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  • Buying For Your Country

    When American financial markets reopened Monday morning, the scent of smoke wafted through the corridors of the New York Stock Exchange building at 11 Wall Street, and a few people on the trading floor wore surgical masks. But the more popular accessories among traders and clerks were American flag neck ties and baseball caps.Stock-exchange workers were not the only ones feeling a rush of patriotic zeal at the sound of the opening bell. Over the weekend, e-mail chains zipped around the country, encouraging Americans to buy stock in a grassroots effort to keep the markets from plunging. "What if every red blooded American who cares deeply about the need for the United States to weather this storm and remain a beacon of hope in a tough world, bought a few shares of their favorite stock on Monday?" asked one such e-mail, weaving through government offices in Washington, D.C. "Fifty million Americans buying 20 shares of the stock of their choice would result in a billion share push to...
  • Out Of The Closet

    The protest certainly made for good TV. Last month gay activist Noel Chen was led--tied up, hooded and pulled by a leash--to the gates of the central police station in Hong Kong. His comrades bound him spread-eagled to the iron fence in order to protest a recent police raid on a shop selling S&M paraphernalia. When cops came to untie him, Chen mugged for the cameras that had gathered, writhing and moaning as if in ecstasy.The stunt was broadcast not just in tiny Hong Kong but across southern China, where news from the former British colony is carried on local Chinese stations. And there Chen's antics had far more than entertainment value. Homosexuality, for decades considered a disease by authorities, is one of the most enduring taboos in China. But in the industrial south especially, where some of the country's greatest social and economic changes are occurring, a vocal gay community is beginning to assert itself. Individuals are learning to explore and take pride in their...
  • Television: The Queen Of Country Becomes A Sitcom

    Remember Reba McEntire in the TV movie "The Gambler Returns"? Neither does she. "I played..." She stops to think. "Just a part. Just the female part." Or how about "Country Gold"? "I don't even remember doing it," she says. You can't blame McEntire for her forgettable Hollywood resume. She tried for years to get the movie and TV world to pay attention to her. For the most part it came up with worse stuff than the projects she can't remember doing. "They'd say, 'Well, we've got this one script. You could be a country singer'," she says. " 'It's only like two minutes in the whole movie, but we'll put you in a sequined boob tube and spandex pants and you can sit up there on a bale of hay'." For a woman who happens to be the most successful female country singer in history, those offers were downright insulting. Of course, McEntire was too much of a lady to put it like that. "I said, 'Pass'."All of which makes McEntire's recent acting adventures something of a miracle. First she starred...
  • Spyware: Taking On Office Snoopers

    Alex Kozinski hardly fits the mold of the digital rebel. At 51, the Romanian-born federal judge, a conservative appointed by Ronald Reagan, still drafts his opinions on an IBM Selectric typewriter. But that didn't stop him from marching into the server room of the Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals' San Francisco headquarters last May and shutting down a server programmed to detect unauthorized Internet use by the 30,000 employees of the federal court system. The monitoring software was installed by an obscure division of the judicial branch called the Administrative Office. The system was supposed to detect whether workers in the nation's courthouses were wasting government time and taxpayer dollars by visiting porn sites or downloading songs and video clips. But by treating court workers who must uphold the nation's electronic surveillance laws "like a bunch of 12-year-old kids," says Kozinski, the AO may also have been violating their civil rights. "I saw myself as preventing an...
  • Scary Gary

    Congressman Gary Condit's recent TV appearance didn't do much for his career. But it sure made BuyCostumes.com happy. The company was suddenly deluged with requests for a Condit Halloween mask. BuyCostumes. com will make only about 1,000 masks--it's too late to produce more before mid-October--but CEO Jalem Getz thinks the scandal will yield the year's hottest costume. No Chandra Levy mask, though. "That's going too far," he says.
  • Investors Ask: To Buy Or Cry?

    Look into your mirror and repeat after me: "I don't know where stocks are going next." Then say, "Neither does my stockbroker, my mutual-fund company, NEWSWEEK or anyone on CNBC." Will the market get better or worse this month? Which stocks will turn out to be fabulous, and which ones will get pasted? Is the U.S. economy crumbling or just passing through a typical cycle (including the whining)? Mirror, mirror, on the wall...Stocks plunged last week. About three years of gains have now been wiped out from the volatile Nasdaq as well as the S&P index of 500 leading stocks. Business profits still look lousy, unemployment jumped to 4.9 percent (up from 4.5 percent before), confidence swooned and many families seem inclined to save their tax refunds rather than spend them (good choice, in my opinion).On the other hand, the money gods haven't suddenly sprayed American business with a monster can of Raid. The leading economic indicators have risen four months in a row. Productivity...
  • Japan: Putting On The Gumshoes

    Yasuo Sumida is hot on a suspect's trail. His target--a middle-aged man in a dark suit--enters a department store in central Tokyo and heads for the furniture section, where he spends the next half-hour idly perusing tables, chairs and sofas. Sumida makes sure that there are only two exits from the building, positions himself behind a tall chest and watches the man, feeling the sweat bead on his forehead. Suddenly the target turns to look directly at him, and Sumida, in a panic, sprints up to the next floor. "I don't know why I did that," says the embarrassed Sumida, 45, a mild-mannered former real-estate salesman from Osaka. "I lost my cool."Sherlock Holmes he's not. Fortunately Sumida was engaged in a mock investigation, part of an intensive one-week course offered by a Tokyo detective school. Hundreds, perhaps thousands, of other equally unprepossessing salarymen are putting on gumshoes as well. In Osaka, the only prefecture that requires detective agencies to register, the...
  • Fast Fashion

    At 11:15 on a Wednesday morning in May, in an industrial park outside the port of La Coruna in northwestern Spain, a 65-year-old man in casual business attire shambled out of his office and into a room with a TV set. Fifteen minutes later the company he started as a young man began selling shares to the public for the first time. What he launched in 1975 as a local store called Zara was now the world's third largest clothing retailer, Inditex, with two dozen manufacturing plants in Spain and stores in 34 countries from the United States to Japan. The man watched on TV as Inditex shares shot up 26 percent in a matter of minutes, despite the dismal climate for IPOs everywhere. At 11:45 he left the room. His 60 percent share of the company was worth $6 billion, and he had just become the richest man in Spain. Later that afternoon Amancio Ortega Gaona had lunch in a company canteen, as usual....
  • Silver Linings From A Summit

    Even Nelson Mandela was frustrated. The man who calmly outwaited apartheid, who endured 27 years imprisoned on Robben Island, found himself all but biting his nails as he watched reports of the acrimony arising from the U.N. anti-racism conference in Durban, South Africa. "When I heard... the American delegation had pulled out, I was on the point of picking up the phone and speaking to President Bush," said Mandela, who pronounced himself "worried about the attitude of the United States" and "sorry" that good will had notprevailed. Only good manners--and the desire to defer to his successor--restrained him. "It's not good to intervene if you have not been asked to do so," said Mandela, former president of South Africa, looking healthy (if thin), despite under-going treatment for prostate cancer, as he welcomed visitors to his immaculate yet modest home just outside Johannesburg.Mandela made it clear to his visitors--the Rev. Jesse Jackson, his wife, Jackie, and two American...
  • Stealth Care For Networks

    Ryan Russell immediately recognized the characters scrolling down his PC screen. There, amid the arcana of Assembly language, were some Windows commands. They looked like part of the Code Red worm. But as Russell, an intrusion- detection specialist for Security Focus.com, an online security resource, wiped the worm from his machine, he noticed several lines that differed from those of the pest that had infected 300,000 computers worldwide and caused a minor panic in mid-July. The bad news was that he had already erased it. The good news was that within minutes, the worm attacked his computer again. This time Russell captured it. Over the next 24 hours he and two colleagues analyzed the new worm, Code Red II, developed a fix for it and posted their findings on the Incidents mailing list of SecurityFocus.The notable thing was not that Russell was able to crack the worm's code, but that he was able to copy it. After two days Code Red II instructs the infected computer to reboot,...
  • A Social 'Neutron Bomb'

    Elena Yaskevich hunches over her desk and lights up another cigarette. Her office phone, one of Moscow's few drug-addiction hot lines, rings once again. She begins yet another round of questions, the same as the last. "How old is your daughter?" Pause. "I see, 17. Vich?" the Russian word for HIV. Solemnly, she nods as she gets the mother's expected reply.Even pros like Yaskevich have been blind-sided by the tidal wave of HIV that's hit Russia over the past two years. "This is a serious threat," she says, likening it to a "neutron bomb." That bomb has already exploded among intravenous drug users. The question is when it will go off in the general population. Officially, Russia has diagnosed 129,261 new cases of HIV over the past year and a half, including this July. That's the highest rate of infection in Europe, making Russians seven times more likely than their Western counterparts to contract the virus. And the real number of new cases could be anywhere from five to 10 times...
  • About Cocaine And Bananas

    Asa Hutchinson cannot be accused of skating across the pond of life in search of easy jobs. While a congressman from Arkansas, he was a manager of the House impeachment case against a popular president from Arkansas. Now Hutchinson is head of the Drug Enforcement Administration, and when he leaves that position many people will say, "Well, that didn't work."No matter what this wise and experienced man does--no matter how imaginative his mixture of measures to dampen demand for drugs and disrupt the supply of them--a decade from now there will be complaints that drug policy has not "worked" because the "war" on drugs has not been "won." (The Anti-Drug Abuse Act of 1988 promised "a drug-free America by 1995.") Then, as now, many will say that legalization would do less harm than current policies do.We do need some new policies--but we also need a more sensible notion of what constitutes "working." Here success comes only in shades of gray, but is not for that reason derisory.The...
  • The Boringness Of Computers

    Technologies come and go, but fame is even more fleeting. Back in the 1980s when a few techies with connections to the Defense Department were playing around with computer networks, who cared? It wasn't until Web browsers made it possible to point and click your way through the Internet that things really got interesting. Likewise, computers in the 1960s rarely made the evening news, but now everybody knows the story of those two kids in a garage who created the first Apple. In each case the technology had become personal. Computing and networking existed before they became popular, and they will continue to exist long after most of us stop thinking about them altogether.That day began to seem a whole lot closer last week when Hewlett-Packard Corp. announced its plan to acquire Compaq Computer. Each of these firms entered the public consciousness by making tangible products that had a visceral appeal. At a time when PCs were deskbound, Compaq put them in a shock-resistant case,...
  • A Fire Station's Story

    Often amidst a tragedy, small miracles appear. The firefighters at the East 29th Street station, which houses two companies, Engine 16 and Ladder 7, can attest to one such incident. Last Tuesday afternoon, their colleague, Lt. Mickey Kross, seemingly came back from the dead. Kross, a wiry firefighter with a soft-spoken manner, climbed out from underneath the World Trade Center's smoking wreckage with nothing but a cut on his nose. Still, one miracle isn't always enough, and the firefighters at the East 29th Street station are hoping for another: They want the six missing members of Ladder 7-all who were on duty at the time of the disaster-to come home, too.The story of these firefighters is a familiar one from last Tuesday morning. The call came in at around 9:10 a.m. Although Ladder 7 was out on another call, they headed downtown to the World Trade Center. "They were probably here within the first 20 minutes," says Vincent Pickford, a former Ladder 7 firefighter who hopes to help...
  • Welcome To The New World Order

    The unthinkable happened in New York on Sept. 11. Out of the clear blue sky-literally-terror struck our harried lives. Despite our reputation as a cold-hearted megalopolis, New Yorkers do feel. And we bleed.So it should come as a surprise to no one that we have found the images coming from abroad both heartening and harrowing. The picture of the little boy placing a bouquet outside the American mission in London, the buses motionless for a minute of silence in Stockholm, the TV anchors dressed in black in Vienna. All sending the unmistakable message, first uttered by Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres and repeated in the editorial pages of the French daily Le Monde: "Today, we are all Americans."But equally poignant for Americans were the images of Palestinian children "celebrating" our anguish. Small crowds in the West Bank, including children, shot off automatic weapons and danced in the street. Less dramatic, but just as hurtful, were the murmurs coming from countries as...
  • Saving New York

    It was around 9:00 a.m. on Tuesday and 1 World Trade Center had just been pierced by a Boeing 767 passenger jet. Deputy Mayor Joe Lhota and other city officials were racing to 7 World Trade Center just across the plaza from the Twin Towers. There, on the 23rd floor, was the city's Emergency Command Center, a state-of-the-art $15 million facility designed to serve as the city's nerve center whenever disaster would strike. Three years ago, when plans for the command center were reported, the project was widely derided-a testament, the critics jeered, to Mayor Rudy Giuliani's bunker mentality. Now, however, there was nothing the city needed more. The only problem: the facility's proximity to the disaster site was about to render it utterly useless.Minutes after his arrival at the World Trade Center complex, Lhota heard a voice on a police radio: another plane was screaming toward the second tower. Then, a blast. Flames, metal, and glass shot over Lhota and the other city officials...
  • Searching For A Son

    The first thing fireman Mickey Kirby did when he heard about the attack on the World Trade Center was to strap on his gear. The second was think about his kids, three of whom work in Manhattan. Mickey Jr.? Also a firefighter, stationed in Chinatown, he was safe on paternity leave with his wife and new baby. Kelly? A Morgan Stanley customer-service rep on the fifth floor of WTC 5, she was, at that hour, still probably on the subway to work when a plane plowed into Tower One. And Chris? Why worry about Chris? Last Mickey Sr. had heard, the carpenters' union had him working on 23rd Street, far from the disaster site.But five days after the attack, 21-year-old Chris-who was working his way through night school at Bronx Community College to qualify for a firefighting job like his dad and brother-is still missing. On Monday, he left the 23rd Street job for a two-day stint on the 107th floor of WTC 2, the south tower. His sister Kelly, excited that he would be working so near her office,...
  • Newsweek Poll: Bush Soars

    If President Bush launches military strikes against terrorist bases, he will have the support of most Americans. In a NEWSWEEK poll released today, 71 percent of 1,001 adults surveyed by telephone said they favored such attacks, even with civilian casualties. And 54 percent favored attacking those suspected of terrorism, even if it hasn't been proved that they are responsible for last week's attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. The poll has a margin of error of plus or minus 3 percentage points.An overwhelming 89 percent of respondents approved of the way President Bush has handled the crisis. His general approval rating stands at 82 percent-higher than the rating his father received during the gulf war in 1990, and virtually the same as the 84 percent approval rating President Franklin D. Roosevelt received after the bombing of Pearl Harbor in 1941.While Americans commend Bush for a job well done, they believe New York City Mayor Rudolph Giuliani has handled the...
  • Dateline New York

    Stafania DiLellis and her two colleagues, all seasoned reporters from the Italian daily La Repubblica, began packing for a journey from Rome to New York City just hours after local television there aired the awful images of the crashes and collapse. But already global air traffic was jumbled and U.S. air space was sealed off.This was not a story they were planning on reporting from afar, however. So at 5 a.m. Wednesday, Rome time, they chartered a plane to Frankfurt, Germany, because they thought they could catch a commercial flight to Montreal from there. They were wrong. So they returned to Rome then hired another private jet to get them to Milan, where they caught a plane to Reykjavik, Iceland, with connection on to New York..Of course, en route from Reykjavik they were diverted, landing instead in Montreal on Friday morning well after 1 a.m. From there they rented a car and drove, eight long hours to New York City, making them among the very first of the international press...
  • Alleged Hijackers May Have Trained At U.S. Bases

    U.S. military sources have given the FBI information that suggests five of the alleged hijackers of the planes that were used in Tuesday's terror attacks received training at secure U.S. military installations in the 1990s.Three of the alleged hijackers listed their address on drivers licenses and car registrations as the Naval Air Station in Pensacola, Fla.-known as the "Cradle of U.S. Navy Aviation," according to a high-ranking U.S. Navy source.Another of the alleged hijackers may have been trained in strategy and tactics at the Air War College in Montgomery, Ala., said another high-ranking Pentagon official. The fifth man may have received language instruction at Lackland Air Force Base in San Antonio, Tex. Both were former Saudi Air Force pilots who had come to the United States, according to the Pentagon source.But there are slight discrepancies between the military training records and the official FBI list of suspected hijackers-either in the spellings of their names or with...
  • Bin Laden's Imprint

    Thomas Gouttierre is inclined to think Osama bin Laden is the godfather of the attacks in New York and Washington. At least he can't think of anyone else. "Osama bin Laden is part of the globalized world," says Gouttierre, the dean of international studies at the University of Nebraska at Omaha and a veteran bin Laden watcher at UNO's Center for Afghanistan Studies. "His organization is the most globalized." Everything about the attacks-the type of target, the extensive planning and most of all the overseas reach-suggests bin Laden's organization, Al Qaeda ("The Base").Moreover, says Gouttierre, who has lived in Afghanistan for more than 10 years at different times, first as a Peace Corps volunteer, then with the United Nations peacekeeping mission to Afghanistan, where he reported on both bin Laden and the Taliban, Al Qaeda is now the most capable force among known Islamic terrorist groups.Most others are riven by internal conflicts or else have been heavily infiltrated. Indeed,...
  • Questions And Answers: 'There Is No Book For An Incident Like This'

    Following the 1993 terrorist attack at the World Trade Center, Jerome M. Hauer was named the first-ever director and commissioner of the Mayor's Office of Emergency Management (OEM) for the City of New York. The office was designated as the center that would coordinate all agencies in times of crisis, and create its systems and protocols.The OEM directs the city's overall emergency-response planning, as well as specialized planning for response to chemical, biological and nuclear-related incidents. Hauer also directed the design and implementation of New York City's state-of-the-art Emergency Operations Center situated on the 23rd floor of 7 World Trade Center, a bunker that went unused in the Tuesday's explosions because of its proximity to the disaster (WTC 7 collapsed later that day).NEWSWEEK's David France spoke with Hauer over his cell phone from inside the New York City Medical Examiner's office, which he was visiting with Health and Human Services Secretary Tommy Thompson...
  • Prejudice In Pakistan

    When I got Maj. Gen. Hamid Gul on the telephone at his home to ask if I could interview him, his reaction was guarded at first. "What's your nationality?" he asked. "American," I said. "Are you a Jew?" When I said I wasn't, he agreed to the interview. "I'm sorry to ask you that," he added. "It's just that Jews wouldn't understand what I have to say."Indeed they wouldn't, and nor would most people. General Gul's basic message is that Osama bin Laden is innocent, and that the attacks on New York and Washington were an Israeli-engineered attempt at a coup against the government of the United States. He rattled off the proof: "You must look inside. F-16s don't scramble in time, though they had 18 minutes after the first plane hit the World Trade Center. Radar gets jammed. Transponders are turned off. A flight to Los Angeles turns to Washington and is in the air for 45 minutes, and the world's most sophisticated air defense doesn't go into action. I tell you, it was a coup [attempt], and...
  • The Sad Tale Of The Iron Workers

    For all New Yorkers, the sight of their city's two tallest buildings plunging downward was unimaginable. In addition to the lives lost, a Big Apple icon vanished as well-a gaping hole in our storied postcards.But for the New York-area members of the iron workers' union, there is another cruelty to absorb: many of them built the Twin Towers with their bare hands-or are the progeny of those who did. Now they're on the front lines of the rescue effort, frantically pulling apart what's left of their pride and joy, hoping to find even one survivor."I worked on the razor gang from '70 to '71," says rescue volunteer and member of Local 40 Paul Gaulden, 57, of the Bronx, N.Y. "We put in outer joints so that if it swayed on a windy day it would only move 12 inches. I told my kids I built the tallest buildings in the world."When the Twin Towers were finished in 1973, they were the tallest. For the iron workers who did the job then, the two buildings were a source of particular pride. "For us,...
  • Living Politics: Check Please

    In the Land of the Free and the Home of the Brave, we know this truth to be self-evident: there is no free lunch. Now it's time for the Baby Boom Generation to pay for the banquet it enjoyed until last week.After years of living it up-or down-with a sense of abandon bestowed upon them by prosperity and peace, the Boomers have been presented with the check. What's due is not just money-though it is that, too-but the kind of patriotic faith and sacrifice Boomers now say they admire.The children of the World War II Generation, some 75 million born between 1946 and 1964, were reared to think the world of themselves. More recently, they've come down with a bad case of generation envy, fixating on the Founding Fathers, whose biographies topped best-seller lists, and on "The Greatest Generation." Steven Spielberg and Tom Hanks (Boomers both) have spent $125 million to retell the story of D-Day on HBO.The self-glorification was never justified (Boomers were more lucky than good) and neither...
  • Coping With Tragedy

    The terror attack on America left a country coping with a grief that goes beyond mourning. People across the nation, particularly those closest to the disasters, are experiencing a variety of trauma-related stresses. NEWSWEEK's Laura Fording spoke with Esther Giller, the president and executive director of the Sidran Traumatic Stress Foundation, a national nonprofit organization that helps people cope with traumatic stress conditions.What is Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD)?It is a medical and psychological condition that sometimes occurs in people who have experienced an overwhelmingly traumatic event. In order to [be diagnosed] with the disorder, you have to have a certain number of symptoms. However, people can have these symptoms and feel as though they have posttraumatic stress and not actually have a diagnosable disorder.What are some of the symptoms?There are three symptom clusters. People will experience many of these symptoms following an event like the one we've just...
  • Asbestos Alert

    Nearly four days after the World Trade Towers collapse sent massive columns of dust and smoke over lower Manhattan and into the shifting winds around New York Harbor, there is still no clear picture of how much asbestos or other hazardous materials may have been set free into the environment, officials say.But in the meantime, the federal Environmental Protection Agency is beginning to enforce measures meant to keep the untold pollutants from spreading any further than they already have, says EPA administrator Christine Todd Whitman, who maintains that the risks are negligible.Late Friday, the agency ordered to the site 16 specially equipped, truck-mounted vacuums to begin removing the white dust, which in some places has swept into dunes several inches deep. And beginning this weekend, the caravans of brimming refuse trucks that have been removing debris to dumps must be sprayed down with water and enclosed with tarpaulins before they make their way through the city. "We're getting...