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  • Sweet Smell Of Success

    There's a little Cyrano in all of us," says actor Gerard Depardieu, but he just happens to be blessed with more. The French heartthrob with the prominent proboscis has blown away European audiences with his portrayal of the lovesick Cyrano de Bergerac, and he's sure. to be the French toast of America when the film opens this week. At a recent screening in New York, partygoers were also treated to snootfuls of Depardieu's own vintage. Here's to the days of wine and noses.
  • Bad Roads

    Everyone knows that the U.S. infrastructure is crumbling, but now we've been told how much of a drag it will put on the economy. Drawing on Department of Transportation figures, a new report by organized labor warns that in the next four years the lost productivity resulting from bad roads and bridges will cause a 3.2 percent drop in the gross national product, an 8 percent increase in the consumer price index and a 2.2 percent reduction in employment. Nationally, 41 percent of all bridges are deficient or obsolete.
  • Who Will Be The New Czar?

    Departing drug czar William Bennett's top deputy Reggie Walton, is pushing hard to succeed his boss, but Bush administration insiders speculate that the job's more likely to go to one of last week's Republican losers. Heading the list of possible candidates are Illinois Rep. Lynn Martin, who lost her bid for a Senate seat, and Gov. Bob Martinez of Florida and Sen. Rudy Boschwitz of Minnesota, both of whom were defeated for re-election. Other contenders are HUD general counsel Francis Keating and former Customs commissioner William von Raab. Bennett himself hasn't recommended a replacement.
  • Bad Times At Hangover U.

    Marty woke up at 5 a.m. when the nurse slapped him in the face. It had been a long night: the party started with beer and graduated to Russian vodka. Marty downed shot after shot until he vomited on someone's leg. He thinks he spent an hour face down in the middle of the street. The ambulance ride to the hospital was a blur, too. In fact, Marty's only vivid memory of his 18th birthday is the morning after. "Hangovers are not fun," says the Harvard freshman. ...
  • '92 Campaign: Preclude To A Kiss:

    Kiss me," Mario Cuomo said to his granddaughter Emily last week at his campaign headquarters, leaning his cheek toward the little girl. Emily puckered up and bent toward Cuomo, who quickly pulled his head away. "Kiss me," the governor said. Again, little Emily leaned forward to kiss his cheek, and again he moved his head away. Watching the puzzled look that crossed her face, Cuomo smiled, stuck out his jaw and said once more, "KISS me. " She finally planted a big, wet smack near his chin. ...
  • Dial 'P' For Psychotherapy

    When comedian Richard Lewis moved to Los Angeles from New York in the mid-'70s, he realized that he needed psychological help more than ever, so he continued his group therapy by phone. "My group conference-called me," he says. "I knew it was time for a change when I heard the therapist say to one of the women, 'Weep closer to the phone'." Lewis eventually found an L.A. shrink, but now he's on the road so much that he often ends up having telephonic therapy with her. ...
  • Eavesdropping On Noriega

    From the day of his recruitment as a CIA "asset" to his capture and imprisonment by U.S. forces last January, Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega has always been a special case--a brutal and corrupt dictator whose alleged involvement in big-time drug trafficking prompted the Bush administration to invade a friendly country and then launch a high-stakes criminal prosecution against its wily former ally. Last week, after months of legal maneuvering, the Noriega case exploded in a confrontation over alleged government misconduct--and to make matters worse, the courtroom drama led to a rancorous dispute over freedom of the press as well. ...
  • Still Searching For A Way To Avoid War

    Is Saddam Hussein looking for a peaceful way out of his standoff with tine: west? One man who thinks so is King Hussein of Jordan, who may: understand the Iraqi leader better than most. Alone among leaders leaders, the king took Saddam's: talk of a stike on Kuwait seriously before the: invasion. He knew Saddam wasn't the king to bluff. Now, the king says, Saddam is searching for a way to avoid war. "There's a very, very clear wish for a peaceful solution to the problem," the king told NEWSWEEK. ...
  • The Beauty And The Beach

    What becomes a loudmouth most? For Roseanne Barr, it's either white mink and bubble gum or wet sand. In photos by Annie Leibovitz for the December Vanity Fair, the corpulent comedienne and hubby Tom Arnold hit the beach in formal duds and then, in more appropriate garb, roll around in the mudlike sand. "From Here to Eternity" it ain't. The accompanying article, "Don't Hate Me Because I'm Beautiful," offers more glimpses into their relationship. "We're mentally ill," says Barr. "We never get sick of each other. That's how sick we are. " If you get sick of them, you can move on in the same issue, to the 1990 Hall of Fame (photos also by Leibovitz). Inductees-including Marla Maples and Marion Barry-are honored as "the good, the bad and the acquitted." No holds Barred: Roseanne and husband Tom play dress-up
  • Who's That Big Boozer?

    You've already heard about all the major gaffes, vicious ads and scandals, sexual and otherwise, produced by the election of 1990. But campaigns also produce little-noticed moments of lesser drama. Herewith, some special awards from out-of-the-way corners of Campaign '90: ...
  • Whipping Up Memories

    Autumn at last, and as the days grow short and the dry leaves rustle underfoot, alert cookbook writers everywhere sense the nip of nostalgia in the air. Time to pull out those recipes for long-simmering stews, fill the kitchen with the scent of baking cookies, then switch on the word processor and turn it all into dear old cash. This year the stack of my-favorite cornbread-stuffing cookbooks is higher than ever, possibly as a corrective to more esoteric trends of recent seasons. How many recipes for low-cholesterol Thai versions of raspberry creme brulee can one family use? So bookstores are packed with titles trumpeting old-fashioned cookery, some written from the heart and others from the dictionary of generic sentiment. "Sometimes we forget, but when all is said and done, it is love that we all want most," declares Rose Levy Beranbaum in her introduction to Rose's Christmas Cookies (255 pages. Morrow. $19.95). "It is the best, most exalting emotion we know.... It redeems us and...
  • The High Price Of Hatred

    Had it not been his own funeral, Rabbi Meir Kahane would have scoured the crowd for recruits. He always turned up after an Arab killed a Jew. Kahane's assassination in New York City last week set off a furious reaction. Within hours two West Bank villagers lay dead of gunshot wounds. One follower in Israel promised "a river of blood" in his memory. Prominent Israeli Arabs, Jewish leftists and Palestinians were threatened and went into hiding. During the funeral procession in Jerusalem, young men in yellow T shirts--the signature color of Kahane's Kach movement--beat up at least four Arabs. ...
  • Costner Takes Center Stage--As A Director

    There's a line in the opening scenes of "Dances With Wolves" that Kevin Costner loves. Lt. John J. Dunbar, played by Costner, is propelled to glory by an act of stupendous recklessness. "The strangeness of life cannot be measured," he narrates in his earnest monotone. "Trying to produce my own death was elevated to the status of a living hero." Sitting in his stuffy trailer, fighting a cold on the set of "Robin Hood: Prince of Thieves," Costner repeats it just to hear it again. ...
  • Busting The Prince Of Love

    Anyone who calls himself Yahweh should be viewed with skepticism. Hulon Mitchell Jr. calls himself Yahweh Ben Yahweh ("God the son of God"). He wears flowing white robes, claims to be the leader of a lost black tribe of Israel and makes speeches in which he says his followers, not Jews, are the original Semites. The 55-year-old leader would be as dismissible as any other full-bearded, self-proclaimed savior if not for one thing: he can deliver as many as 12,000 votes to politicians in and around Miami, where his cult, the Nation of Yahweh, prospers. Those are the kinds of numbers that turn skepticism to support, and so last month Miami Mayor Xavier Suarez proclaimed Yahweh Ben Yahweh Day. "They do inculcate a certain lawfulness and discipline in their members, which is admirable," the mayor once said. According to a federal grand jury, though, the cult's methods were anything but admirable. This Yahweh doesn't believe in an eye for an eye: the indictment says followers sometimes...
  • Reading Between The Lions

    It's a good thing no one yelled "Author, author" at the New York Public Library last week--there might have been a stampede. More than 1,000 literati and glitterati were corralled for "A Decade of Literary Lions," a reunion of the pride of distinguished writers honored in the past 10 years for their contributions to the world of words. Other contributions were also greatly appreciated--more than $1 million was raised that night for the library's book-acquisition fund. Even in such a large pack, the 118 lions prowling around were easy to spot; they all had to wear large red ribbons with gold lion-head medallions around their necks. Norman Mailer, with his statuesque wife, Norris Church, paused to chat with Jay McInerney and his lioness Marla Hanson. The beloved Toni Morrison compared notes with "Ironweed" scribe William Kennedy. Tom Wolfe, however, was practically unrecognizable in black tie instead of white suit. In the mane, everyone seemed to be hiving a rip-roaring time.
  • At Home On The Range

    If you tried to make Evelyn Cameron up, nobody would believe you. This aristocratic Victorian Englishwoman (her half brother was Lord Battersea, a big noise in Gladstone's cabinet) was an expert equestrian, an avid hunter a loving wife, a fine writer, an observant naturalist, an accomplished rancher and, above all, a superb photographer. ...
  • From Peaks To Valleys

    By the time you read this, you'll probably know the ending to television's biggest mystery since J. R. Ewing nearly got bumped off in "Dallas" back in 1980. The question is--will you care? Long before the much-hyped denouement of ABC's "Twin Peaks" finally aired last Saturday night, enthusiasm for the quirky series had grown colder than a day-old cup of joe. Just ask "Twin Peaks" fan David Jefferson. A Wall Street Journal reporter in Los Angeles, Jefferson decided to organize a "Who Killed Laura Palmer?" party on Nov. 10 and posted a sign-up sheet on his office bulletin board. "I had visions of getting a second TV because my apartment would be bulging at the seams with people," he says. Jefferson took down the sheet four days later--after attracting just one signature. "I'm a latecomer to this show," sighs Jefferson. "Now I'm being deserted. Nobody wants to come to my party." ...
  • The Wonder Boom Years

    Money. Television. The bomb. Separately, any would have altered a generation. Together, the unholy trinity conspired to make the childhood of 76 million Americans born between 1946 and 1964 radically different from any that preceded it. In a booming postwar economy, the growing middle class suddenly had disposable income--and they often disposed of it on their offspring. In the first decade after World War II, the toy business nearly tripled; by the late '50s it was a billion-dollar industry. Electronic marketing arrived on a large scale, aimed at a particularly receptive audience: kids hooked on such commercial-laced elixirs as "Howdy Doody" and "Leave It to Beaver. " But above (or beneath) this apparent idyll where father always knew best, there was the threat of Armageddon. At any minute, you, the Beave and your Davy Crockett hat might be vaporized by atomic weapons unleashed by communists. At the National Museum of American History in Washington, a new exhibition, "This Is Your...
  • Not In His Own Words

    As a college freshman, Clayborne Carson attended the 1963 March on Washington, where the Rev. Martin Luther King delivered his now legendary "I have a dream" speech. The Stanford University historian's first book was a study of black awakening in the '60s. When Coretta Scott King asked him to edit and publish her husband's papers in 1985, it was another distinction in a long career of study and personal dedication to the struggle for civil rights. But Carson's scholarship led him to a disturbing discovery, detailed last week in The Wall Street Journal: extensive portions of King's academic writings, including the dissertation for his 1955 doctoral degree from Boston University, had been plagiarized. "Martin Luther King Jr. was a great man," says Carson, "but a careless scholar." ...
  • 'Pouring Money Down A Bad Hole'

    Marxist-led guerrillas are again filtering down from the mountains toward the outskirts of EI Salvador's capital city. But for the first time in 10 years the rightist-dominated government will have to face the rebels with declining support from the United States. Last week President Bush grudgingly signed a 50 percent cut in military aid for EI Salvador voted by Congress. The shift in policy reflects a growing sense in Washington that, with the cold war over, the United States has little stake in the conflict--and little to show for the $4 billion it has already spent on EI Salvador ...
  • Mom, Please Cheer Up

    Please cheer up, Mom. A new report by Boston University's School of Medicine shows that women who are depressed during pregnancy are more than twice as likely to give birth to irritable infants. A study of 1,100 new moms found links between pregnant women who had symptoms of depression and newborns who cried excessively. While unknown variables could cause the crankiness, BU's researchers say hormonal changes or the possibility that depressed mothers treat their babies differently could be to blame.
  • Go West, Young Outfielder

    Darryl Strawberry only wants what every man has wanted since time immemorial: his native soil, the love of his family-and Jose Canseco-type bucks. So maybe now, after eight strife-filled seasons with the New York Mets, he's happy. Last week, with his wife, Lisa, and children Darryl Jr. and Diamond standing by, the Los Angeles native signed a five-year, $20.3 million contract with the Dodgers. To some, this seemed excessive for a .263 lifetime hitter, especially one who has a record of fistfights with teammates, an arrest on weapons charges and Jose Canseco-type sulks. But Dodgers manager Tommy Lasorda thinks Strawberry is a much stronger individual than anyone believes. "This is a guy," says Lasorda, "who can literally carry a team."
  • Surprises From Uncle Sam

    It's no surprise that so many Capitol Hill incumbents won cheers from their constituents last week. After all the Sturm und Drang about spending cuts and tax increases, the politicians blinked. Cuts turned out to be modest; some popular programs like child care got a big leg up and no one laid a glove on the average voter's income-tax return. For most Americans tax rates won't change, nor will exemptions and deductions. Virtually all of the increases affect a tiny minority of taxpayers--the 2.3 percent whose adjusted gross incomes stretch from $100,000 up. ...
  • Letters In The Sand

    They don't sell flowers out in the Sandpile. So one day Pfc. John Duggan, 24, a United States Marine who worked as a nightclub bouncer before turning his attention to Saddam Hussein, picked some dry weeds and mailed them to his fiancee. "These weeds are my roses," he wrote her. And he sent them with his love. ...
  • Looking For Lessons

    Before the polls even opened, presidential spokesman Marlin Fitzwater--the nation's spin doctor in chief--puckishly admitted that the White House would declare a GOP triumph no matter what. Sure enough, Washington strategists were busily snatching victory from the jaws of defeat last week. GOP leaders boasted of inroads into Democratic strongholds, Republican National Committee spokesman Charles Black managed to keep astraight face when he crowed, "It's our best midterm election in decades." Not to be outdone, Democratic National Committee Chairman Ronald Brown declared the ballot "a no-confidence vote" for George Bush, cutting off the president's coattails once and for all. It was, in other words, business as usual among the revisionists on the Potomac. ...
  • Backlash?

    Some liberal Saudis are worried that last week's women's "drive-in" in Riyadh could trigger a backlash in the kingdom. On Nov. 6, 40 Saudi women piled into 15 cars and drove around for half an hour, challenging the Saudi ban on driving licenses for women. The drive-in was primarily the result of frustration: Saudi women generally must rely on their husbands or chauffeurs to get around and that can be quite an inconvenience. While they are generally sympathetic to the cause, many Saudi women doubted that such odd demonstrations are really the best way to change men's minds. Said one woman: "Many of us believe that it is better to work with the system than against it."
  • The Failure Of Feminism

    The other day I had the world's fastest blind date. A Yuppie from Eureka penciled me in for 50 minutes on a Friday and met me at a watering hole in the rural northern California town of Arcata. He breezed in, threw his jammed daily planner on the table and shot questions at me, watching my reactions as if it were a job interview. He eyed how much I drank. Then he breezed out to his next appointment. He had give us 50 minutes to size each other up and see if there was any chance for romance. His exit was so fast that as we left he let the door slam back in my face. It was an interesting slam. ...
  • 'Somebody In Saudi Arabia Loves Me'

    One night last week, more than 300 Army wives and children crowded into a meeting hall at Fort Campbell Ky., desperate for news about U.S. forces in Saudi Arabia. The speaker was Col. Greg Gile, just back from the Persian Gulf. He patiently described everything--from their husbands' diets to a Saudi Sears store. Afterward, the families anxiously gathered around monitors to watch tapes of their soldiers. Every time they saw someone they recognized, the wives hugged. A soldier: "Hi, K.C. I love you and miss you, baby." A wife: "Oh, that's so sweet. Please let my husband be on this." Soldier: "Send me a new watch, 'cause this one's broken." Wife: "Oh Lord, please let my husband be on this." Soldier, holding up rations: "Send food. Look what they feed us. " A wife: "Oh, that's my husband!" She paused. "God, he's gotten so skinny." ...
  • Big Birds! Leapin' Lizards!

    Jurassic Park. By Michael Crichton. 400 pages. Knoph. $19.95.Ever since Dr. Frankenstein lost control of that monster, novelists have been firm on one point: in the hands of the greedy or corrupt, science is a fearsome business. In his new thriller--his best so far--Michael Crichton warns us that we should be afraid, of unregulated genetic engineering in particular. A dotty old multimillionaire has bought a large island off Costa Rica which he has transformed into the world's largest theme park, devoted to dinosaurs. From fossils and giant computers that work out genetic codes, technicians have re-created the real beasts: carnivorous Tyrannosaurs, poison-spitting Dilophosaurs and, most ominous of all alarmingly intelligent Velociraptors. Computers, electrified fences and constant surveillance keep everything under control, of course, and the brutes are all females so family planning can't be a problem. Can it?This island, says a specialist in chaos theory, is "an accident waiting to...
  • India: Gandhi Pulls The Strings, Again

    Being prime minister of India is one of the most thankless jobs in the world--a bit like being mayor of New York City. But for more than 20 years, veteran Indian politician Chandra Shekhar has coveted it. Last week he got his wish--inheriting the vast nation's worst crisis since independence. Shekhar, 63, faces a rising tide of Hindu fundamentalism, separatist violence, caste conflict and skyrocketing food prices. Just what he plans to do about them he's never really said. ...
  • Crimes And Misdemeanors

    Burning Down the House: How greed, Deceit, and Bitter Revenge Destroyed E.F. Hutton. By James Sterngold. 305 pages. Summit. $19.96.Now that this third and latest book on the fall of E.F. Hutton is out, maybe it's time for the movie. How about Jack Nicholson portraying the maniacal Robert M. Fomon character, the CEO whose womanizing, drinking and plotting devours his time? Monty Python's John Cleese could be cast in the Robert Rittereiser role of a befuddled executive addicted to sports metaphors. And Peter Ueberroth, the baseball commissioner and Hutton board member, with an uncanny ability to duck the dirt, could play himself.Business books like "Burning Down the House" face the unhappy prospect of comparison to "Barbarians at the Gate," the huge best seller about the RJR Nabisco takeover. This one, lacking the drama and color of "Barbarians," falls a bit short, too. Yet author James Sterngold, a New York Times reporter, adroitly tells a chilling tale of one of America's best...
  • Made In Japan: Better Baseball

    OK, it was just a "good will" tour--a select team of Japanese baseball players up against a team of professional stars from the United States. Americans weren't supposed to take it seriously, and God knows hardly anyone here--or almost anywhere else--did. There were more important things going on in the world, and as Baseball Commissioner Fay Vincent declared piously: "An exhibition is an exhibition is an exhibition." But long before the series ended Sunday in Tokyo the United States had lost something important--namely the right to say of our Japanese allies, "At least we can kick their butts in one thing." ...
  • Higher Ante

    NEWSWEEK has learned that the U.S. Marines will practice an amphibious assault in the Persian Gulf this week near the border between Saudi Arabia and Kuwait. The exercise will be conducted within range of the Silkworm antiship missiles the Iraqis have positioned at the border against a possible U.S. invasion. U.S. officials say that the operation is not meant to provoke a conflict with Iraq, but Washington wants "intentionally to raise the ante to show we have the capability and we're ready to take it right to their border." If the Iraqis attack, the sources say, U.S. troops will respond with force to protect the Marine battalion.
  • Cities On The Brink

    Every bag of mail these days brings Philadelphia officials new postcards from the edge of insolvency In September a child-care agency under contract to the City of Brotherly Love threatened to drop 150 foster children on the doorstep of the welfare department. The reason: $1 million in unpaid bills. A check was rushed the next day. Two road contractors fed up with late payments, recently walked away from several major street-resurfacing jobs, leaving hundreds of city blocks in rutted disrepair. A repo man visited the police department and hauled away a $32,000 van. Faced with a $229 million deficit. no credit and the prospect of bankruptcy by Christmas, Philadelphia is running on fumes. ...
  • Sitting On The Dock Of The Bay

    They stink, they snore, they slobber. And they're adorable, San Francisco's noisiest waterfront attraction: 150 blubbery, belching male sea lions who've set up housekeeping on K-Dock near Fisherman's Wharf. ...
  • The Voters Speak: Read Our Lips, If You Can

    With 45 education initiatives on ballots in 24 states last week, the public had its best chance this year to speak about education reform. And it responded with I a resounding maybe, showing unmistakable skepticism I about both new reforms and the more conventional tactic of throwing more money at the problem. Most of the balloting was heavily influenced by state and local factors. There was, says Michael Kirst, a professor of education at Stanford University, "no backlash on education." But neither, says Frank Newman, president of the Education Commission of the States, was there any "willingness to do something radical." Here is how several of the most significant initiatives fared: ...
  • How The West Was Lost

    The romantic tradition is alive and well in Hollywood, embodied in the ambitious presence of Kevin Costner. Like Gary Cooper or Jimmy Stewart, he cannily converts self-effacement into a larger-than-life moral statement. The modest ingrown decency of the heroes he played in "Bull Durham," "The Untouchables" and "Field of Dreams" allowed him to reach for the grand gesture without embarrassment. Encased neither in cynicism (like Bruce Willis or Eddie Murphy), superheroic musculature (Schwarzenegger, Stallone) nor dewy youth (Cruise), he's set about reinventing the tradition of diffident nobility. ...
  • The Bush Blueprint Bombs

    That new economic populism Democrats mustered on Nov. 6 has already displayed a revealing diversity. Tuesday's big winners in the South--Florida Governor-elect Lawton Chiles, who ran against big money politics by refusing to take contributions more than $100, and Texas Governor-elect Ann Richards, who criticized George Bush for defending the rich in Washington and then campaigning for a Texas multimillionaire who didn't pay any income taxes in 1986--speak with a familiar, generally centrist, corn-pone accent. ...
  • The Homeless

    Out of bounds: Three Gastonia, N.C., police officers, for allegedly pouring warm cooking oil over some homeless people as they slept outdoors. Following a disciplinary hearing last week, city manager Gary Hicks followed a police department recommendation and fired officers Stacey Trull and David McKinney; officer Timothy Bass had already resigned. Trull has denied wrongdoing, and McKinney and Bass still face criminal-assault charges filed by one of the homeless.
  • Is It Panic Time Or Not?

    Never in recent U.S. history has an economic downturn been so widely advertised--and feared--before it even began. Output may indeed be slipping into reverse; even George Bush last week hinted as much. But the latest numbers still show business advancing. Gross national product rose in the third quarter, and so did industrial production. The jobless rate marked time. So why has consumer confidence suddenly sunk to levels seen only in the depths of harsh recessions (chart)? Are Americans overreacting? Or are the government's numbers not showing how bad things really are? ...
  • It's Not Easy Being Green

    It was going to be quite a conference. "Eco-Glasnost!" promised to bring together the strangest of bedfellows: representatives from industrial giants like 3M, General Electric and Dow and members of The Nature Conservancy, World Wildlife Fund/Conservation Foundation and other groups. Together they would discuss how businesses can protect Mother Earth and make a profit besides. The Florida-based Environmental Institute had set up the two-day forum, and Environmental Protection Agency head William Reilly was on the program. There was one major problem: Eco-Glasnost! flopped. Too few companies signed up and Environmental Institute president John Paling had to cancel the event. ...
  • Moscow's Two-Edged Plowshare

    There aren't many statesmen who have discussed the Persian Gulf crisis in depth with both George Bush and Saddam Hussein. One who has, Soviet envoy Yevgeny Primakov, has become a professional optimist. "I am confident that a peaceful solution is possible," he said last week during a reception in the Kremlin. Soviet sources concede that, after two sessions with the ubiquitous Primakov last month, Saddam shows no sign of actual movement toward a compromise. Even so, the role of peacemaker has paid off handsomely for Primakov and for the Kremlin. ...
  • Big Macs In South Africa?

    While many American companies have kept a high profile in South Africa by franchising arrangements with local white businessmen McDonald's has been conspicuously absent. That may change--to the benefit of black South Africans. Johannesburg sources say McDonald's is considering entering that market by franchising black entrepreneurs once U.S. economic sanctions are lifted. A group of black South Africans has visited McDonald's headquarters and says it received a "positive" response. McDonald's didn't return calls.
  • Who Dares To Be Bare?

    The most talked-about newborn in the dance world these days is the White Oak Dance Project, brainchild of a distinctly odd couple, Mark Morris and Mikhail Baryshnikov. Morris, the preening naughty boy of modern dance celebrated for his idiosyncratic, down-home choreographic style, and Baryshnikov, the greatest male ballet dancer of our time, teamed up to create a small but classy touring company that has been playing to packed houses across the country ever since its recent debut in Boston. Named after the 7,500-acre Florida estate where the dancers rehearsed, White Oak is chiefly a vehicle for Baryshnikov as he winds down his performing career. The challenges in Morris's choreography are nothing like the pyrotechnics that made Baryshnikov a star, and that suits him fine. ...
  • That'll Teach The Rascais

    On the political Richter scale the election registered a measly 3.5. It rattled the crockery but broke little. The electorate was surly last Tuesday. Not as irascible as, say, the woman who sent a wreath to the grave of the heifer that knocked down William Gladstone, but America's voters boxed some ears by reducing many incumbents' margins (in 1988 only 47 House incumbents won with less than 60 percent of the vote; in 1990 106 did), then sent them back inside the Beltway to get to work on getting re-elected. That'll teach the rascals. ...
  • Venom And Violence

    After Mikhail Gorbachev took power in 1985, he wanted nothing more than to be associated with the ideals of Vladimir Ilyich Lenin. Gorbachev's model was Lenin the pragmatist, who could preserve the vision of a socialist utopia while accepting the contributions of private enterprise and markets. This was at least a more realistic Lenin than the deified mummy put on display by Stalin. But you no longer see his heroic portraits in Moscow, and Gorbachev seems to have forgotten his name. Where is Lenin now? Richard Pipes has redefined him for the postcommunist era in The Russian Revolution (944 pages. Knopf. $40), a masterful and timely distillation of Lenin's destructive genius. ...
  • The Wrong Tanks

    NEWSWEEK has learned that one reason President Bush may not force a military showdown with Iraq until December at the earliest: the U.S. troops in Sauti Arabia are equipped with outdated M1 tanks that have no built-in protection against chemical weapons--a major threat in Saddam Hussein's arsenal. More modern M-1A1 tanks, with integral anti-CW air-filter systems, are being shipped to the Persian Gulf from Western Europe where they had been prepositioned against the Soviet Union. Pentagon sources say the Army is sending about 760 M-1A1s, enough to "replace the M1s on a one-for-one basis." ...
  • Goodbye Jerry?

    Whatever the outcome of this week's California gubernatorial race, the news may not be good for former Democratic governor Jerry Brown. Elected state party chairman in 1988, Brown promised to rebuild the party from the grass roots. But Democratic leaders grumble that he's spent too much on media blitzes and not enough on voter registration and get-out-the-vote efforts. Party insiders expect a nuts-and-bolts administrator to replace Brown in 1992. Brown denies that he's spent unwisely.
  • On Madison Avenue, Daddy Sells Best

    He was advertising's man of the '80s. You know, the good-looking businessman rushing from a power lunch to the health club, briefcase in hand, hungering for big-bucks success. You saw him again and again, in TV spots and print ads. Now, like so many icons of the age of excess, it seems the powerbroker image is going the way of Gordon Gekko. Advertising's new male icon for the '90s? Dear old Dad. ...
  • Bad Blood In Germany

    The entrance to the military base at Wunsdorf, headquarters of the Soviet Army in Germany, is known locally as "Little Mexico." As olive-drab transports rumble through the gates and helicopters clatter overhead, soldiers wheel and deal in a booming black market. Conscripts from the Ukraine and Azerbaijan crowd around a red minivan, ogling Japanese VCRs and boom boxes. Polish traders hawk jeans and porno magazines; East Germans swap cigarette lighters and bottles of schnapps for military caps and insignia. More serious business goes on at the train station, just steps away. Reporters from Tempo, a German monthly, recently procured a small arsenal of Soviet weapons--a surface-to-air missile, a Kalashnikov assault rifle, a dozen antitank grenades and an assortment of mines. The price: 6,000 marks--about $4,000. ...
  • You Gotta Have Cart!

    Here's just the thing a teed off golfer needs to get that pokey foursome moving: a cart with a five-foot honker. The Bob Hopemobile was commissioned by the comedian in 1970 for use in his Desert Classic tournament (it also had a run in several of Hope's Texaco commercials). Later this month it will be auctioned off in Newport Beach, Calif, along with a variety of other customized cars built by George Barris, including the original Munster Koach. Those who have a hankering for the Hope cart should expect to blow at least $20,000. That doesn't include gas.
  • Manhattan Cannibals

    Joni Evans is unrelated to Harry Evans, and they are both unrelated to Red Sox outfielder Dwight Evans If those facts are unrelated (or uninteresting) to you, please refrain in the future from gossiping about the gossipy world of New York publishing. It demands attention to such details. ...
  • I Hear America Scratching

    They were at it again last weekend, the flower of America's youth, bent over test papers, scratching in answer boxes as though their lives depended on it. And they did, for this was the inexorable fall ritual known to six decades of students as the college boards. Each year more than 2 million kids take the Scholastic Aptitude Test and companion achievement tests, the scores of which allow admissions offices to decide among the fuzz-faced supplicants at their gates. -Such clout has inevitably brought criticism of the tests' accuracy and fairness. After three years of study by the College Board, a blue-ribbon panel announced changes last week which will significantly alter the exams but stop short of requiring that most frightening of prospects: a mandatory essay. ...
  • The Latin 'Techno-Yuppies'

    What comes to mind when you think of Latin American leaders? A generation ago it would have been right-wing dictators in medal-covered military jackets, molding themselves in the images of Benito Mussolini and Francisco Franco. Or leftists who wore beards like Che Guevara and quoted Castro and Lenin. These days, members of Latin America's governing elites are more likely to wear designer suits and to tap on personal computers. And instead of quoting wild-eyed revolutionaries, they're uttering homes-spun American sales tips. "Your don't get a second chance to make a first impression," says Jorge Quiroga, Bolivia's 30-year-old under secretary of planning. ...
  • Going Against The Grain

    The Iran-Iraq war was still raging when several members of the Iraqi Grain Board paid a visit to De Valls Bluff Ark., three years ago. Describing grain silos blown apart by Iranian shells and severe food shortages, the Iraqi emissaries wanted to know if American farmers could meet their country's rice needs. By last year Iraq was buying 500,000 tons of U.S. rice--half of America's annual export production. The lucrative market vanished this summer, when George Bush imposed a trade embargo on Iraq after Saddam Hussein invaded Kuwait. These days farmers sit around the John Deere showroom in Stuttgart, Ark., bemoaning their plight. "I'll tell you what the problem is," says a rice grower who goes by the name Doopey. "Ain't no money in it." ...