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  • 'Congress Of The Dead'

    Some gasped. Others shouted "Shame!" Some applauded. As Boris Yeltsin strode down the aisle last week, delegates to the Communist Party Congress knew they were witnesses to a new era; never before had a high official quit the party in public. Soon there was another blow. Leaders of the "Democratic Platform," including the freely elected mayors of Leningrad, Anatoly Sobchak, and Moscow, Gavriil Popov, announced their intention to form a "democratic coalition." With only about 3 percent of the delegates, the Democratic Platform claims support from 40 percent of party membership. If true, that could force the Soviet Union to adopt a multiparty system--and then to make it work. ...
  • Actor's Gotta Do What An Actor's Gotta Do

    In a feminist age, no play of Shakespeare's gets tougher reception than The Taming of the Shrew. You can bet there will be hisses when Petruchio, like 16th-century Andrew Dice Clay, refers to his wife as "my horse, my ox, my ass, my anything." And groans when Katherina the shrew, proclaims the husband to be the lord, head and sovereign. Was Shakespeare kidding? Was Kate the shrew inspired by his wife, the mysterious Anne Hathaway? Or was he characteristically carrying a contemporary attitude to a scathing absurdity? ...
  • 'You Might As Well Give It To Hitler'

    He said the unsayable. Then he tried to unsay it. Nicholas Ridley, Britain's crustaceous cabinet secretary for Trade and Industry, scandalized Europe--and lost his job--last week with an outburst of vintage little-England geopolitics. Economic and monetary union, Ridley told The Spectator magazine, was "a German racket designed to take over the whole of Europe. " The Germans themselves he called "uppity." And the French? They were "behaving like poodles to the Germans" in an inexorable process of economic domination. Then came the punch line: "I'm not against giving up sovereignty in principle, but not to this lot," said Ridley of European Community technocrats. "You might just as well give it to Adolf Hitler, frankly." ...
  • Taking A Hard Line Against Democracy

    Panicked crowds raced through Nairobi's slums, as police gunfire rattled the air. Stone-throwing youths shouted freedom slogans--then quickly returned to their looting. Scattered violence spread beyond the Kenyan capital last week and dissidents who fled the country warned that unless he bends, President Daniel arap Moi could go the way of Romania's Nicolae Ceausescu. But the comparison was overblown. The autocratic government of Moi easily weathered four days of street battles by ordering police to "take all appropriate measures." Few believed the government's claim that 20 civilians had died: eyewitnesses said 19 people were shot dead by the police in one small town alone. Unfazed by a wave of international condemnation, Moi blamed the bloodshed on "hooligans and drug addicts." ...
  • The New Killing Fields

    What do America's national parks have that Asian sex markets want? Seal penises, for one thing. Elk antlers for another. Roth are ground and ingested as aphrodisiacs. "Velvet" elk antler, still soft and filled with blood, can fetch $140 a pound. Bear gallbladder, sold in the Orient to fortify lagging spirits, brings the same price as heroin (up to $800 a gram). Other animal parts are exotic delicacies. "Chattanooga beluga," bluish-gray caviar from freshwater paddlefish, sells to restaurateurs for up to $500 a pound. ...
  • 12 Ring Circus

    It's well known that multiple phones are a status symbol in Moscow. But the perks are not without their pitfalls, even at the pinnacle of Soviet power. While meeting in Moscow with top Kremlin official Georgi Shakhnazarov, Iowa Rep. David Nagle noticed his host had 12 phones on his desk. Nagle also noticed there were no lights on the phones. When one rings, he thought, how does the guy know which one to pick up? He doesn't. Each time a phone rang during the meeting, Shakhnazarov picked up one receiver after another until he found the right one.
  • The S&L Firestorm

    Neil Bush faced a hard choice last January. Federal regulators had offered the president's son a deal. They would reduce the charges stemming from his involvement in Silverado, a failed savings and loan in Colorado. All Bush had to do was sign an agreement pledging never again to violate S&L rules. But in his mind the decree amounted to an admission of guilt that would likely haunt him if he followed his plan to enter politics someday. After days of deliberation, Bush announced to friends and family that he was going to fight. "To sign a piece of paper, even one as meaningless as this may be, would imply I did something wrong," he said. "I sleep soundly at night knowing I live an honest life." ...
  • The Soviets' Summer Of Discontent

    What a difference a year makes. Soviet coal miners went on strike last summer with traditional grievances: low pay, unsafe working conditions. This time around, their walkout was an angry, political act. At the height of the Communist Party Congress in Moscow last week, tens of thousands of miners from Siberia to the Ukraine downed tools for 24 hours, demanding the resignation of the Soviet governmert. To the horror of many delegates to the Party Congress, they also called for dismantling party cells at the mines. "Last year we still thought our government could do something for us," said Mikhail Asesorov, 40, who has spent nearly half his life in the shafts of the Pravda mines in the Ukrainian city of Donetsk. "Now we've lost faith in everything." ...
  • End Of The Third World

    The Third World is gone. It has been vanishing for a long while, but now it has completely disappeared. Oh, the countries once assigned to the Third World are still there, but the concept of the Third World is no longer connected to any reality. ...
  • At Nasa, The Bad News Just Keeps Coming

    NASA isn't known for getting things right the first time, whether shuttles or orbiting telescopes. And officials have never pretended that their proposed manned space station would be perfect: they always knew that space-walking astronauts would have to make regular repairs. What the agency did not figure on was how many. According to a report by engineers at NASA and its contractors, scheduled for release as early as this week, the station might need 3,800 hours of maintenance every year. That compares to just over 200 hours ever logged by space-walking Americans. ...
  • Gentlemen, Start Your Rays

    Think of it as driving from Florida to Michigan, over hilly country roads, maintaining a steady 23 mph--and doing it with all the power of a hair dryer under the hood. That was the challenge facing students from 32 colleges in the United States and Canada last week. After days of grueling qualifying rounds, they accelerated out of Walt Disney's EPCOT Center at the start of the 1,641-mile "GM Sunrayce USA," the largest American rally ever held for cars powered by the energy of our nearest star. ...
  • Secrets From The Storeroom

    It might pass for your family garage sale. Over here a few goat-and-bee jugs, an aunt's misconceived notion of a wedding gift. Over there some old chairs which might bring a few dollars if they weren't so damned uncomfortable. And the fluorescent sculpture: what were you under the influence of when you popped for that? ...
  • Long Terms Of Endearment

    The brutal Nazi boot is stomping on Europe, and young Edwige, a French Jew, is cruelly torn from her lover Gabriel and thrown into a concentration camp. He is devastated, and assumes she has perished--but 60 years later, lo and behold, they find each other again in the south of France. In this French-flavored film, "A Star for Two," Edwige (Lauren Bacall) has survived the war to become a gerontologist; Gabriel (Anthony Quinn) is a renowned New York cancer researcher. True love bubbles back up between the septuagenarian sweethearts when they meet at a medical-awards dinner. The romantic tale, which recently finished shooting on location in Nice and should be released next year, flows like sparkling Vin de pays to a happy ending, reminding us all along the way that if the vintage is right, passion and tenderness know no age limits.
  • Still Shocking After A Year

    The color photographs displayed in a Manhattan courtroom last week were unsparingly graphic. Jurors were clearly stunned as prosecutors displayed images of the Central Park jogger's battered face, her bloody torso, her bruised legs. It was the third week of testimony in the trial of three youths accused of raping and beating the 30-year-old investment banker. Despite more than a year of sometimes lurid news coverage, the case still has the power to shock. That's why defense lawyers objected strenuously to the pictures. "I think the photos have a definite effect on [the jurors]," says Michael Joseph, who is representing 16-year-old Antron McCray. "The question is whether they can put aside the effect and weigh the evidence." ...
  • New Help For Alice In Groceryland

    laden with saturated fat, "lite" cheesecake just as caloric as its regular counterpart, soup with 800 milligrams of sodium per serving but as many as three "servings" per can--no wonder shoppers nowadays feel like Alice in Groceryland, where words mean exactly what food companies want them to mean. Last week, however, the Food and Drug: Administration proposed tough guidelines designed to clear up the confusion. For the first time, nutrition labeling would be mandatory on most packaged foods, fresh produce and seafood. (Meats are regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.) Terms such as "low cholesterol" would be strictly defined (less than 20 milligrams per serving), and they could not be used on products with more than five grams of fat per serving--in other words, if the bad news outweighed the good. Serving sizes would be standardized, so that a soft drink typically serving one could not be labeled otherwise to reduce the nutritional insult. Later this year, the FDA will...
  • Greenspan's Lips Finally Move

    President Bush to stock pickers have been urging Alan Greenspan to loosen the nation's money supply. But the chairman of the Federal Reserve Board stood firm, insisting that the nation had more to fear from inflation than from a possible recession. Last week Greenspan abruptly changed his mind and announced that the Fed would cut interest rates to keep the economy moving. The news gave a shot to Wall Street. Investors pushed the Dow Jones average above 3000 for the first time, before it settled Friday at 2980. ...
  • A Texas Chardonnay?

    Crosswoods Vineyards sits on top of a hill, postcard pretty with its pristine red-and-white-roofed winery overlooking lush green land that falls five miles to the sea. The winery is surrounded by 32 acres of grapes, half dedicated to the production of a fine Chardonnay. All in all, it appears to be a perfect patch of California wine country. But when the sun burns off the morning haze, the body of water visible is not the Pacific Ocean, but Long Island Sound. And the sign on the highway just a few miles away reads: WELCOME TO CONNECTICUT. ...
  • A Choice Of Chuckles

    As unpretentious summer entertainments, the comedies Quick Change and The Freshman and the comic horror film Arachnophobia all deliver what they promise. Each will make you laugh (and one squirm as well). What kind of laughter do you prefer: the consistent chuckles of "Quick Change," the wilder but more erratic guffaws of "The Freshman," or the anxiety-induced shrieks of Arachnophobia"? ...
  • Takes A Lickin'

    They're already stuck in the minds of millions of readers. But now Zonker, Mike, Duke and the gang have found a new place to hang out--on stamps. Cartoonist Garry Trudeau and his associate George Corsillo have come up with "The 1990 Doonesbury Stamp Album" as a way to raise money for the Literacy Volunteers of New York City, Inc. The stamps also mark 20 years of "Doonesbury" antics. But don't try to send mail with them. Like the strip, they're not for real.
  • How The 'West' Was Lost

    Every year around this time the Economic summit picture reappears: a bunch of guys in well-cut business suits, one woman in the middle wearing a prim but pricey outfit--nothing casual here. They fare posed in a long line, side by side and uniformly spaced, and they mostly wear suitably indecipherable quarter smiles, neither warm nor amused nor even ironic, just little turnups at the corner of the mouth. They always seem to me to have too many clothes on. I don't mean that in a lascivious sense, only that, like the coat-and-vest-andnecktied Nixon in those old incongruous shots from poolside at Key Biscayne, they look oddly inappropriate to the leafy summer setting in which they are pictured. ...
  • The New Mario Scenario

    It's that time again when Democrats start dreaming of the Mario scenario. The latest fantasy has the New York governor announcing for the presidency early next year, soon enough to clear the field of any other candidates (including Jesse Jackson). Then, in a triumphal march through the primaries, candidate Cuomo would subject George Bush to his verbal pyrotechnics. Voters would be dazzled by the contrast between Cuomo's soulful poetry and Bush's fractured syntax. "He's already made S&Ls sweet music for the Democrats," says Cuomo aide Brad Johnson. The fall election would be like old times, with the Democrats riding a populist wave of discontent against the GOP. Cuomo's running mate would be Nebraska Sen. Bob Kerrey, a Vietnam veteran with a Congressional Medal of Honor. Democrats are gleeful at the thought of Kerrey debating Dan Quayle, who served in the National Guard rather than go to Vietnam. ...
  • Who Really Won In Louisiana?

    Right-to-Lifers hoping the restrictive abortion bill just approved by the Louisiana Legislature will lead to the overturning of Roe v. Wade are likely to be disappointed, legal experts say. If, as expected, Gov. Buddy Roemer lets the measure become law, prochoicers plan a quick appeal that would probably reach the Supreme Court. By a 5-4 vote, the justices recently rejected a Minnesota law requiring both parents be notified before a minor has an abortion. Court watchers say it's unlikely Justice Sandra Day O'Connor, the pivot vote in that case, would accept the more restrictive Louisiana law.
  • An Abrupt Exodus From Albania

    Pressed against the guardrails, the ragged, sunken-eyed refugees cheered their escape from privation and repression. "Ciao Italia," they shouted from the upper decks as the ships steamed into the Adriatic harbor town of Brindisi. Reluctantly granted safe passage last week by Eastern Europe's last Stalinist state, they had swarmed aboard planes for Budapest, Warsaw and Prague. Trains carried them toward destinations in France and West Germany. Boats headed for Marseilles and the coast of Italy. The Brindisi-bound exodus alone ferried about 4,000 refugees. It was the final leg of their flight. After languishing for 12 long days behind foreign embassy walls in the capital of Tirana, thousands of dissident Albanians were free at last. ...
  • Fax Me To The Moon

    Back in the late 1970s the Air Force wanted a fax machine that could withstand subzero temperatures, monsoons and nuclear blasts. It took 11 years to develop; now the AF is getting 173 Litton fax machines that, by the estimation of Michigan Sen. Carl Levin, have cost $668,208 per unit. While the AF says the super faxes cost only $411,000 each, experts note that common $1,000 faxes now have nearly all the abilities of the special model.
  • Changing Dimes

    It's enough to drive a coin collector crazy. The Senate has passed a bill six times to update the current designs of the backs of U.S. coins. The changes would likely raise millions from coin collectors. But the legislation keeps getting hung up in the House. Last year, sources say, the bill stalled because Diane Wolf, a former member of the Commission of Fine Arts who has pushed hard for the changes, rubbed key congressmen the wrong way. The delays have created a new problem: a leading design idea was to commemorate the bicentennial of the U.S. Constitution. That was more than two years ago.
  • Picking Up The Pieces

    As an owlish young prophet in the '60s, Kevin Phillips scanned Middle America for Richard Nixon. Since then he has seen the GOP dump Nixon's Main Street Republicanism for Ronald Reagan's mink-coat kind, and Neil Bush tarnish George Bush's Episcopal Garden Club variety. Last month he published his dismay in "The Politics of Rich and Poor." Since then Jesse Jackson has asked him for two signed copies of the book. Tom Turnipseed, one of George Wallace's old populist operatives, has written him a fan letter. And the head of the Senate's Democratic campaign committee has invited him to a retreat with Democratic senators intent on learning how to pull up their socks. This has infuriated the GOP's neo-laissez-faire, Laffer-curve fat cats. "That's not what I am," he says. "And that's not what the Republican Party was 20 years ago." ...
  • A Frightening Aftermath

    Knocked down with brute force, a knife at her throat, a rape victim has every reason to believe she is about to die. Usually she survives, only to begin the torturous recovery from physical and psychological wounds. Now, however, a fatal new fear has exacerbated the aftermath of rape. "AIDS has made rape an even more frightening and traumatic experience," says Carolyn Holmes, a psychologist at the University of Texas Medical School in Houston. "There has always been a concern about venereal disease, but now your life is involved." ...
  • Dog Days Of Fashion

    The ancients thought dogs the animals closest to humans because they can feel shame. Wrong--at least for the Weimaraners in artist William Wegman's fashion spread in the August issue of Details. While their master's exhibition of photos, paintings and videotapes graces London's Institute of Contemporary Art this summer, they've been stuck stateside with coat-hanger duty. Posed while . . . er, wearing a variety of designer knitwear, the poor beasts look more dazed than discomfited. But maybe the last bark's theirs and they're really saying, "I wouldn't be caught dog in this sweater. "
  • A Crisis In The First Family

    The report, compiled during the White House transition, must surely rank as one of the more fascinating and poignant documents of the Bush presidency. Forty-four pages long, it is entitled, "All the Presidents' Children," and it is a compendium of the private and not-so-private problems of presidential offspring through the years. Among other findings, the paper concludes that the sons and daughters of American presidents have suffered from higher-than-average rates of alcoholism, divorce and accidental death--disturbing evidence of the stress that living in the shadow of history can cause. Neil Bush may recall one prescient passage. "The presidential child in business faces the pressure of enormous scrutiny," the report's author, White House staffer Douglas Wead, wrote. "Two things the media and the public won't allow? Success or failure. Keep the business mediocre, maintain a personal low profile, and you will be left alone." ...
  • For Adults Only

    Out of bounds: The Andover (Mass.) public library, for banishing eager-to-read children to a kiddie room and keeping them away from most books. Library director Nancy Jacobson thinks the kids make too much noise. If youngsters below the seventh grade want to browse for books beyond the "Horton Hears a Who" variety. she says, they must have an adult chaperone them--hardly the best way to encourage higher learning. But the kids are fighting back: one is circulating a petition among third to fifth graders demanding that children be allowed to browse with the big people and the Massachusetts Civil Liberties Union is considering a lawsuit.
  • Shoot-Out In Houston

    George Bush called last week's gathering in Houston the first economic summit of the post-cold-war period, "a celebration of victory over barbed wire concrete walls and discredited despotism." But the sense of common military purpose that had been achieved at a NATO summit one week earlier escaped the seven major industrial democracies at their annual economic gathering Houston was more a shoot-out than a peace parley. Each major power felt free to pursue its own interests no matter what the others thought. The frightening implication is that when--and if--the Soviet Union finally does disband its still mighty military, the last glue in the Western Alliance will dissolve and the West will fall into nakedly competing regional blocs--America, Europe and Asia. ...
  • Old Enemies, New Questions

    Medger Evers was only 37 when he died in 1963, but the hard-charging NAACP field secretary spent most of those years organizing voter-registration drives and economic boycotts, making numerous enemies among Mississippi's white segregationists. Someone settled scores with him on the driveway of his Jackson home shortly after midnight on June 12. As he stepped from his car, a rifle shot tore into his back and through his chest. An hour later, he was dead. For a time it looked like justice would be swift. Authorities found a rifle and sniper's scope in a honeysuckle thicket 150 feet from Evers's house. A near-perfect fingerprint quickly led investigators to Byron de la Beckwith, a fertilizer salesman and White Citizens Council organizer from nearby Greenwood. Yet two trials before all-white Hinds County juries ended in deadlocks. ...
  • The New Fuzzy Dice

    You mightn't have guessed, but Andrew Dice Clay, that leather-jacketed fount of squirt fantasies that defy not just good taste but human anatomy, wants to be understood. He has feelings and, as he says, when you're on top, people like to knock you. One day before critics began bleeping all over his new movie, "The Adventures of Ford Fairlane," the self-described "hottest comic in the world" issued a misty on-air apologia to Arsenio Hall. He's just a kid from Brooklyn who believed in himself, worked hard for 10 years to get where he is today, and anyone who doesn't like it can . . . keep his opinions to himself, or words to that effect. A couple of days later, he was back at it with Diane Sawyer on ABC's "Primetime Live," elucidating the difference between Andrew Dice Clay, the character, and Andrew Clay Silverstein, the real person. "If I was Dice to you right now . . . I'd be sitting here, like, 'So let me ask you something, honey. You live alone? You wearing panties?'That's what...
  • A Mean Strain Of Strep

    Brad Andrews thought nothing of it when he scraped his arm playing racquetball in 1986. "There was a little blood--I just put a Band-Aid on it," says the Boise, Idaho, attorney, now 34. A few days later Andrews felt flu-ish and his arm started to swell. By the time he drove to the emergency room, his fever was high. X-rays of his elbow revealed an infection. His fever kept climbing, his blood pressure plunged and he showed signs of toxic shock syndrome. An infectious-. disease specialist isolated a bacteria known as Group A streptococcus in Andrews's bloodstream. After a week, he left the hospital on high doses of penicillin--30 pounds lighter but lucky to be alive. ...
  • Cape Cod Mutiny

    It wasn't quite "Mutiny on the Bounty," but it was as close as we get these days. Last week Gary Feener, captain of the 73-foot scallop boat Barnacle Bill, radioed for help claiming his crew attacked him about 100 miles off Nantucket The sailors complained of bad food, bad pay, bad treatment; the captain claims he was threatened with a scallop knife. He and two loyalists managed to lock themselves in the pilot house while the swashhuckling scallopers cut the navigational and electrical wires and trashed the deck. But this highseas adventure didn't end with a keelhauling. Captain Feener was rescued by the Coast Guard and the crew was ferried to nearby Hyannis.
  • Jesse's 'Deep Throat'

    The State Department is wondering whether Sen. Jesse Helms has developed a "Deep Throat" within the U.S. intelligence community who is leaking the senator information on the Strategic Arms Reduction Talks (START). NEWSWEEK has learned that Helms, in a detailed, 25-page questionnaire and "Dear Jim" cover letter to Secretary of State James Baker, has revealed the most intimate knowledge of Baker's negotiating tactics and of U.S. intelligence about Soviet strategic modernization plans. One State Department source called the information "appallingly well informed." In the material sent to State, Helms says he knows of "an important Soviet defector" who "recently" provided U.S. officials with new technical information about the Soviet Backfire bomber that will spark renewed controversy at the START negotiations. ...
  • Of Beauty And Mooseburgers

    Summer is rerun hell. You know it, and the networks know you'll sit for it. Of course, that was before dwindling audience shares and proliferating viewing choices turned the network programming game into a blood sport. Nowadays, any TV outlet that closes shop for the summer risks discovering that its clientele forgot to come back in the fall. The upshot: a summer wave of what the industry calls "original product." " Some of these series are more original than others and a few will make you long for preruns--but then no one ever looked to the tube for a perfect wave. ...
  • The Voices Of America

    If such an upbeat fellow as Alan Lomax has nightmares, they must be like this scene from Thomas Pynchon's 1966 novel, "The Crying of Lot 49." An acid head named Mucho Maas listens to Muzak and imagines--prophetically, we now know--that "they could dispense with live musicians if they wanted. Put together all the right overtones at the right power levels so it'd come out like a violin." He goes on to fantasize that since each human voice is just a combination of frequencies, they could all be electronically broken down and reassembled. "Then you'd have this big, God, maybe a couple hundred million chorus saying 'rich, chocolaty goodness' together, and it would all be the same voice." ...
  • Zina's Breakthrough

    Tennis has moved out of the country club in recent | years, but it remains a sport heavily tilted in favor of players who grew up with money. Zina Garrison, a hard-luck 26-year-old who learned to play on a Houston playground, struck a democratic blow last week with a shocker upset of top-ranked Steffi Graf in the Wimbledon semifinals, 6-3, 3-6, 6-4. After a hard-fought first game, she succumbed to the unsinkable Martina Navratilova in the finals, 64, 6-1, giving the 33 year-old veteran a record ninth Wimbledon singles title. But even while falling short, Garrison left the tennis world with a memorable taste of grit, advancing further than any black woman since Althea Gibson in 1958. ...
  • Now, The Task Is 'Economic Containment'

    During the cold war, containment meant keeping Soviet expansionism in check. Today, containment is taking on a new geopolitical meaning: preventing the economic might of Germany and Japan from so dominating world exports that it tears apart the global trading system. The gravity of the issue--"the issue of the 1990s," as Robert Lawrence of The Brookings Institution calls it--means that once uneventful economic summits, such as this week's meeting in Houston, will replace NATO summits as the most important international get-togethers of the year. Economics is no longer the sideshow; it's center stage. "The danger is that we replace the cold war with a trade war," says Robert Hormats of Goldman Sachs International, who himself helped organize half a dozen summits. "In a demilitarized era, economic forces are king." ...
  • Don't Worry, America

    Three years ago, Yale professor Paul Kennedy became America's favorite prophet of doom. His book "The Rise and Fall of the Great Powers" popped up on coffee tables throughout the land; he found himself before congressional committees and television talk shows, expounding the book's thesis of "imperial overstretch." The United States, he suggested, was falling victim to the same process that had undone other great powers: as their influence grew, so did their military commitments; these obligations strained their economies; nations with lighter military burdens sprinted ahead of them. This notion was gobbled up by a nation then obsessed with the Japanese economic "threat. " ...
  • She Stoops To Conquer

    Imelda Marcos was acquitted last week of stealing $200 million from the Philippine treasury and investing it in the United States. Jurors were confused about why she was tried here for allegedly stealing there. The "world-class shopper" was so relieved she walked down the aisle of St. Patrick's Cathedral on her knees, a Philippine custom. The gesture was spiritual and practical: she thanked God, and saved her shoe leather.
  • Searching For The Beef

    He was an unlikely choice for chairman of the world's second largest advertising group. When Robert Louis-Dreyfus took the helm of Saatchi & Saatchi Company PLC six months ago, most New York ad executives didn't even recognize his name, let alone pronounce it properly. Frenchmen knew him better as an heir to one of Europe's great grain-trading fortunes than as a global advertising mogul. Today, charged with the task of breathing new life into the troubled company, LouisDreyfus still maintains a low profile. He is banking on a disciplined, no-nonsense form of leadership to revive the once mighty ad giant. "I am not a tap dancer," he says. "What Saatchi needs most now is peace. " ...
  • Protest

    Newsweek has learned that Secretary of State James Baker this week will formally protest a Soviet plan to place an SS-4 intermediate-range missile in Cuba. The Soviets say it won't be operational and it's going into a museum. But U.S. officials see the plan as a worrisome reminder of the 1962 Cuban missile crisis. "This just reopens old wounds," says an administration source. Under the INF treaty, the Soviets must destroy, their intermediate-range missiles. Washington agreed to permit Moscow to keep an inoperative SS-20 in a museum at a missile-training base in the Soviet Union. But the new plan for housing an SS-4, even one that's been disabled, in Cuba is too close to home.
  • Read The Lobbyists' Lips: Tax The Other Guy

    It was former senator Rusell Long who contained the un-official theme song Capitol Hill lobbyist: "Don't tax you, don't tax me--tax the fellow behind that tree." Last week the lobbyist were moving their lips as fast as they could to endorse that sentiment. No sooner had President Bush backed away from his read my-lips pledge than details of new tax proposals began leaking out. And--surprise, surprise--lobbyist for everything from brewers to stockbrokers began scrambling to protect their flanks. ...
  • 'I Give To People Who Are Suffering'

    the value of timing. In 1984, with the presidential election less than two months away, the outspoken advocate for the homeless went on a hunger strike in Washington, D.C. He wanted to force the U.S. government to donate an abandoned federal building to the homeless. Two days before the election, Ronald Reagan gave in--and agreed to allocate $5 million to create a shelter that now houses some 1,200 residents. Emaciated from his 51-day fast, Snyder emerged a national figure, and his gamble made homelessness a national issue. But in recent months Snyder, 46, worried that public sympathy was slipping away. Then fellow activist Carol Fennelly, 40, called off their wedding plans. Last week, leaving a note saying that he couldn't handle "breaking up," Snyder hanged himself in his shelter bedroom. ...
  • Immaterial Affections

    Hollywood's definition of a perfect couple is a man and a woman, one of I whom is dead. How else to explain the preponderance of ghostly love stories haunting the screen? Now, just six months after Richard Dreyfuss returned from heaven to voyeuristically snoop on his mate in "Always," here's the ghostly Patrick Swayze mooning over his grieving girlfriend, Demi Moore, in Ghost. Swayze, a corporate banker, has just been killed by a New York mugger, but his spirit is still hanging around his Tribeca loft when he I discovers Moore's life is in danger. How can he save her when he's immaterial? Enter Whoopi Goldberg as Sister Oda Mae Brown, a quack spiritual adviser. Imagine her surprise, after years of faking communication with the dead, when this white boy starts talking to her from beyond the grave, and won't leave her in peace until she gets involved in saving Demi--and helping Patrick track down the man who murdered him. ...
  • The Start Of A Cd Backlash?

    Remember the CD Revolution? When sophisticated music lovers discovered the crisp sound of the digital discs, the predictions went, they would snap them up despite their hefty price. Then, as demand boomed, CD prices would tumble and the record-buying masses would join in. Pretty soon the LP would go the way of the Victrola--but with a better-sounding and longer-lasting alternative, who would miss it? ...
  • Women Under Assault

    The three teenage defendants just stared impassively, but over in the jury box, one of the 12 panelists grimaced and another shook his head. As the "Central Park jogger" trial continued in a Manhattan courtroom last week, key witnesses described the condition of the young woman discovered beaten, raped and left for dead on an isolated footpath. His voice breaking, police officer Joseph Walsh identified a blood-caked garment as the shirt he found tied around the victim's neck, twirling it into a long knotted rope from the witness stand. "She kept kicking out," said Walsh--as though she were still fighting off assailants. Later, a surgeon told the jurors that the jogger had lost three quarters of her blood on that night in April 1989. "She received a blow so severe that . . . her eyeball had exploded back through the rear of its socket," said Dr. Robert Kurtz. "The normal hills and valleys that appear on everyone's brain were flattened out, obliterated." ...
  • Waiting For The Fall

    The rebels of Liberia's National Patriotic Front were determined to capture or kill President Samuel K. Doe last week, even if they had to put a city of 500,000 people under siege. The rebels cut off Monrovia's water and electricity and severed communications to the outside world. Hungry citizens foraged for leaves and roots. One man with bullet wounds bled for four hours as government soldiers ignored his pleas and turned to looting and stealing cars instead. On one morning alone, some 17 corpses were discovered around the capital. As rebel artillery boomed, Doe hid in the executive mansion where his predecessor was killed 10 years ago. ...
  • Day Care: Bridging The Generation Gap

    The Stride Rite Corp. Has long been a pioneer in family-oriented employee benefits. In 1971 the Cambridge, Mass., shoe manufacturer opened one of the nations's first corporate day-care centers. The facility now has a capacity enrollment of 55 kids, 15 months to 6 years, and this yaer welcomed some new participants: seven elderly people. Stride Rite's Intergenerational Day Care Center is believed to be the first mixed-age on-site center in the country. ...
  • A New Role For Nato

    As the cold war fades, Western leaders seek to reassure the Soviets and preserve the alliance ...
  • Ick-Shtick: The Diceman Cometh

    This will be the only review of Andrew Dice Clay's The Adventures of Ford Fairlane that mentions T. S. Eliot. What's the connection between the foul-mouthed comic and the great poet? Both have been accused of misogyny; there are lines in Eliot's original version of "The Waste Land" about women's minds and bodies that sound like highbrow versions of the Diceman's riffs. So what? So, at the highest and lowest cultural levels, the fear and awe of women have driven men into extremes of eloquence and indecency. In "Ford Fairlane" Clay's profane machismo is played for what it is, a parody of the insecure male whose strutting supremacism is just an act. ...
  • Lights Out

    People often make the best out of a catastrophe. Take last year's San Francisco earthquake. The Seton Medical Center in Daly City, Calif., is reporting a 25 percent increase in births compared to the same time last year. A hospital spokeswoman says the quake "occurred exactly nine months ago and power was out for several hours. We can only surmise that the two must be connected."