who markedly improve student performance. The measuring stick? According to an official DOE press release, the proposed incentive plans must "use fair and transparent evaluations based on multiple measures including student growth." ...

Pages