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  • Baker's About-Face On Cambodia

    Now no place seems safe. With Khmer Rouge troops advancing toward Phnom Penh in units of several hundred men each, the capital is becoming vulnerable. For the first time in the 11-year guerrilla war against the Vietnamese-backed government of Cambodia, refugees are flowing into the capital. Early this month a Western relief worker driving 60 miles outside the city turned back after watching rebels ambush a government truck. A week ago Khmer Rouge troops attacked a passenger train 40 miles north of Phnom Penh, then killed at least 30 passengers they linked to the government. ...
  • Meanwhile, Back In Cajun Country

    Louisiana's Cajun music is driven by the sound of the diatonic accordion: like a harmonica (and unlike the standard piano accordion) it has only enough notes to play in two major keys. The Tex-Mex button accordion has a mellower, fleeter sound than the reedy Cajun instrument, with its organlike stops. But, as a new anthology from the Country Music Foundation shows, what Cajuns lose in fluidity they gain in funk. ...
  • Justice Stands Trial

    Someone has murdered--and probably raped--the sexy, ambitious prosecutor Carolyn Polhemus (Greta Scacchi). The chief prosecuting attorney (Brian Dennehy) needs a culprit fast, or it may cost him the upcoming election. So he turns the case over to his protege, Rusty Sabich (Harrison Ford), a dedicated, clamped-down prosecutor and family man. There's a problem, however, a big one. Sabich had had a tempestuous affair with the victim, and the evidence it's his job to gather suggests he's the one who should be prosecuted. Soon the tables of justice are turned, and the attorney is standing trial for a crime of passion he has to prove he didn't commit. ...
  • The Priest And The Rabbi

    Christians and Jews have talked about one another for centuries. Recently, however, they have begun to talk with one another. A year ago Rabbi Leon Klenicki of the Anti-Defamation League . and Lutheran theologian Richard John I Neuhaus published a cordial conversation on social and political issues that divide the two faiths. And last month Elie Wiesel and New York's Cardinal John O'Connor published a breezy dialogue on the Holocaust, anti-Semitism,.world peace and other subjects. Now, in a longer and more substantive exchange, Father Andrew Greeley and Rabbi Jacob Neusner interpret Scripture to each other in a spirited effort to isolate where Jews and Catholics agree--and differ--about the word of God. ...
  • From Rambo To Riches

    It was the kind of action script that Hollywood loves, featuring a love triangle between a coke-snorting, trigger-happy cop and two bisexual women. Yet not even screenwriter Joe Eszterhas, whose hits include "Flashdance" and "Jagged Edge," could have envisioned the bidding war that erupted after his agent put "Basic Instinct" up for auction last month. The winner? Independent Carolco Pictures Inc., which snatched up the property for an astonishing $3 million--nearly $1.26 million more than the next highest price paid for a "spec" script this year. ...
  • A Romantic Revolution

    He's a high-stakes roller in search of the ultimate card game. She's married to an aristocratic revolutionary. It's not your typical boy-meets girl, but "Havana," starring Robert Redford and Lena Olin ("Enemies, A Love Story"), promises to be something of a "romantic thriller," says producer Sydney Pollack. "It's about two outsiders whose lives are changed by the Cuban revolution." Shot in Santo Domingo, and due out December, the film follows the lovers for eight days--from Christmas Eve to New Year's Day--through the dying gasp of the opulent, sensual playground of pre-Castro Cuba.
  • Gold Rush

    If a good start is everything, then the '92 U.S. Olympic bobsledding team is headed downhill fast. During recent qualifying trials held at Lake Placid N.Y., veteran driver Brian Shimer got a big boost from L.A. Raider Willie Gault, Minnesota Viking Herschel Walker and medal-winning hurdler Edwin Moses. Push come to shove, they aim to be the most awesome starting lineup ever.
  • Battling Over The Almighty Beaver

    Sometimes a species other than man plays God with the ecological balance. To build a dam on the Truckee River in downtown Reno, Nev., a phalanx of 120 beavers ravaged a two-mile stretch of cottonwood trees, extending to the outskirts of town. By damaging 90 percent of the trees, the beavers endangered the homes of 135 species of birds and 40 species of mammals, as well as countless fish that rely on the shade to survive in the summer heat. Conservationists demanded action. But when wildlife biologists suggested extermination, other activists put pressure on state officials. "I made it very clear that it was my desire that they exhaust every conceivable option before extermination," says Gov. Bob Miller. "Only the Almighty has the ultimate determination." ...
  • Body Count Ii

    Action movies are inevitably bloodbaths. But more importantly, the sequels, aside from being less entertaining, often have twice the number of corpses as their predecessors. Why show another car wreck when you can blow up a jumbo jet? Here's a look at this year's crop: Movie Original Sequel DIE HARD 15 162 ROBOCOP 27 58 48 HRS. 9 20
  • Remembrance Of Ads Past

    Don't be alarmed if you're watching TV one of these days and you suddenly hear a familiar question: "Where's the beef?" Or if an announcer's booming voice declares, "Takes a licking, keeps on ticking." You're not suffering from deja vu. You're witnessing the latest trend in advertising: retro ads. More and more advertisers are turning to successful campaigns from the past to give a lift to sales today. Maypo cereal has revived the slogan "I want my Maypo." And bubbly voices are once again singing "Riunite on ice, Riunite that's nice." Companies are so high on the past that they'll sometimes go to almost any length to re-create it. Coca-Cola hired a detective agency to track down the folks who 20 years ago gathered on a hillside to sing "I'd Like to Buy the World a Coke." ...
  • Quayle Gets A Confidence Vote

    Maybe the pundits were wrong. In a survey of 48 state GOP chairmen, Washingtonian magazine reports this week that 35--or 73 percent--said the vice president should remain as George Bush's running mate in 1992 (two chairmen didn't respond). This is a vindication of sorts for the vice president and might signal a dampening of the dump-Quayle talk that has circulated since 1988. Quayle was roundly praised by the leaders for fund raising, drawing crowds and supporting local Republicans. Two votes apiece went to James Baker, Elizabeth Dole and Dick Cheney; Jack Kemp and Bob Dole each got one nod. But Quayle's runner-up, with 5 votes, was "no preference."
  • Will There Be A 51St Star?

    Puerto Ricans debate whether they can join the United States and maintain their cultural identity ...
  • Time In A Bottle

    Veteran sailor Tom McClean, 47, won't be hitting the bottle for the next 28 days. He'll be riding in it. The Scotsman left New York for England in a motorized 37-foot jug last Tuesday to raise money for children's charities. Provisions for the voyage include 30 cans of beans and 50 pounds of chocolate. He'll need the extra kick; the floating flagon only goes 6 mph.
  • Ways To Win

    With a record number of women candidates this year, the National Women's Political Caucus has put together a practical "Guide to Winning in the '9Os." Among the tips: Get press in ways men can't. Women candidates are more "visually arresting" at traditionally male job locations such as construction sites;Don't smoke in public;Cut back on alcohol. You don't need the calories, the drain on your energy or the reputation as a lush;Don't cry in public. If you start to feel overly emotional, take a deep breath; Schedule as many debates with a male opponent as possible. It's hard for male candidates to find a politically appropriate response to strong women.
  • Government From Below?

    After his landslide defeat in Nicaragua's presidential elections last February, Sandinista leader Daniel Ortega rallied his diehards with a vow to "govern from below." Last week Nicaraguans got a taste of what he meant: a violent general strike led by a Sandinista labor federation paralyzed Managua. For two days the capital teetered on the edge of civil war. Armed Sandinista workers built barricades from the same paving stones they used in the 1979 insurrection against dictator Anastasio Somoza. They traded gunfire, bricks and Molotov cocktails with progovernment forces. When the fighting subsided, four people lay dead and dozens were injured. ...
  • The Right To Die In Dignity

    Americans are confused by the Supreme Court's decision that Nancy Cruzan, a 32-year-old Missouri woman who has been in a coma since a car accident seven years ago, must remain tethered to a feeding tube indefinitely. You might assume that the decision was based on a slim chance that she would one day recover, but it wasn't. Everyone agrees that she will never wake up. Instead, the court denied Nancy's parents the right to remove the feeding tube because Nancy failed to leave clear instructions that this is what she would want. Careless of her. Without such instructions the court saw no reason to override the Missouri court's presumption that people would prefer being vegetables to being dead. although it's hard to find anyone who would. ...
  • Man Makes The Clothes

    Like Michelangelo's David, the statues" muscular forms show off the glory of the male body. But these aren't sculptures of ancient gods or idealized Biblical heroes. They're fully jointed window mannequins designed by artist Lowell Nesbitt for Pucci Manikins of New York--made to reflect the new pumped-up, gym-chiseled man of the '9Os. The mannequins, which are at least one size larger--and much more macho--than the traditional department-store variety, will be introduced at Dayton Hudson's Midwestern stores in the fall. Now, that's the way to sell a swimsuit.
  • A Longing For Liberty

    It was a week of ferment below the Sahara. In the Kenyan capital of Nairobi, a protest against one-party rule ended in looting and at least 20 deaths. From Somalia came reports of government troops opening fire in a soccer stadium after fans stoned the president; 66 people were confirmed dead. Liberian ruler Samuel K. Doe was under rebel siege in his seafront mansion. Meanwhile, in Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, African heads of state ended the annual Organization of African Unity summit by pledging full democratization. The leaders were forced to acknowledge a new reality in sub-Saharan Africa. Inspired by the revolutions in Eastern Europe and angry at chronic corruption and economic mismanagement, their people are calling for an end to the authoritarian regimes that have ruled them, in many cases, since independence. ...
  • When Life Imitates Bart

    Who said Bart Simpson was white, anyway? In fact, he's kind of mustard-colored. So perhaps it's not surprising that, no sooner had official Simpson products become all the rage when a black version of the cartoon character began popping up on T-shirts from coast to coast. Sometimes this new Bart is funny, as when he appears in Rastafarian dreadlocks, saying, "The Simpsons go funky reggae." Sometimes, as a Michael Jordanesque "Air Bart," he's supercool. Frequently, he's got black power on his mind ("Knowledge is the Key") or Nelson Mandela by his side. ...
  • Pedaling To The Next Century

    On the theory that any activity involving gel-filled shorts can't be dismissed lightly, let us now look into the world of long-distance bicycling. A boom is going on there, big time. ...
  • The Mind Of The Rapist

    A startling rise in sex crimes and the notoriety of cases like the Central Park jogger give new urgency to the question: why do men rape? ...
  • A Future For The Futurists

    Inside the Chicago futures markets, the trading pits can be a Hadean whirl of flailing hands and screaming orders. And for the last three years, events outside the exchange have been just about as dizzying. Ever since the stock-market crash of 1987 everywhere the Chicago Board of Trade and the Chicago Mercantile Exchange turned, it seemed someone was coming after them. The stock markets blamed Chicago for their volatility. The Justice Department accused their traders of winking at widespread fraud. As Chicago looked to defend itself at home, overseas markets jumped into the futures business. ...
  • More Clear Air?

    Smokers beware. New Jersey Sen. Frank Lautenberg, the Transportation subcommittee chairman who engineered the smoking ban on airliners, has a new target: airport terminals. Lautenberg aides say he has no formal plan yet, but sources close to the senator say his goal is to get rid of the dense wall of smoke passengers now often face when they step off smoke-free planes. It's not clear how such a ban would affect terminal restaurants or bars, but they might become the only oases left for that last puff before boarding.
  • The Saudis Say Hello To China

    Saudi Arabia, which hasn't recognized a communist bloc country since the 1930s, will establish full diplomatic relations with China this week, NEWSWEEK has learned. The arrangement was worked out earlier this month in Beijing by the Saudis' ambassador to Washington, Prince Bandar bin Sultan. Two years ago, Prince Bandar negotiated a deal for the sale of Chinese DF-3 intermediate-range missiles to the Saudis. The Saudis' decision to recognize China is an "adjustment to the post-cold-war world," said a source close to the Saudi throne. The Saudis see China as a lucrative market for petrochemicals. They also want to protect the interests of China's sizable Muslim populations.
  • Summer Reading Peripicks

    Face it: Flaubert and Moliere do not go well with coconut oil and sno-cones. It's time again for easy beach reading. Some books--Dominick Dunne's "An Inconvenient Woman" or Slim Keith's memoirs--are a notch above trashy, of course. Here's Peri's ratings of some that are not: (****)Dark Angel Sally Beauman's page-turner features incest, patricide, suicide, voyeurism. The only likable character is Bertie, the Newfoundland dog.(**)Twins In Roxanne Pulitzer's world everyone is tall, tan, narrow-tripped, longlegged, muscular, sexy. Designer labels outnumber cliches--barely.(*)A House in the Hamptons Another sizzling cover, lots of hot, hot romance and insufferable greedheads. But. Why. Does. Author. Gloria. Nagy. Write. Like. This?(***)Malibu Pat Booth's latest gets big points for steamy cover and wins the Celebrity Name-dropping Award hands down. That's all it will ever win.
  • Stark Raving Madchester

    All over England--and now, the rest of Europe as well--in open fields and cavernous clubs, in two-bedroom terrace houses and airplane hangars, dance mania has broken loose. Kids who weren't even born during the psychedelic '60s are slipping into paisley skirts and bell-bottom jeans and heading for updated love-ins known as "raves." Scrubbed and mellow and often stoned out of their gourds, their Monkeys haircuts bobbing and their bright, baggy clothes flopping, they dance until dawn to the untiring pulse of drum machines. "We're all happy people now. We all love each other and dancing," says Danny Kelly, deputy editor of the London-based rock-and-roll weekly New Musical Express. "This is the most important music since punk." ...
  • Fall Of The Marionettes

    In the 1980s, dozens of entrepreneurs built empires with Michael Milken pulling the strings. Now that the junk czar is gone, many have foundered. ...
  • A Scotland Yard For Crimes Against Animals

    It was a big case, one of the biggest the sleuths at the National Fishand Wildlife Forensics Laboratory had ever seen--109 live elk shipped from a New Mexico ranch to an antler farm in Canada last I fall. The task: to prove, as wildlife officials suspected, that the elk had been illegally baited from state lands onto the ranch. The solution: a harmless powder that, when consumed, makes the elk's urine glow under ultraviolet light. Game officers applied the powder to hay left out on public lands and then, weeks; later, seized the shipment of animals for examination. The result: 20 indictments in what the feds now call the Pee Glow Elk case. ...
  • A Scandal In The Cloister

    For years, Allan Boesak helped breathe life into South Africa's antiapartheid movement with his fiery speeches. But last week, when he announced his resignation as a minister in the Dutch Reformed Mission Church, it was with tears of personal anguish. "This is one of the darkest days of my life," he told grieving worshipers at his church in Bellville South, a mixed-race suburb of Cape Town. Boesak, 44, said he intended to give up the position he had held for the past 15 years after an Afrikaans-language newspaper, Die Burger, reported that he was having an affair with a married woman, Johannesburg television producer Elna Botha. Boesak admitted that his 21-year marriage had been failing "for some time now," but insisted that "nothing immoral" had taken place between him and Botha. Boesak's wife, Dorothy, was more blunt. "I think it is just a sickness among men over 40," she told the Cape Times. ...
  • Blond Bomber

    The Material Girl appears to have fallen out of Vogue, at least in Italy. Lukewarm ticket sales, a canceled performance in Rome and protests plagued Madonna last week, after Catholic groups labeled her act blasphemous. Temporarily subdued, Madonna invited fair-minded Catholics to see her show and then judge for themselves. But not enough of the fair-minded showed up. Scalpers reportedly sold tickets at and below cost.
  • Buzzwords

    When Periscope asked the snooty Maidstone Club in East Hampton, Long Island, for beach buzzwords, they said, "Our lifeguards don't use slang. You'd better try the public beaches." A sampling of lifeguard-speak from around the country: Overly earnest lifeguard who isn't any fun.Compulsive body-builders.Swimmer who gets banged up in the undertow.Men's bikini-style bathing suit.Swimmer without the bod for the beach. Also, "stone."Like it sounds. Also, a "potential," as in, "We've got a potential out by the rocks."Choppy waters. No swimming. Bikini-clad bathing beauty.
  • Jesse: A Capitol Office?

    Can Senate Majority Leader George Mitchell say no to Jesse Jackson? Jackson, who is running for the post of "shadow senator" from the District of Columbia, is already asking for an office on Capitol Hill and access to the Senate floor if he wins. Jackson is one of several candidates for the two unpaid, nonvoting Senate seats created by the city council early this year to lobby for D.C. statehood. "I would be shocked beyond shock if Mitchell rolls over on this," says a key Democratic aide. Jackson has made D.C. statehood his cause and he's favored to be elected in November. If he's granted floor privileges, Democrats fear he won't limit his lobbying to statehood. They think Mitchell would, in effect, create a bully pulpit for Jackson. Mitchell aides say he hasn't made a decision, but Democratic Party officials don't expect him to cave in to Jackson.
  • 'Congress Of The Dead'

    Some gasped. Others shouted "Shame!" Some applauded. As Boris Yeltsin strode down the aisle last week, delegates to the Communist Party Congress knew they were witnesses to a new era; never before had a high official quit the party in public. Soon there was another blow. Leaders of the "Democratic Platform," including the freely elected mayors of Leningrad, Anatoly Sobchak, and Moscow, Gavriil Popov, announced their intention to form a "democratic coalition." With only about 3 percent of the delegates, the Democratic Platform claims support from 40 percent of party membership. If true, that could force the Soviet Union to adopt a multiparty system--and then to make it work. ...
  • Actor's Gotta Do What An Actor's Gotta Do

    In a feminist age, no play of Shakespeare's gets tougher reception than The Taming of the Shrew. You can bet there will be hisses when Petruchio, like 16th-century Andrew Dice Clay, refers to his wife as "my horse, my ox, my ass, my anything." And groans when Katherina the shrew, proclaims the husband to be the lord, head and sovereign. Was Shakespeare kidding? Was Kate the shrew inspired by his wife, the mysterious Anne Hathaway? Or was he characteristically carrying a contemporary attitude to a scathing absurdity? ...
  • 'You Might As Well Give It To Hitler'

    He said the unsayable. Then he tried to unsay it. Nicholas Ridley, Britain's crustaceous cabinet secretary for Trade and Industry, scandalized Europe--and lost his job--last week with an outburst of vintage little-England geopolitics. Economic and monetary union, Ridley told The Spectator magazine, was "a German racket designed to take over the whole of Europe. " The Germans themselves he called "uppity." And the French? They were "behaving like poodles to the Germans" in an inexorable process of economic domination. Then came the punch line: "I'm not against giving up sovereignty in principle, but not to this lot," said Ridley of European Community technocrats. "You might just as well give it to Adolf Hitler, frankly." ...
  • Taking A Hard Line Against Democracy

    Panicked crowds raced through Nairobi's slums, as police gunfire rattled the air. Stone-throwing youths shouted freedom slogans--then quickly returned to their looting. Scattered violence spread beyond the Kenyan capital last week and dissidents who fled the country warned that unless he bends, President Daniel arap Moi could go the way of Romania's Nicolae Ceausescu. But the comparison was overblown. The autocratic government of Moi easily weathered four days of street battles by ordering police to "take all appropriate measures." Few believed the government's claim that 20 civilians had died: eyewitnesses said 19 people were shot dead by the police in one small town alone. Unfazed by a wave of international condemnation, Moi blamed the bloodshed on "hooligans and drug addicts." ...
  • The New Killing Fields

    What do America's national parks have that Asian sex markets want? Seal penises, for one thing. Elk antlers for another. Roth are ground and ingested as aphrodisiacs. "Velvet" elk antler, still soft and filled with blood, can fetch $140 a pound. Bear gallbladder, sold in the Orient to fortify lagging spirits, brings the same price as heroin (up to $800 a gram). Other animal parts are exotic delicacies. "Chattanooga beluga," bluish-gray caviar from freshwater paddlefish, sells to restaurateurs for up to $500 a pound. ...
  • 12 Ring Circus

    It's well known that multiple phones are a status symbol in Moscow. But the perks are not without their pitfalls, even at the pinnacle of Soviet power. While meeting in Moscow with top Kremlin official Georgi Shakhnazarov, Iowa Rep. David Nagle noticed his host had 12 phones on his desk. Nagle also noticed there were no lights on the phones. When one rings, he thought, how does the guy know which one to pick up? He doesn't. Each time a phone rang during the meeting, Shakhnazarov picked up one receiver after another until he found the right one.
  • The S&L Firestorm

    Neil Bush faced a hard choice last January. Federal regulators had offered the president's son a deal. They would reduce the charges stemming from his involvement in Silverado, a failed savings and loan in Colorado. All Bush had to do was sign an agreement pledging never again to violate S&L rules. But in his mind the decree amounted to an admission of guilt that would likely haunt him if he followed his plan to enter politics someday. After days of deliberation, Bush announced to friends and family that he was going to fight. "To sign a piece of paper, even one as meaningless as this may be, would imply I did something wrong," he said. "I sleep soundly at night knowing I live an honest life." ...
  • The Soviets' Summer Of Discontent

    What a difference a year makes. Soviet coal miners went on strike last summer with traditional grievances: low pay, unsafe working conditions. This time around, their walkout was an angry, political act. At the height of the Communist Party Congress in Moscow last week, tens of thousands of miners from Siberia to the Ukraine downed tools for 24 hours, demanding the resignation of the Soviet governmert. To the horror of many delegates to the Party Congress, they also called for dismantling party cells at the mines. "Last year we still thought our government could do something for us," said Mikhail Asesorov, 40, who has spent nearly half his life in the shafts of the Pravda mines in the Ukrainian city of Donetsk. "Now we've lost faith in everything." ...
  • End Of The Third World

    The Third World is gone. It has been vanishing for a long while, but now it has completely disappeared. Oh, the countries once assigned to the Third World are still there, but the concept of the Third World is no longer connected to any reality. ...
  • At Nasa, The Bad News Just Keeps Coming

    NASA isn't known for getting things right the first time, whether shuttles or orbiting telescopes. And officials have never pretended that their proposed manned space station would be perfect: they always knew that space-walking astronauts would have to make regular repairs. What the agency did not figure on was how many. According to a report by engineers at NASA and its contractors, scheduled for release as early as this week, the station might need 3,800 hours of maintenance every year. That compares to just over 200 hours ever logged by space-walking Americans. ...
  • Gentlemen, Start Your Rays

    Think of it as driving from Florida to Michigan, over hilly country roads, maintaining a steady 23 mph--and doing it with all the power of a hair dryer under the hood. That was the challenge facing students from 32 colleges in the United States and Canada last week. After days of grueling qualifying rounds, they accelerated out of Walt Disney's EPCOT Center at the start of the 1,641-mile "GM Sunrayce USA," the largest American rally ever held for cars powered by the energy of our nearest star. ...
  • Secrets From The Storeroom

    It might pass for your family garage sale. Over here a few goat-and-bee jugs, an aunt's misconceived notion of a wedding gift. Over there some old chairs which might bring a few dollars if they weren't so damned uncomfortable. And the fluorescent sculpture: what were you under the influence of when you popped for that? ...
  • Long Terms Of Endearment

    The brutal Nazi boot is stomping on Europe, and young Edwige, a French Jew, is cruelly torn from her lover Gabriel and thrown into a concentration camp. He is devastated, and assumes she has perished--but 60 years later, lo and behold, they find each other again in the south of France. In this French-flavored film, "A Star for Two," Edwige (Lauren Bacall) has survived the war to become a gerontologist; Gabriel (Anthony Quinn) is a renowned New York cancer researcher. True love bubbles back up between the septuagenarian sweethearts when they meet at a medical-awards dinner. The romantic tale, which recently finished shooting on location in Nice and should be released next year, flows like sparkling Vin de pays to a happy ending, reminding us all along the way that if the vintage is right, passion and tenderness know no age limits.
  • Still Shocking After A Year

    The color photographs displayed in a Manhattan courtroom last week were unsparingly graphic. Jurors were clearly stunned as prosecutors displayed images of the Central Park jogger's battered face, her bloody torso, her bruised legs. It was the third week of testimony in the trial of three youths accused of raping and beating the 30-year-old investment banker. Despite more than a year of sometimes lurid news coverage, the case still has the power to shock. That's why defense lawyers objected strenuously to the pictures. "I think the photos have a definite effect on [the jurors]," says Michael Joseph, who is representing 16-year-old Antron McCray. "The question is whether they can put aside the effect and weigh the evidence." ...
  • New Help For Alice In Groceryland

    laden with saturated fat, "lite" cheesecake just as caloric as its regular counterpart, soup with 800 milligrams of sodium per serving but as many as three "servings" per can--no wonder shoppers nowadays feel like Alice in Groceryland, where words mean exactly what food companies want them to mean. Last week, however, the Food and Drug: Administration proposed tough guidelines designed to clear up the confusion. For the first time, nutrition labeling would be mandatory on most packaged foods, fresh produce and seafood. (Meats are regulated by the U.S. Department of Agriculture.) Terms such as "low cholesterol" would be strictly defined (less than 20 milligrams per serving), and they could not be used on products with more than five grams of fat per serving--in other words, if the bad news outweighed the good. Serving sizes would be standardized, so that a soft drink typically serving one could not be labeled otherwise to reduce the nutritional insult. Later this year, the FDA will...
  • Greenspan's Lips Finally Move

    President Bush to stock pickers have been urging Alan Greenspan to loosen the nation's money supply. But the chairman of the Federal Reserve Board stood firm, insisting that the nation had more to fear from inflation than from a possible recession. Last week Greenspan abruptly changed his mind and announced that the Fed would cut interest rates to keep the economy moving. The news gave a shot to Wall Street. Investors pushed the Dow Jones average above 3000 for the first time, before it settled Friday at 2980. ...
  • A Texas Chardonnay?

    Crosswoods Vineyards sits on top of a hill, postcard pretty with its pristine red-and-white-roofed winery overlooking lush green land that falls five miles to the sea. The winery is surrounded by 32 acres of grapes, half dedicated to the production of a fine Chardonnay. All in all, it appears to be a perfect patch of California wine country. But when the sun burns off the morning haze, the body of water visible is not the Pacific Ocean, but Long Island Sound. And the sign on the highway just a few miles away reads: WELCOME TO CONNECTICUT. ...
  • A Choice Of Chuckles

    As unpretentious summer entertainments, the comedies Quick Change and The Freshman and the comic horror film Arachnophobia all deliver what they promise. Each will make you laugh (and one squirm as well). What kind of laughter do you prefer: the consistent chuckles of "Quick Change," the wilder but more erratic guffaws of "The Freshman," or the anxiety-induced shrieks of Arachnophobia"? ...
  • Takes A Lickin'

    They're already stuck in the minds of millions of readers. But now Zonker, Mike, Duke and the gang have found a new place to hang out--on stamps. Cartoonist Garry Trudeau and his associate George Corsillo have come up with "The 1990 Doonesbury Stamp Album" as a way to raise money for the Literacy Volunteers of New York City, Inc. The stamps also mark 20 years of "Doonesbury" antics. But don't try to send mail with them. Like the strip, they're not for real.
  • How The 'West' Was Lost

    Every year around this time the Economic summit picture reappears: a bunch of guys in well-cut business suits, one woman in the middle wearing a prim but pricey outfit--nothing casual here. They fare posed in a long line, side by side and uniformly spaced, and they mostly wear suitably indecipherable quarter smiles, neither warm nor amused nor even ironic, just little turnups at the corner of the mouth. They always seem to me to have too many clothes on. I don't mean that in a lascivious sense, only that, like the coat-and-vest-andnecktied Nixon in those old incongruous shots from poolside at Key Biscayne, they look oddly inappropriate to the leafy summer setting in which they are pictured. ...
  • The New Mario Scenario

    It's that time again when Democrats start dreaming of the Mario scenario. The latest fantasy has the New York governor announcing for the presidency early next year, soon enough to clear the field of any other candidates (including Jesse Jackson). Then, in a triumphal march through the primaries, candidate Cuomo would subject George Bush to his verbal pyrotechnics. Voters would be dazzled by the contrast between Cuomo's soulful poetry and Bush's fractured syntax. "He's already made S&Ls sweet music for the Democrats," says Cuomo aide Brad Johnson. The fall election would be like old times, with the Democrats riding a populist wave of discontent against the GOP. Cuomo's running mate would be Nebraska Sen. Bob Kerrey, a Vietnam veteran with a Congressional Medal of Honor. Democrats are gleeful at the thought of Kerrey debating Dan Quayle, who served in the National Guard rather than go to Vietnam. ...