Germany Leads the World in Penis Enlargement Surgery by a Long Way

US_Navy_020719-N-2781V-005_USS_Washington_-_oral_surgeon
US Navy

This summer’s World Cup may have marked the watershed when “German” became shorthand for unparalleled performance, though it seems in some respects German quality may not have all that much to do with hard work and a little more with a short trip to the doctor’s.

According to latest figures from the International Society of Aesthetic Plastic Surgery, Germany is the world’s capital for penis enlargement surgery. An estimated 2,786 procedures have taken place in the Bundesrepublik over the last year.

With an estimated total 15,414 cases of the procedure worldwide, nearly one in five of all penis enlargement operations were performed in Germany.

This amounts to eight out of every 100,000 men in Germany, which is four times the number of those undergoing the procedure in its closest contender for the top spot on the list - Venezuela.

473 men went under the knife for the procedure in Venezuela, while 471 opted for the nip and tuck in third placed Spain.

The German Institute of Urology and Phalloplasty Surgery boasts penis enlargement surgery could enlarge the glans of the penis by 30-50%, adding 3-6cm in length and 2-3cm in girth, with no visible scars.

It seems penis enlargement surgery must require a particular expertise to it as neither Germany, Venezuela or Spain even crack the top three of countries with the highest number of general plastic surgeries performed.

Despite the ISAPS figures showing a global rise in plastic surgery, penis enlargement falls low on the list of go-to procedures for most patients, as 87.2% of people having work done are women. Needless to say “phalloplasty” is not in the top ten surgeries worldwide.

The figures don’t specify the nationality of the patients undergoing the procedure, so it’s unclear whether Germans themselves are benefitting from the numbers, or whether they simply represent international admiration for German feats of engineering.

Either way, Newsweek’s recent prediction of a German century of success appears to be working out in ways that we never could have guessed.

Join the Discussion