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  • An Accident-Prone Army

    NEWSWEEK has learned that there were three times more U.S. casualties from "friendly fire" or accidents during last winter's Panama invasion than the Pentagon has previously admitted. What's more, according to a confidential Pentagon report obtained by NEWSWEEK, the Joint Chiefs of Staff kept Defense Secretary Dick Cheney's aides in the dark about the losses. ...
  • Flippant Style, Trivial Pursuits

    With a chip on his shoulder the size of the stature he has frittered away, George Bush is going campaigning. He wants more Republican congressmen so he will not again have to endure the excruciating process that produced the anemic budget deal. But most Republicans opposed the deal; Bush counted on hordes of Democrats to pass it. And who held the stiletto at his throat when he embraced both the "summit" and the deal? ...
  • Punching Iron

    It's just as well that Buster Douglas had to give up the heavyweight-championship belt--it probably didn't fit him anyway. At 246 pounds, the man who toppled Mike Tyson was the second heaviest champ ever, giving challenger Evander Holyfield, at a lithe 208, the upper hand in their title bout in Las Vegas last week. Holyfield KO'd Douglas with a right to the face in the third round, sending
  • Short Tours

    How long can U.S. troops withstand the rigors of the Saudi Arabian desert? To find out, Defense Secretary Dick Cheney recently dispatched an Army psychologist, a social anthropologist and a social worker to the front. Their findings are secret, but a Pentagon source says the team concluded that for frontline combat troops, "six months out there in the weeds is enough." Support troops in the rear areas. who enjoy more of the comforts of home, can cope with the desert environment and the puritanical Saudi culture for about a year, they concluded. Cheney will use the team's report to set up new troop-rotation schedules.
  • The Curse Of 911

    The three digits have become synonymous with dramatic, hairbreadth rescues. The association extends even to prime time, where each week millions of television viewers tune into "Rescue: 911" to see emergency calls re-enacted with documentary realism. Young children save their comatose mothers, and alert neighbors and canny police dispatchers become heroes. What audiences don't see is what happened in Houston one evening last week, when officer Sam Kennedy was dispatched to a house on the city's near north side. He arrived to find a woman on her front porch clad only in a robe, smoking a cigarette and so drunk she could barely talk. There was no emergency. The wasted trip was more than an irritant for Kennedy--it kept him from responding quickly to two serious calls later, one of them an armed robbery. This wasn't the occasional crank. Officials estimate that only a fraction of the nearly 1 million 911 calls Houston police answered last year--10 to 30 percent--were life-threatening...
  • Young, Gifted And Jobless

    They all had a dream, once upon a time. It went something like this: good grades, the right schools, perhaps even an M.B.A. Then, after a few hard years of 12-hour days and total loyalty to the company, they would get the big prize--a hefty salary leading someday to a comfortable retirement. Now that dream of job security is like so many other youthful fantasies, just a memory. It has been replaced by job anxiety, a scary new vision filled with euphemisms like restructuring, down-sizing and streamlining. Even respected members of once stable professions--banking, insurance, the law--have felt the ax. ...
  • Indelicacies

    Black New York Times staffers were offended by remarks made by executive editor Max Frankel at a symposium on women in the media. "I know that when a woman screws up, it is not a political act for me to go fire them. I cannot say that with some of our blacks," Frankel said, echoing a familiar belief in the media. "They're still precious, they're still hothouse in management, and if they are less than good, I would probably stay my hand at removing them too quickly." Frankel later told black journalists that, even though he tripped over his "fat lips," the Times has no double standard.
  • Zombies Redux

    Here they come again, still lurching uninvited from the trees and still without an explanation. With Tom Savini directing, George A. Romero has produced a remake of his first horror classic, Night of the Living Dead, apparently to square himself with the women's movement. Gone is the baffled blonde who sinks into catatonia when her brother is killed by a zombie. In her place is Patricia Tallman, an armed maiden who screams for no more than half an hour before (like Sigourney Weaver in "Alien") stripping off her outer shirt and grabbing a gun to face the monsters down. If one frontal assault won't stop these surging zombies, maybe another will. ...
  • A Tizzy

    Illinois Democrats are in a tizzy over the U.S. Supreme Court decision last week allowing the all-black Harold Washington Party on the November ballot. Blacks have voted more than 90 percent Democratic in recent Illinois elections but the Washington Party now could dilute that vote. Hardest hit might be underdog gubernatorial candidate Neil Hartigan, who was gaining ground against GOP secretary of state Jim Edgar. The Washington Party targeted Hartigan because its leaders claim he snubbed the late Chicago mayor--and party namesake--Harold Washington. It also spells trouble for Chicago Mayor Richard M. Daley if the party fields a strong candidate against him in
  • Back In The Games Again?

    Zane Moosa was born to an Indian father and a mixed-race mother in September 1968, just five days after Prime Minister John Vorster prohibited a visit by an English cricket club with a mixed-race South African on its roster. The ban provoked a boycott that has isolated South Africa from the sports world ever since. For most athletes of Moosa's generation, international competition once seemed a prospect almost as remote as a black government in Pretoria. But President F. W. de Klerk's reforms have got Moosa, a star midfielder for the Mamelodi Sundowns soccer club, thinking about a day when a South African eleven will compete in a future World Cup round. "We don't talk about it much, but I hope it can be soon," says Moosa. "It would be an honor for [our fans] just to see us play internationally." ...
  • For Americans, A Sinking Feeling

    In the Christian Lacroix boutique on the posh Rue du Faubourg Saint-Honore in Paris last week, three Japanese clients were waiting in line to pay for their purchases. Outside, an American woman snapped a photograph of the famous designer's shop. The scene was a perfect metaphor for a sober reversal of roles: these days the Americans are on the outside looking in. The American retailers in Paris for the spring/summer fashion collections were feeling the pinch of growing economic troubles. Everyone talked of tough times: recession, the softness of the dollar (it was about five francs to a dollar last week, compared with more than six last season), the crisis in the gulf and the virtual collapse of large retail profits. "I'm seeing a lot of unhappy faces," said Gene Pressman, vice president of Barneys, a New York specialty store. ...
  • Please Return The Word Gay

    It is of the least possible concern to me what homosexuals do with one another in the privacy of their homes. They can play house, plot political strategies or couple anonymously--I really don't care. I'm not offended and I wouldn't try to stop them if I could. But I want the word "gay" back. "Gay" used to be an extremely useful word. It showed up frequently in poetry and prose--Shakespeare used it 12 times--in part because it has no precise synonym. The general sense of the word is a combination of joyous, mirthful, bright, exuberant, cheerful, sportive, merry, light-hearted, lively, showy and pleasant. ...
  • Whose Art Is It, Anyway?

    The hulking monolith going up next to Occidental Petroleum headquarters in Los Angeles looks more like a mausoleum than a museum. And in a way, it is. The Armand Hammer Museum of Art and Cultural Center, scheduled to open in November, will be the lasting memorial of the 92-year-old oil tycoon, wheeler-dealer, friend of Soviet leaders since Lenin, adviser to princes and presidents. It will house his collection of old masters and impressionist art--estimated to be worth as much as $400 million--including a stunning Rembrandt, 6,000 Daumier drawings and lithographs and two van Goghs. (Comparing the value of his extravagantly floral van Gogh, "Hospital at Saint-Remy," with the famous "Irises, " Hammer remarked, "I've got the whole garden.") "I made most of my fortune here in Los Angeles," says the energetic chairman of Occidental. "I feel that I ought to give back something to the city." ...
  • Buzzwords

    Travel agents speak in code even when they're not talking to their computers: Camper: Client who travels so often his or her file never leaves the agent's desk.Grinder: Client who asks one difficult question after another.Shopper: Customer who calls different agencies looking for the best fare, but doesn't book.Nonrev: Nonrevenue passenger, such as an airline employee, who flies for free.Fam: Familiarization tour for travel agents, usually to some trendy new location. Designer package: Vacation for client who leads custom-tailored lifestyle.
  • The Return To Love Canal

    Would you live near a storage site that contains 22,000 tons of toxic wastes? That is the question prospective home buyers are asking, now that the government has approved the resettlement of Love Canal, the nation's most notorious toxic-waste dump. The first 10 of 236 houses will go on sale in Love Canal on Aug. 15--and the list of eager buyers already totals 204. "If it turns out to be reasonable and affordable, I'll be in there," says Gary Bowen, who is looking to move in with his wife and baby daughter. "It's a nice area with solid houses and big yards." ...
  • Bad News For Silent Sam?

    House investigators this week will broaden the allegations against former secretary of Housing and Urban Development Samuel Pierce. NEWSWEEK has learned that a bipartisan majority of the House Government Operations subcommittee will ask the special prosecutor investigating the HUD scandal to look into new evidence that Pierce may have steered housing grants to clients of Battle Fowler, the law firm where he worked before joining the Reagan administration and where he was expected to return. This is the first allegation that while at HUD Pierce took steps that could have benefited him personally. The subcommittee, chaired by Democratic Rep. Tom Lantos of California, will also ask the special prosecutor to consider if Pierce committed perjury during his testimony before the panel. Pierce's lawyer vehemently denies the allegations, and a Battle Fowler spokesman says the firm is "not aware of any inappropriate conduct" by its members.
  • A New Menu To Heal The Heart

    Like 40 million other Americans, Robert Royall has heart disease. Back in 1986 Royall, then 49, learned that one of his coronary I arteries was 37 percent blocked, seriously impeding the blood flow to his heart. On his doctor's advice he began following the regimen recommended by the American Heart Association: he reduced the fat in his diet to 30 percent of total calories, cut his dietary cholesterol to 300 mg a day and started exercising. A year later the blockage had increased to 77 percent. So Royall took more drastic measures. He enrolled in a research program run by Dr. Dean Ornish of the University of California, San Francisco, that demanded he adopt a new way of life. His new diet was almost entirely vegetarian with a third as much fat as the AHA recommended. Along with regular exercise, he practiced stress-reduction techniques, including meditation. A year later the blockage in his artery had been reduced to 59 percent, while blood flow through the artery had nearly tripled...
  • Feast Of The S&L Vultures

    Okay S&L scandal watchers, here's a quick quiz that should make you even angrier about the thrift crisis: ...
  • Sound Too Good To Be True?

    Rob Gregory wanted to do better at his job selling used factory-ventilation systems in Kansas City. So three years ago he bought a "subliminal" audiotape called "Unconditional Love." All Gregory heard was "some synthesized music and weird gongs." But buried beneath the sounds, supposedly, were inaudible messages subconsciously persuading him to feel better about other people. It worked, he says. His sales went up because "people sense if you really care." Encouraged, he bought another tape, this one called "Stop Hair Loss." He says he soon stopped losing his hair. Now Gregory, 30, owns 15 different improvement tapes--none of whose "hidden" messages he can hear. "Subliminals are both practical and spiritual, " he says. "They're a smorgasbord for human potential." ...
  • When Photographs Lie

    If the Empire State Building hadn't been moved, it would have stuck out of the sportscaster's head. So Gil Cowley, former art director for New York's WCBS-TV, had the landmark building shifted four blocks uptown on the huge skyline backdrop photo he built for his anchor set. His tool was a Quantel Graphic Paintbox, just one of several computer technologies that are changing the face of photography. "It's just so easy to manipulate images and objects for the effect you want," Cowley says. That's wonderful for art and advertising. But with more than 700 companies now possessing advanced electronic-imaging systems, the implications for photojournalism are scary. ...
  • 'You Just Get On It And Go'

    It all started one balmy day as I sat on the park bench in our driveway and watched my son demonstrate the fine art of balancing on his skateboard. I watched him | with envy. I had never had a skateboard when I was growing up. In my day we kept our feet firmly planted on the ground or, at worst, in a pair of shiny steel roller skates. I do not remember skateboards passing into my stream of consciousness until I was at an age when such things were no longer supposed to interest me. I guess that by the time I realized there were skateboards I had already passed that mystical point in time when the "experts" (mothers, co-workers, neighbors) say you can no longer perform youthful activities without looking foolish. ...
  • Judicial Fiash Points

    The retirement of Justice William Brennan will have far more impact on the Supreme Court than the simple arithmetic of a 54 decision. And while no one can forecast just how the next court will rule on flashpoint controversies like abortion, many experts believe the court's gradual shift toward conservatism, evident for most of the past decade, will now accelerate across a wide range of issues. A selective list: ...
  • Travels With Grandpa

    A pair of rubber rafts floated onto the swift Snake River last week with unusual passengers on board: eight grandparents and 10 grandchildren, ranging in age from 6 to 69. Blue herons soared overhead in Wyoming's Grand Teton National Park. Snowcapped peaks towered in the distance. "Did you know that interest rates went down one-quarter percent this weekend?" asked Joe Rault, 64, reading The Wall Street Journal. His grandsons Miles Clements, 6, and Eddie Clements, 8, ignored him, too engrossed in the white water that sometimes threatened to upend the raft. Halfway through the 10-mile trip, Grandpa Rault put his paper aside for a pretend nap. Miles and Eddie tried to pry his eyelids open, whereupon Rault wrestled them to the bottom of the raft. As his wife, Bonnie, looked on, Rault said with a gleam in his eye, "They started it!" ...
  • 15 Minute Gap

    No one at the opening of the Richard Nixon library last week mentioned the missing 18 1/2 minutes on the infamous Watergate tape. But some guest were talking about former First Lady Nancy Reagan's 16-minute absence from a luncheon given by the Nixons after the ceremony. During the meal, sources say Mrs. Reagan left the table to chat with a former White House staffer. After about 15 minutes, she returned to her seat next to Richard Nixon. "The rudest thing I've ever witnessed," said one onlooker. "It was a lovely lunch," said a Reagan spokesman. "We don't comment on mischievous gossip."
  • Can Germany Be Contained?

    Helmut Kohl's trip to the Soviet Union almost assured his election as the first chancellor of a united Germany in 45 years. But the rush to unify makes problems for both Germany and the West. His dealing with Mikhail Gorbachev last week irritated and embarrassed allied officials who learned about it after the fact. Western capitals buzzed with speculation that an enlarged German state would attain de facto hegemony over the rest of Europe. Ironically, too, Kohl's successful battle to overcome a Soviet veto on the united Germany's membership in NATO may seriously undermine the Atlantic alliance itself. ...
  • So Why Is No One Cheering?

    Fort Lauderdale stock-market investor Merrill Sands should have had I everything going for him last week. The Dow Jones industrial average hovered all week around 300--the magic number many thought would never be reached so soon after the crash of 1987- and his stock portfolio was full of respectable issues. Yet Sands was far from happy. Despite the bullish numbers, his trusted bank and insurance stocks were on the skids. "The Dow keeps going up," he says, "but the stocks I own don't go up with it." ...
  • Life Of A Rose

    She's outlived her husband by more than 20 years and has mourned the deaths of four children. But Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy is still an indomitable matriarch. Although frail and under round-the-clock care, she made a brief appearance at a public fete honoring her 100th birthday last week. She spent her actual birthday, July 22, with just the family in Hyannis Port, Mass. "I'm like old wine," she told son Teddy. "They don't bring me out very often, but I'm well preserved."
  • Celeb Haircut Review

    Everyone from Ivana Trump to Joan Rivers to Marilyn Quayle is revamping his or her hair this summer. It's simply the thing to do. But just because a celebrity gets a certain cut doesn't mean you should copy it (look at the photos). A sampler of celebrities who have tried new dos, for better or for worse: Who was it who decided the "Presumed Innocent" lead had to wear his hair like Julius Caesar? Don't blame Ford for this. But you can pity him.Had best long hair in Hollywood, so why tamper with perfection? She's a beauty any way you cut it, but she really shouldn't have.The combined flat-top/fade looks too sculpted on top, scorched on the sides. But at least Roseanne Barr can't call him "triangle head" anymore. After years of experimenting, you finally did it, Jane: your locks no longer look like a separate entity. Too bad improved coiffure doesn't guarantee good reviews.
  • Discovering What Little Boys Are Made Of

    Just where do males come from, anyway? Reports last week in the journal Nature offer the most convincing answer yet. Researchers have known since 1959 that the Y chromosome makes an embryo develop testes rather than ovaries. Once that occurs, the sexual die is cast: other male traits, from beards to baldness, stem from hormones made by the testes. Now biologists think they've found the actual gene, on the Y chromosome, that nudges an embryo toward maleness ...
  • Milwaukee Is Talking . . .

    A bout the prison escape of convicted murderer Lawrencia Bembenek, an ex-cop and former Playboy bunny convicted of killing her husband's ex-wife. Rut instead of hoping for her capture, many Milwaukeeans are cheering Bembenek's freedom from the Taycheedah Correctional Institution. Despite two failed appeals, many have doubts about her guilt. But Milwaukee County District Attorney E. Michael McCann suspects a different reason for the fugitive's support: "People don't want to believe an attractive person is guilty."
  • A Bitter Homecoming

    Soviet troops departing from Germany face an unhappy return and a troubled leadership ...
  • He Never Calls, What's A Mother To Do?

    Stop the presses: Maria Panteleyevna Gorbacheva does her own housework: she bakes her own bread. Last week the Soviet newspaper Komsomolskaya Pravda disclosed that Mikhail Gorbachev's 79-year old mother recently had her house in the southern Russian village of Privolnoye repainted. She also bought a color TV to replace her aging black-and-white. And according to correspondent 0. Shapovalov's front-page article, Gorbacheva denied rumors that she was moving to Moscow to be nearer to Mikhail. It was the classic mother's plaint: "I don't see my son here, and I wouldn't see him there," she told a local Communist Party secretary. ...
  • A Boss Deep In His Own Dirt

    Please judge me on my record in the past," George Steinbrenner III said last week, seeking to explain his value to baseball. Could he be joking? The record is precisely why the beleaguered Yankees owner now stands on the brink of banishment from the game. ...
  • A Historic Race Down South

    In the winter of 1963, a TV editorial director named Jesse Helms went on the air to praise the young South Carolina man who had just become Clemson University's first black student. "He has stoutly resisted the pose of a conquering hero for the forces of integration," said Helms. "He simply wants, he says, to be an architect." Harvey Gantt did become an architect but today he wants something more: to be a U.S. senator from North Carolina, and he is running against archconservative Helms the Republican incumbent, for the spot. Defying conventional wisdom that predicted defeat by a white opponent, Gantt swept a June runoff election--becoming the first African-American ever to win a Democratic nomination for the Senate. ...
  • America's Slide Into The Sewer

    I regret the offensiveness of what follows. However, it is high time adult readers sample the words that millions of young Americans are hearing. ...
  • He Left His Briefs Behind

    There's no law that says a guy can't slip out of character now and again. This week actor Alan Rachins, better known as the balding popinjay Douglas Brackman of "L.A. Law," shucks his pinstripes for something more daring. He plays the flamboyant transvestite Albin in a Jupiter, Fla., production of "La Cage Aux Folles." The only thing he's practicing these days is how to walk in size 13C pumps.
  • Congress Passes Judgment On Its Own

    One was greedy, the other used influence to help a lover out of scrapes with the law-and last week colleagues in Congress passed judgment on both men. The Senate Ethics Committee recommended that the full body denounce Sen. Dave Durenberger for pocketing improper book honoraria and fudging his travel expenses. The panel ordered the Minnesota Republican to pay $124,000 in restitution. In the House, the ethics committee voted to reprimand Massachusetts Rep. Barney Frank. Among other transgressions, Frank fixed 33 parking tickets for his former live-in companion, Stephen Gobie. The committee dropped the most damaging charge against the Democrat: that he knew Gobie was running a prostitution ring in the lawmaker's apartment. ...
  • Texas's Lone Stars Team Up

    Purists will be leery of an album as put-together "Texas Tornados," from high concept (Tex-Mex Traveling Wilburys) to cover image (the band, apocalyptically windblown, at a ruined factory) to "Gringo Lingo" glossary ("pesos--Mexican currency"). This supergroup of Texas legends--Freddie Fender, Doug Sahm, Augie Meyers and master accordionist Flaco Jimenez--goes light on Spanish lyrics and heavy on local color, right down to whores with rosaries on the bedpost. They didn't even join forces after jamming all night while drinking Pearl longnecks. A Nashville management company called Sahm after hearing Warner Brothers wanted to bring Tex-Mex to Anglo country radio. ...
  • All Is Not Lost In Cincinnati

    Pete Rose and his entourage left the sentencing room, followed by a pack of reporters carrying cellular telephones. Anyone who took the federal courthouse elevator down during those first frantic moments after Rose, 49, received five months in prison for income-tax evasion got to hear a succession of sportscasters reporting live from the lower, and presumably quieter, floors. "The former Cincinnati Reds star has finally faced the music," a professional radio voice was saying, when the doors opened on six. On four the words "has taken his medicine," dramatically enunciated, drifted into the car. Down in the lobby, someone was actually observing that "life has thrown Charlie Hustle a curve." ...
  • Short Faculties

    Even English majors may be able to get jobs in the '9Os. In a new report by the American Council on Education, 90 percent of U.S. colleges and universities surveyed expressed "concern" about upcoming faculty shortages. Almost two thirds of the schools are already having trouble recruiting for some available positions. Since the Ph.D. glut of the '70s and early '80s, there's been a marked drop in the number of American doctoral candidates. Engineering, math, business and computer science already have faculty shortages; foreign languages and the humanities will soon feel the pinch as professors hired in the 1960s and '60s begin to retire en masse.
  • A Second Chance For Ollie

    Ollie North may soon have another day in court--and be glad for the opportunity. A divided federal appeals court last week suspended all three of North's 1989 convictions in the Irna-contra case and overturned one of them. Most significant, the panel ordered Judge Gerhard Gesell to conduct an exhaustive "witness by witness" inquiry into whether North's trial was impermissibly tainted by the use of earlier testimony he gave Congress under a grant of immunity from prosecution. If the answer is yes, the former National Security Council aide could be entitled to a new trial. "My family and I have been under virtual assault for more than 3 1 / 2 years in this extraordinary legal battle," said North. "I hope the independent counsel will end it now." ...
  • The Remaking Of The President

    Presidential libraries tend to reflect the presidents they memorialize. Lyndon Johnson's in Austin, Texas, is massive and overbearing. John F. Kennedy's in Boston is a soaring white mausoleum by the sea. Harry Truman's in Independence, Mo., is plain and modest; in retirement, Truman liked to surprise schoolchildren by giving tours himself. ...
  • Paying For Time

    The mob has always had a fondness for payback. It's only fitting, then, that U.S. district Judge T. F. Gilroy Daly of New Haven, Conn., over thee last month has ordered six Gambino crime-family mobsters to pay the costs of their incarceration. The six had just been convicted of racketeering activity and given terms ranging from 27 to 96 months. The annual tab for each jailbird: $16,987.
  • A Master Builder

    It was one of those exquisite accidents I that shape history. In May 1956, U.S. I Attorney General Herbert Brownell assembled a conference on court congestion. Arthur Vanderbilt, chief justice of the New Jersey Supreme Court and the nation's chief advocate of unclogging the dockets, was to be the keynote speaker. But when Vanderbilt fell ill two days before the meeting, he prevailed on a favorite younger colleague to stand in. His name was William J. Brennan Jr. Brennan looked over Vanderbilt's notes and then spoke off the cuff. He was a hit. Four months later, when Sherman Minton of the U.S. Supreme Court announced his retirement, Brownell recommended Brennan to President Dwight Eisenhower, in part because his demographics--a Democrat and a Roman Catholic from the Northeast- would help Ike in the upcoming '66 election. It hardly seemed likely that the 50-year-old Brennan would go on to become a beacon of liberalism. The conservative Eisenhower figured it out soon enough. When asked...
  • The Bush Court

    With Brennan's retirement, the president can build a conservative majority. But he faces a bitter fight in the Senate that could cost him politically. ...
  • Death In A Starring Role

    Silent-movie director William Desmond Taylor would be nothing more than footnote fodder had he not died in 1922 with a bullet in his back. For nearly 70 years, people have been trying to figure out who killed this respectable middle-aged bachelor and why. His body was hardly cold before the rumors had him linked with two famous actresses, comedienne Mabel Normand and aging child star Mary Miles Minter. Pornographic photos were said to be found in his bungalow, along with a nightie--panties in some versions--with the initials MMM. None of that was ever substantiated, but it's this ocean of conjectural murk that gives an otherwise tame case its allure. ...
  • An Experience Of Captivity

    Water trickles among the trees, seeking with its unerring instinct for declivity the drains and sumps hidden in the forest floor. Water in its heaviness pools in the lichen-lined hollows, or, crystalline, falls as snow on refrigerated rocks. Then the path spirals between walls of green water, into the cool darkness sidelit by the pale glow of light passing through its translucent, bubble-flecked depths. ...
  • Vote Early And Very, Very Often

    Out of bounds: Cincinnati financier Carl Lindner, for shamelessly hyping self-promoter Donald Trump. USA Today conducted a "Trump hot line" last month where readers could vote on whether Trump symbolizes "what makes the U.S.A. a great country" or typifies the "things that are wrong with this country." The results: 5,215 out of 7,802-or 81 percent--of the callers were pro-Trump. The problem is, 5,640 votes came from a subsidiary of Lindner's American Financial Corp. A Lindner spokesman says employees made the calls because they admired Trump's "entrepreneurial spirit."
  • Pipe Dream

    Even as some states have enacted very strict smoking rules in restaurants some defiant eateries are rallying to the defense of serious addicts. The latest is Yuca, an upscale restaurant in Coral Gables, Fla. Mondays are "Cigar and pipe Smokers' Nights" there. But the real trendsetter may have been Los Angeles's Ma Maison, which has a "Cigar Night" on the first Monday of every month. Then again, nonsmokers there get a break: the restaurant opens a sliding roof over the cigar smokers.
  • Cross Talk

    Democratic polltaker Patrick Caddell is winning high praise in unlikely circles these days: Republican congressmen. Caddell, recently invited by GOP strategist Ed Rollins to speak at the Capitol Hill Club, warned the legislators that the public's anger about the weak economy, the congressional pay raise and the S&L crisis will hurt more incumbents--who are primarily Democrats--this November than is now predicted. Caddell said voters see Washington as "irrelevant" to solving the nation's problems and he called the S&L crisis "America's domestic Vietnam." "He was absolutely brilliant," said Republican National Committee chief of staff Mary Matalin.
  • Rebels Without A Cause

    Liberia's deadly guerrilla war is a battle of simple revenge and tribal bragging rights, not politics ...
  • The Bad, The Beautiful And The Brutal

    The weapons are only bows and arrows; the landscape frozen arctic wastes; the technology defiantly low tech--sleds and axes and crude Laplander tepees. Yet the action scenes in Pathfinder have an impact and excitement that's strangely missing in the machine-gun mayhem of many Hollywood blockbusters. This Norwegian film, spoken in Lapp and directed by the first-timer Nils Gaup, puts the sting back into death. ...
  • 'The Jewish Hong Kong'

    In Tel Aviv, homeless protesters overturned garbage cans and smashed shop windows. Demonstrators in Bat Yam threw firebombs from the roof of the city hall and burned tires. In Jerusalem, residents of one of the tent cities that have sprung up around the country threatened to storm the nearby Knesset. Sitting in a stifling tent there with her 18-month-old daughter last week, Sinaia Arish, 23, shooed away flies and explained how she and her jobless husband, a cook, had been evicted from their $370-amonth apartment. Because of a housing shortage caused by the influx of Soviet Jews, she said, rents have Shot up by as much as 100 percent in the last six months. On unemployment benefits of $570 a month, the Arishes can't afford a new apartment. "We just want equal rights with the Soviet immigrants," she said. ...
  • Another Japanese Challenge For Big Blue

    The Japanese computer giant Fujitsu has made no secret of its desire for global clout--but even most hightech watchers were shocked by last week's bombshell. According to press reports in London and Tokyo, Fujitsu was about to buy controlling interest in the mainframe maker JCL, Britain's technological crown jewel and the most profitable computer firm in Europe. The proposed $400 million deal could profoundry alter the shape of Europe's computer industry--and intensify fears about Japan's growing might. Said one U.S. computer-industry executive: "It [would be] a watershed event in the commercial history of Europe." ...