News

News

More Articles

  • A Historic Race Down South

    In the winter of 1963, a TV editorial director named Jesse Helms went on the air to praise the young South Carolina man who had just become Clemson University's first black student. "He has stoutly resisted the pose of a conquering hero for the forces of integration," said Helms. "He simply wants, he says, to be an architect." Harvey Gantt did become an architect but today he wants something more: to be a U.S. senator from North Carolina, and he is running against archconservative Helms the Republican incumbent, for the spot. Defying conventional wisdom that predicted defeat by a white opponent, Gantt swept a June runoff election--becoming the first African-American ever to win a Democratic nomination for the Senate. ...
  • America's Slide Into The Sewer

    I regret the offensiveness of what follows. However, it is high time adult readers sample the words that millions of young Americans are hearing. ...
  • He Left His Briefs Behind

    There's no law that says a guy can't slip out of character now and again. This week actor Alan Rachins, better known as the balding popinjay Douglas Brackman of "L.A. Law," shucks his pinstripes for something more daring. He plays the flamboyant transvestite Albin in a Jupiter, Fla., production of "La Cage Aux Folles." The only thing he's practicing these days is how to walk in size 13C pumps.
  • Congress Passes Judgment On Its Own

    One was greedy, the other used influence to help a lover out of scrapes with the law-and last week colleagues in Congress passed judgment on both men. The Senate Ethics Committee recommended that the full body denounce Sen. Dave Durenberger for pocketing improper book honoraria and fudging his travel expenses. The panel ordered the Minnesota Republican to pay $124,000 in restitution. In the House, the ethics committee voted to reprimand Massachusetts Rep. Barney Frank. Among other transgressions, Frank fixed 33 parking tickets for his former live-in companion, Stephen Gobie. The committee dropped the most damaging charge against the Democrat: that he knew Gobie was running a prostitution ring in the lawmaker's apartment. ...
  • Texas's Lone Stars Team Up

    Purists will be leery of an album as put-together "Texas Tornados," from high concept (Tex-Mex Traveling Wilburys) to cover image (the band, apocalyptically windblown, at a ruined factory) to "Gringo Lingo" glossary ("pesos--Mexican currency"). This supergroup of Texas legends--Freddie Fender, Doug Sahm, Augie Meyers and master accordionist Flaco Jimenez--goes light on Spanish lyrics and heavy on local color, right down to whores with rosaries on the bedpost. They didn't even join forces after jamming all night while drinking Pearl longnecks. A Nashville management company called Sahm after hearing Warner Brothers wanted to bring Tex-Mex to Anglo country radio. ...
  • All Is Not Lost In Cincinnati

    Pete Rose and his entourage left the sentencing room, followed by a pack of reporters carrying cellular telephones. Anyone who took the federal courthouse elevator down during those first frantic moments after Rose, 49, received five months in prison for income-tax evasion got to hear a succession of sportscasters reporting live from the lower, and presumably quieter, floors. "The former Cincinnati Reds star has finally faced the music," a professional radio voice was saying, when the doors opened on six. On four the words "has taken his medicine," dramatically enunciated, drifted into the car. Down in the lobby, someone was actually observing that "life has thrown Charlie Hustle a curve." ...
  • Short Faculties

    Even English majors may be able to get jobs in the '9Os. In a new report by the American Council on Education, 90 percent of U.S. colleges and universities surveyed expressed "concern" about upcoming faculty shortages. Almost two thirds of the schools are already having trouble recruiting for some available positions. Since the Ph.D. glut of the '70s and early '80s, there's been a marked drop in the number of American doctoral candidates. Engineering, math, business and computer science already have faculty shortages; foreign languages and the humanities will soon feel the pinch as professors hired in the 1960s and '60s begin to retire en masse.
  • A Second Chance For Ollie

    Ollie North may soon have another day in court--and be glad for the opportunity. A divided federal appeals court last week suspended all three of North's 1989 convictions in the Irna-contra case and overturned one of them. Most significant, the panel ordered Judge Gerhard Gesell to conduct an exhaustive "witness by witness" inquiry into whether North's trial was impermissibly tainted by the use of earlier testimony he gave Congress under a grant of immunity from prosecution. If the answer is yes, the former National Security Council aide could be entitled to a new trial. "My family and I have been under virtual assault for more than 3 1 / 2 years in this extraordinary legal battle," said North. "I hope the independent counsel will end it now." ...
  • The Remaking Of The President

    Presidential libraries tend to reflect the presidents they memorialize. Lyndon Johnson's in Austin, Texas, is massive and overbearing. John F. Kennedy's in Boston is a soaring white mausoleum by the sea. Harry Truman's in Independence, Mo., is plain and modest; in retirement, Truman liked to surprise schoolchildren by giving tours himself. ...
  • Paying For Time

    The mob has always had a fondness for payback. It's only fitting, then, that U.S. district Judge T. F. Gilroy Daly of New Haven, Conn., over thee last month has ordered six Gambino crime-family mobsters to pay the costs of their incarceration. The six had just been convicted of racketeering activity and given terms ranging from 27 to 96 months. The annual tab for each jailbird: $16,987.
  • A Master Builder

    It was one of those exquisite accidents I that shape history. In May 1956, U.S. I Attorney General Herbert Brownell assembled a conference on court congestion. Arthur Vanderbilt, chief justice of the New Jersey Supreme Court and the nation's chief advocate of unclogging the dockets, was to be the keynote speaker. But when Vanderbilt fell ill two days before the meeting, he prevailed on a favorite younger colleague to stand in. His name was William J. Brennan Jr. Brennan looked over Vanderbilt's notes and then spoke off the cuff. He was a hit. Four months later, when Sherman Minton of the U.S. Supreme Court announced his retirement, Brownell recommended Brennan to President Dwight Eisenhower, in part because his demographics--a Democrat and a Roman Catholic from the Northeast- would help Ike in the upcoming '66 election. It hardly seemed likely that the 50-year-old Brennan would go on to become a beacon of liberalism. The conservative Eisenhower figured it out soon enough. When asked...
  • The Bush Court

    With Brennan's retirement, the president can build a conservative majority. But he faces a bitter fight in the Senate that could cost him politically. ...
  • Death In A Starring Role

    Silent-movie director William Desmond Taylor would be nothing more than footnote fodder had he not died in 1922 with a bullet in his back. For nearly 70 years, people have been trying to figure out who killed this respectable middle-aged bachelor and why. His body was hardly cold before the rumors had him linked with two famous actresses, comedienne Mabel Normand and aging child star Mary Miles Minter. Pornographic photos were said to be found in his bungalow, along with a nightie--panties in some versions--with the initials MMM. None of that was ever substantiated, but it's this ocean of conjectural murk that gives an otherwise tame case its allure. ...
  • An Experience Of Captivity

    Water trickles among the trees, seeking with its unerring instinct for declivity the drains and sumps hidden in the forest floor. Water in its heaviness pools in the lichen-lined hollows, or, crystalline, falls as snow on refrigerated rocks. Then the path spirals between walls of green water, into the cool darkness sidelit by the pale glow of light passing through its translucent, bubble-flecked depths. ...
  • Vote Early And Very, Very Often

    Out of bounds: Cincinnati financier Carl Lindner, for shamelessly hyping self-promoter Donald Trump. USA Today conducted a "Trump hot line" last month where readers could vote on whether Trump symbolizes "what makes the U.S.A. a great country" or typifies the "things that are wrong with this country." The results: 5,215 out of 7,802-or 81 percent--of the callers were pro-Trump. The problem is, 5,640 votes came from a subsidiary of Lindner's American Financial Corp. A Lindner spokesman says employees made the calls because they admired Trump's "entrepreneurial spirit."
  • Pipe Dream

    Even as some states have enacted very strict smoking rules in restaurants some defiant eateries are rallying to the defense of serious addicts. The latest is Yuca, an upscale restaurant in Coral Gables, Fla. Mondays are "Cigar and pipe Smokers' Nights" there. But the real trendsetter may have been Los Angeles's Ma Maison, which has a "Cigar Night" on the first Monday of every month. Then again, nonsmokers there get a break: the restaurant opens a sliding roof over the cigar smokers.
  • Cross Talk

    Democratic polltaker Patrick Caddell is winning high praise in unlikely circles these days: Republican congressmen. Caddell, recently invited by GOP strategist Ed Rollins to speak at the Capitol Hill Club, warned the legislators that the public's anger about the weak economy, the congressional pay raise and the S&L crisis will hurt more incumbents--who are primarily Democrats--this November than is now predicted. Caddell said voters see Washington as "irrelevant" to solving the nation's problems and he called the S&L crisis "America's domestic Vietnam." "He was absolutely brilliant," said Republican National Committee chief of staff Mary Matalin.
  • Rebels Without A Cause

    Liberia's deadly guerrilla war is a battle of simple revenge and tribal bragging rights, not politics ...
  • The Bad, The Beautiful And The Brutal

    The weapons are only bows and arrows; the landscape frozen arctic wastes; the technology defiantly low tech--sleds and axes and crude Laplander tepees. Yet the action scenes in Pathfinder have an impact and excitement that's strangely missing in the machine-gun mayhem of many Hollywood blockbusters. This Norwegian film, spoken in Lapp and directed by the first-timer Nils Gaup, puts the sting back into death. ...
  • 'The Jewish Hong Kong'

    In Tel Aviv, homeless protesters overturned garbage cans and smashed shop windows. Demonstrators in Bat Yam threw firebombs from the roof of the city hall and burned tires. In Jerusalem, residents of one of the tent cities that have sprung up around the country threatened to storm the nearby Knesset. Sitting in a stifling tent there with her 18-month-old daughter last week, Sinaia Arish, 23, shooed away flies and explained how she and her jobless husband, a cook, had been evicted from their $370-amonth apartment. Because of a housing shortage caused by the influx of Soviet Jews, she said, rents have Shot up by as much as 100 percent in the last six months. On unemployment benefits of $570 a month, the Arishes can't afford a new apartment. "We just want equal rights with the Soviet immigrants," she said. ...
  • Another Japanese Challenge For Big Blue

    The Japanese computer giant Fujitsu has made no secret of its desire for global clout--but even most hightech watchers were shocked by last week's bombshell. According to press reports in London and Tokyo, Fujitsu was about to buy controlling interest in the mainframe maker JCL, Britain's technological crown jewel and the most profitable computer firm in Europe. The proposed $400 million deal could profoundry alter the shape of Europe's computer industry--and intensify fears about Japan's growing might. Said one U.S. computer-industry executive: "It [would be] a watershed event in the commercial history of Europe." ...
  • Swapping Debt For Knowledge

    It's hard to conceive of any good coming of the $1.3 trillion that less developed nations owe to foreign banks and other lenders. The interest payments alone stifle the impoverished countries' economics and, with virtually no foreign exchange, most debtors haven't a prayer of meeting payments on the principal. But in 1987 a clever conservationist figured out how to turn this financial albatross into a golden-egg-laying goose. Environmental groups started buying Third World debt from banks for a fraction of its face value and donating the notes back to the debtor country. In exchange, that nation shows its good will by establishing nature preserves or hiring ecologists, often by selling bonds to investors. Now the debt swap is being expanded into causes beyond merely saving the planet. ...
  • Baker's About-Face On Cambodia

    Now no place seems safe. With Khmer Rouge troops advancing toward Phnom Penh in units of several hundred men each, the capital is becoming vulnerable. For the first time in the 11-year guerrilla war against the Vietnamese-backed government of Cambodia, refugees are flowing into the capital. Early this month a Western relief worker driving 60 miles outside the city turned back after watching rebels ambush a government truck. A week ago Khmer Rouge troops attacked a passenger train 40 miles north of Phnom Penh, then killed at least 30 passengers they linked to the government. ...
  • Meanwhile, Back In Cajun Country

    Louisiana's Cajun music is driven by the sound of the diatonic accordion: like a harmonica (and unlike the standard piano accordion) it has only enough notes to play in two major keys. The Tex-Mex button accordion has a mellower, fleeter sound than the reedy Cajun instrument, with its organlike stops. But, as a new anthology from the Country Music Foundation shows, what Cajuns lose in fluidity they gain in funk. ...
  • Justice Stands Trial

    Someone has murdered--and probably raped--the sexy, ambitious prosecutor Carolyn Polhemus (Greta Scacchi). The chief prosecuting attorney (Brian Dennehy) needs a culprit fast, or it may cost him the upcoming election. So he turns the case over to his protege, Rusty Sabich (Harrison Ford), a dedicated, clamped-down prosecutor and family man. There's a problem, however, a big one. Sabich had had a tempestuous affair with the victim, and the evidence it's his job to gather suggests he's the one who should be prosecuted. Soon the tables of justice are turned, and the attorney is standing trial for a crime of passion he has to prove he didn't commit. ...
  • The Priest And The Rabbi

    Christians and Jews have talked about one another for centuries. Recently, however, they have begun to talk with one another. A year ago Rabbi Leon Klenicki of the Anti-Defamation League . and Lutheran theologian Richard John I Neuhaus published a cordial conversation on social and political issues that divide the two faiths. And last month Elie Wiesel and New York's Cardinal John O'Connor published a breezy dialogue on the Holocaust, anti-Semitism,.world peace and other subjects. Now, in a longer and more substantive exchange, Father Andrew Greeley and Rabbi Jacob Neusner interpret Scripture to each other in a spirited effort to isolate where Jews and Catholics agree--and differ--about the word of God. ...
  • From Rambo To Riches

    It was the kind of action script that Hollywood loves, featuring a love triangle between a coke-snorting, trigger-happy cop and two bisexual women. Yet not even screenwriter Joe Eszterhas, whose hits include "Flashdance" and "Jagged Edge," could have envisioned the bidding war that erupted after his agent put "Basic Instinct" up for auction last month. The winner? Independent Carolco Pictures Inc., which snatched up the property for an astonishing $3 million--nearly $1.26 million more than the next highest price paid for a "spec" script this year. ...
  • A Romantic Revolution

    He's a high-stakes roller in search of the ultimate card game. She's married to an aristocratic revolutionary. It's not your typical boy-meets girl, but "Havana," starring Robert Redford and Lena Olin ("Enemies, A Love Story"), promises to be something of a "romantic thriller," says producer Sydney Pollack. "It's about two outsiders whose lives are changed by the Cuban revolution." Shot in Santo Domingo, and due out December, the film follows the lovers for eight days--from Christmas Eve to New Year's Day--through the dying gasp of the opulent, sensual playground of pre-Castro Cuba.
  • Gold Rush

    If a good start is everything, then the '92 U.S. Olympic bobsledding team is headed downhill fast. During recent qualifying trials held at Lake Placid N.Y., veteran driver Brian Shimer got a big boost from L.A. Raider Willie Gault, Minnesota Viking Herschel Walker and medal-winning hurdler Edwin Moses. Push come to shove, they aim to be the most awesome starting lineup ever.
  • Battling Over The Almighty Beaver

    Sometimes a species other than man plays God with the ecological balance. To build a dam on the Truckee River in downtown Reno, Nev., a phalanx of 120 beavers ravaged a two-mile stretch of cottonwood trees, extending to the outskirts of town. By damaging 90 percent of the trees, the beavers endangered the homes of 135 species of birds and 40 species of mammals, as well as countless fish that rely on the shade to survive in the summer heat. Conservationists demanded action. But when wildlife biologists suggested extermination, other activists put pressure on state officials. "I made it very clear that it was my desire that they exhaust every conceivable option before extermination," says Gov. Bob Miller. "Only the Almighty has the ultimate determination." ...
  • Body Count Ii

    Action movies are inevitably bloodbaths. But more importantly, the sequels, aside from being less entertaining, often have twice the number of corpses as their predecessors. Why show another car wreck when you can blow up a jumbo jet? Here's a look at this year's crop: Movie Original Sequel DIE HARD 15 162 ROBOCOP 27 58 48 HRS. 9 20
  • Remembrance Of Ads Past

    Don't be alarmed if you're watching TV one of these days and you suddenly hear a familiar question: "Where's the beef?" Or if an announcer's booming voice declares, "Takes a licking, keeps on ticking." You're not suffering from deja vu. You're witnessing the latest trend in advertising: retro ads. More and more advertisers are turning to successful campaigns from the past to give a lift to sales today. Maypo cereal has revived the slogan "I want my Maypo." And bubbly voices are once again singing "Riunite on ice, Riunite that's nice." Companies are so high on the past that they'll sometimes go to almost any length to re-create it. Coca-Cola hired a detective agency to track down the folks who 20 years ago gathered on a hillside to sing "I'd Like to Buy the World a Coke." ...
  • Quayle Gets A Confidence Vote

    Maybe the pundits were wrong. In a survey of 48 state GOP chairmen, Washingtonian magazine reports this week that 35--or 73 percent--said the vice president should remain as George Bush's running mate in 1992 (two chairmen didn't respond). This is a vindication of sorts for the vice president and might signal a dampening of the dump-Quayle talk that has circulated since 1988. Quayle was roundly praised by the leaders for fund raising, drawing crowds and supporting local Republicans. Two votes apiece went to James Baker, Elizabeth Dole and Dick Cheney; Jack Kemp and Bob Dole each got one nod. But Quayle's runner-up, with 5 votes, was "no preference."
  • Will There Be A 51St Star?

    Puerto Ricans debate whether they can join the United States and maintain their cultural identity ...
  • Time In A Bottle

    Veteran sailor Tom McClean, 47, won't be hitting the bottle for the next 28 days. He'll be riding in it. The Scotsman left New York for England in a motorized 37-foot jug last Tuesday to raise money for children's charities. Provisions for the voyage include 30 cans of beans and 50 pounds of chocolate. He'll need the extra kick; the floating flagon only goes 6 mph.
  • Ways To Win

    With a record number of women candidates this year, the National Women's Political Caucus has put together a practical "Guide to Winning in the '9Os." Among the tips: Get press in ways men can't. Women candidates are more "visually arresting" at traditionally male job locations such as construction sites;Don't smoke in public;Cut back on alcohol. You don't need the calories, the drain on your energy or the reputation as a lush;Don't cry in public. If you start to feel overly emotional, take a deep breath; Schedule as many debates with a male opponent as possible. It's hard for male candidates to find a politically appropriate response to strong women.
  • Government From Below?

    After his landslide defeat in Nicaragua's presidential elections last February, Sandinista leader Daniel Ortega rallied his diehards with a vow to "govern from below." Last week Nicaraguans got a taste of what he meant: a violent general strike led by a Sandinista labor federation paralyzed Managua. For two days the capital teetered on the edge of civil war. Armed Sandinista workers built barricades from the same paving stones they used in the 1979 insurrection against dictator Anastasio Somoza. They traded gunfire, bricks and Molotov cocktails with progovernment forces. When the fighting subsided, four people lay dead and dozens were injured. ...
  • The Right To Die In Dignity

    Americans are confused by the Supreme Court's decision that Nancy Cruzan, a 32-year-old Missouri woman who has been in a coma since a car accident seven years ago, must remain tethered to a feeding tube indefinitely. You might assume that the decision was based on a slim chance that she would one day recover, but it wasn't. Everyone agrees that she will never wake up. Instead, the court denied Nancy's parents the right to remove the feeding tube because Nancy failed to leave clear instructions that this is what she would want. Careless of her. Without such instructions the court saw no reason to override the Missouri court's presumption that people would prefer being vegetables to being dead. although it's hard to find anyone who would. ...
  • Man Makes The Clothes

    Like Michelangelo's David, the statues" muscular forms show off the glory of the male body. But these aren't sculptures of ancient gods or idealized Biblical heroes. They're fully jointed window mannequins designed by artist Lowell Nesbitt for Pucci Manikins of New York--made to reflect the new pumped-up, gym-chiseled man of the '9Os. The mannequins, which are at least one size larger--and much more macho--than the traditional department-store variety, will be introduced at Dayton Hudson's Midwestern stores in the fall. Now, that's the way to sell a swimsuit.
  • A Longing For Liberty

    It was a week of ferment below the Sahara. In the Kenyan capital of Nairobi, a protest against one-party rule ended in looting and at least 20 deaths. From Somalia came reports of government troops opening fire in a soccer stadium after fans stoned the president; 66 people were confirmed dead. Liberian ruler Samuel K. Doe was under rebel siege in his seafront mansion. Meanwhile, in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, African heads of state ended the annual Organization of African Unity summit by pledging full democratization. The leaders were forced to acknowledge a new reality in sub-Saharan Africa. Inspired by the revolutions in Eastern Europe and angry at chronic corruption and economic mismanagement, their people are calling for an end to the authoritarian regimes that have ruled them, in many cases, since independence. ...
  • When Life Imitates Bart

    Who said Bart Simpson was white, anyway? In fact, he's kind of mustard-colored. So perhaps it's not surprising that, no sooner had official Simpson products become all the rage when a black version of the cartoon character began popping up on T-shirts from coast to coast. Sometimes this new Bart is funny, as when he appears in Rastafarian dreadlocks, saying, "The Simpsons go funky reggae." Sometimes, as a Michael Jordanesque "Air Bart," he's supercool. Frequently, he's got black power on his mind ("Knowledge is the Key") or Nelson Mandela by his side. ...
  • Pedaling To The Next Century

    On the theory that any activity involving gel-filled shorts can't be dismissed lightly, let us now look into the world of long-distance bicycling. A boom is going on there, big time. ...
  • The Mind Of The Rapist

    A startling rise in sex crimes and the notoriety of cases like the Central Park jogger give new urgency to the question: why do men rape? ...
  • A Future For The Futurists

    Inside the Chicago futures markets, the trading pits can be a Hadean whirl of flailing hands and screaming orders. And for the last three years, events outside the exchange have been just about as dizzying. Ever since the stock-market crash of 1987 everywhere the Chicago Board of Trade and the Chicago Mercantile Exchange turned, it seemed someone was coming after them. The stock markets blamed Chicago for their volatility. The Justice Department accused their traders of winking at widespread fraud. As Chicago looked to defend itself at home, overseas markets jumped into the futures business. ...
  • More Clear Air?

    Smokers beware. New Jersey Sen. Frank Lautenberg, the Transportation subcommittee chairman who engineered the smoking ban on airliners, has a new target: airport terminals. Lautenberg aides say he has no formal plan yet, but sources close to the senator say his goal is to get rid of the dense wall of smoke passengers now often face when they step off smoke-free planes. It's not clear how such a ban would affect terminal restaurants or bars, but they might become the only oases left for that last puff before boarding.
  • The Saudis Say Hello To China

    Saudi Arabia, which hasn't recognized a communist bloc country since the 1930s, will establish full diplomatic relations with China this week, NEWSWEEK has learned. The arrangement was worked out earlier this month in Beijing by the Saudis' ambassador to Washington, Prince Bandar bin Sultan. Two years ago, Prince Bandar negotiated a deal for the sale of Chinese DF-3 intermediate-range missiles to the Saudis. The Saudis' decision to recognize China is an "adjustment to the post-cold-war world," said a source close to the Saudi throne. The Saudis see China as a lucrative market for petrochemicals. They also want to protect the interests of China's sizable Muslim populations.
  • Summer Reading Peripicks

    Face it: Flaubert and Moliere do not go well with coconut oil and sno-cones. It's time again for easy beach reading. Some books--Dominick Dunne's "An Inconvenient Woman" or Slim Keith's memoirs--are a notch above trashy, of course. Here's Peri's ratings of some that are not: (****)Dark Angel Sally Beauman's page-turner features incest, patricide, suicide, voyeurism. The only likable character is Bertie, the Newfoundland dog.(**)Twins In Roxanne Pulitzer's world everyone is tall, tan, narrow-tripped, longlegged, muscular, sexy. Designer labels outnumber cliches--barely.(*)A House in the Hamptons Another sizzling cover, lots of hot, hot romance and insufferable greedheads. But. Why. Does. Author. Gloria. Nagy. Write. Like. This?(***)Malibu Pat Booth's latest gets big points for steamy cover and wins the Celebrity Name-dropping Award hands down. That's all it will ever win.
  • Stark Raving Madchester

    All over England--and now, the rest of Europe as well--in open fields and cavernous clubs, in two-bedroom terrace houses and airplane hangars, dance mania has broken loose. Kids who weren't even born during the psychedelic '60s are slipping into paisley skirts and bell-bottom jeans and heading for updated love-ins known as "raves." Scrubbed and mellow and often stoned out of their gourds, their Monkeys haircuts bobbing and their bright, baggy clothes flopping, they dance until dawn to the untiring pulse of drum machines. "We're all happy people now. We all love each other and dancing," says Danny Kelly, deputy editor of the London-based rock-and-roll weekly New Musical Express. "This is the most important music since punk." ...
  • Fall Of The Marionettes

    In the 1980s, dozens of entrepreneurs built empires with Michael Milken pulling the strings. Now that the junk czar is gone, many have foundered. ...
  • A Scotland Yard For Crimes Against Animals

    It was a big case, one of the biggest the sleuths at the National Fishand Wildlife Forensics Laboratory had ever seen--109 live elk shipped from a New Mexico ranch to an antler farm in Canada last I fall. The task: to prove, as wildlife officials suspected, that the elk had been illegally baited from state lands onto the ranch. The solution: a harmless powder that, when consumed, makes the elk's urine glow under ultraviolet light. Game officers applied the powder to hay left out on public lands and then, weeks; later, seized the shipment of animals for examination. The result: 20 indictments in what the feds now call the Pee Glow Elk case. ...
  • A Scandal In The Cloister

    For years, Allan Boesak helped breathe life into South Africa's antiapartheid movement with his fiery speeches. But last week, when he announced his resignation as a minister in the Dutch Reformed Mission Church, it was with tears of personal anguish. "This is one of the darkest days of my life," he told grieving worshipers at his church in Bellville South, a mixed-race suburb of Cape Town. Boesak, 44, said he intended to give up the position he had held for the past 15 years after an Afrikaans-language newspaper, Die Burger, reported that he was having an affair with a married woman, Johannesburg television producer Elna Botha. Boesak admitted that his 21-year marriage had been failing "for some time now," but insisted that "nothing immoral" had taken place between him and Botha. Boesak's wife, Dorothy, was more blunt. "I think it is just a sickness among men over 40," she told the Cape Times. ...
  • Blond Bomber

    The Material Girl appears to have fallen out of Vogue, at least in Italy. Lukewarm ticket sales, a canceled performance in Rome and protests plagued Madonna last week, after Catholic groups labeled her act blasphemous. Temporarily subdued, Madonna invited fair-minded Catholics to see her show and then judge for themselves. But not enough of the fair-minded showed up. Scalpers reportedly sold tickets at and below cost.
  • Buzzwords

    When Periscope asked the snooty Maidstone Club in East Hampton, Long Island, for beach buzzwords, they said, "Our lifeguards don't use slang. You'd better try the public beaches." A sampling of lifeguard-speak from around the country: Overly earnest lifeguard who isn't any fun.Compulsive body-builders.Swimmer who gets banged up in the undertow.Men's bikini-style bathing suit.Swimmer without the bod for the beach. Also, "stone."Like it sounds. Also, a "potential," as in, "We've got a potential out by the rocks."Choppy waters. No swimming. Bikini-clad bathing beauty.
  • Jesse: A Capitol Office?

    Can Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell say no to Jesse Jackson? Jackson, who is running for the post of "shadow senator" from the District of Columbia, is already asking for an office on Capitol Hill and access to the Senate floor if he wins. Jackson is one of several candidates for the two unpaid, nonvoting Senate seats created by the city council early this year to lobby for D.C. statehood. "I would be shocked beyond shock if Mitchell rolls over on this," says a key Democratic aide. Jackson has made D.C. statehood his cause and he's favored to be elected in November. If he's granted floor privileges, Democrats fear he won't limit his lobbying to statehood. They think Mitchell would, in effect, create a bully pulpit for Jackson. Mitchell aides say he hasn't made a decision, but Democratic Party officials don't expect him to cave in to Jackson.