Miami Wants to Ruin Spring Break by Banning Weed, Playing Mozart Really Loud

The City of Miami Beach in Florida is so annoyed by the army of spring breakers descending on its beaches for wild parties fueled by alcohol and drugs that it’s considering a drastic, if a little bizarre, countermeasure.

One elected city official suggested playing classical music, such as Mozart, at loud volumes to break up parties on the beach.

That's according to a report in The Miami Herald, which said the city's commissioners were juggling ideas on how to tackle spring break partygoers after a chaotic weekend.

spring break Students from the University of Massachusetts use a funnel to drink beer during spring break on South Beach March 16, 2007 in Miami Beach, Florida. Students from universities and colleges around the country attend spring break which starts at the end of February and into mid-April. Joe Raedle/Getty Images

“I think we should do something radical,” Commissioner Kristen Rosen Gonzalez reportedly said after making the classical music suggestion at a meeting.

Another of her ideas was tightening marijuana legislation so those caught in possession of the drug are arrested. Currently, city police only issue fines. Rosen Gonzalez is running for Congress in the forthcoming elections.

The various suggestions will be considered and a plan drawn up at a later date.

Miami was in the grip of spring break fever on the weekend starting Friday, March 16. What made matters worse was its clash with St. Patrick’s Day on the Saturday.

Traffic along Miami’s beaches was reportedly gridlocked and residents complained of antisocial behavior, including drug taking, by the hordes of visitors.

Spring break is a period between March and April each year during which colleges and high schools close for vacation. Historically, young people flock to coastal areas in warm climates, such as Florida and Mexico, for parties.

In the coastal city of Cancun, Mexico, authorities told spring break tourists to keep their clothes on during the festivities. They also ordered visitors not to drink alcohol in the open or urinate in public.

Jane García, director general of municipal tourism, told Mexico News Daily that 20,000 copies of a code of conduct were printed to hand to spring breakers as they arrive.

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