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  • Acting Frisky At Comiskey

    The Chicago Cubs used to be the team of the trendy. Celebrities, an ex-president included, did play by play. Bryant Gumbel and George Will were avid fans. Even the ballpark was perfect: with its ivy-draped brick, it had a certain collegiate panache. But no longer. The hot ticket in Chicago this season isn't the fifth-place Cubs, it's the White--hot Sox. That's right, the White Sox--the humble team from the South Side, the team that once took the field in shorts, for God's sake--last week grabbed the lead in the American League West. ...
  • Hello, Hello! Are You There?

    More chilling news for air travelers. The National Air Traffic Controllers Association claims safety has been jeopardized in the airspace managed by a regional control center west of Chicago. During the past year, the group says, there have been more than 500 communications glitches between controllers and pilots, including several instances of total radio failure. The Federal Aviation Administration agrees there have been problems but insists communications are safe.
  • Waiter! Get Me A Picture Phone And A Fax!

    It looks like the setting for a power lunch. But inside Electronic Cafe International in Santa Monica, Calif., you can get a lot more than a cup of espresso and a piece of quiche. How about a fax from India, or a teleconference call from London? Located in Santa Monica's 18th Street Arts Complex, Cafe International is more than an eatery; it's the latest wrinkle in global communications facilities. ...
  • Good Appetite

    Republican Chairman Lee Atwater's style may have mellowed since he was found to have a brain tumor in March, but he hasn't lost his political appetite. He went for a drive last week with GOP honchos Ed Rollins and Lyn Nofziger and discussed the gubernatorial races in California, Texas, Illinois, Ohio and Florida. Doctors say the tumor hasn't grown, but he's not out of danger. Atwater walks with a cane and spends up to seven hours a day in physical therapy.
  • The 'Quark Barrel' Politics Of The Ssc

    It won't cure cancer or improve the nation's defenses, but science's latest megaproject enjoys the kind of support in Congress usually reserved for tax cuts. It's not that lawmakers are so impressed that the proposed atom smasher (which would be the most powerful on earth) promises to solve such profound mysteries as where the elementary blocks i of matter called quarks come from. No, to understand why the House of Representatives last week voted $318 million for the machine that will perform these wonders, and why Congress may write checks for much of the rest of the $8 billion it will cost, forget the profound mysteries. Consider a map drawn up by the Department of Energy (DOE). Thirty-nine states have a university, firm or lab with a piece of the Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) pie. It's known as quark-barrel politics. ...
  • Death Bias?

    Is sexism playing a life-or-death role for terminally ill patients? Yes, according to a study to be released this week by the journal of the American Society of Law and Medicine. The study concludes that American courts usually reject turning off life-support systems for female patients because women are considered more emotional, immature and in need of protection than men. In six out of eight cases involving men, the study says, appellate courts followed the euthanasia preferences of the patient. But only two out of 14 court rulings involving women followed the same guideline. "Dying," complains study coauthor Dr. Steve Miles, "is not a gendered activity."
  • The Successful Annoyer

    A Tory M.P. says of Thatcher, 'She cannot see an institution without hitting it with her handbag' ...
  • A White-Male Lament

    You know us. We're everywhere and we drive you crazy. We turn up where you work, at parties and next to you in airplanes. We're the ones who debate the merits of leaf blowers, comparison shop for car polishes and file every warranty for every purchase. We're the ones who can't clap to the beat, who wear awkward smiles, the kind of guys you hope won't try to start a conversation. We're BMCWM--boring, middle-class white men. How did so many of us wind up so boring Well, we didn't ask to be this way. Being boring is a role thrust upon us. ...
  • The Nixons Go For The Gold

    Richard and Pat Nixon met in 1938, when both landed parts in an amateur production of George S. Kaufman's "The Dark Tower." Watergate reporters Woodward and Bernstein later wrote that the Nixons had a loveless marriage. Maybe so, but last week they celebrated their 50th anniversary. It was a quiet family affair, the only social splash was made by the Nixon grandkids in the swimming pool.
  • It's Time For Summer Reruns

    This is the time for golf, C-Span and mowing the lawn. Indeed, summer programming can be such a reach that NBC is rerunning the quite good but failed 1983 Cybill Shepherd vehicle "The Yellow Rose." Here, then, is a guide to selecting which reruns to watch from the year's best shows (and remember, there's always baseball on bad nights):
  • No Common Ground

    Abortion: The Clash of Absolutes. By Laurence H. Tribe. 270pages. Norton. $19.95. ...
  • A Quick Look At The History Of Smut

    When not busy at the Constitutional Convention, Founding Father Ben Franklin pens essays on choosing a mistress (find older women) and combating flatulence (drink perfume, avoid onions). Pretty raunchy stuff. But the new nation values tolerance: it adopts the First Amendment in 1791.A new "family" edition of Shakespeare is published by Thomas Bowdler. It expurgates the racy stuff. A new verb enters the lexicon: "to bowdlerize," to remove what cannot with propriety be read aloud in a family. Big seller in the United States.Anthony Comstock, a New York grocer and religious fanatic, spurs laws banning obscene literature from the mails. He "exposes" such offending writers as Voltaire. "Comstockery" (as George Bernard Shaw called it) is born. In 1882, Walt Whitman's "Leaves of Grass" is banned in Boston. Years later, Comstock wins appointment to President Woodrow Wilson's International Purity Congress.Two classics are declared obscene by Massachusetts courts: Theodore Dreiser's "An...
  • Heavy Coverage In Colombia

    Colombian officials warn that they may stop backing the U.S. war on drugs if Washington Mayor Marion Barry gets off lightly on cocaine-related charges. "The United States has decided to wage war until not one Colombian is standing, but is unwilling to make any real sacrifices," says a top government adviser. Barry's Washington trial is often front-page news in Colombia. It is seen there as a test of U.S. commitment to curb demand by getting tough on users at home. If high-profile U.S. drug consumers go unpunished, officials say, it will be difficult to convince Colombians their war on the cartels is worth continued bloodshed.
  • In Her Own Image: Marilyn Quayle's New Appeal

    It seemed like a bad joke. Marilyn Quayle selected federal disaster relief as her first cause while all around her disasters were constantly occurring. Her beleaguered husband remained a target of ridicule despite his efforts to prove himself as vice president. Her children were struggling to adjust to life in the Washington fishbowl. Even her desire to return to her law career--or fill the seat Dan Quayle had vacated in the Senate--prompted public criticism and private frustration. At somber lunches with friends, tears welled up as she recounted the travails of her new life. ...
  • Fixing The 'Between'

    When it first appeared three decades ago, the field of family therapy was considered revolutionary for its view of the family as as "system" in which members collide with one another in predictable ways. Today family theraphy is undergoing a small revolution of its own. Spurred by feminists in its midst, the profession is being forced to re-examined its persistent sexual stereotyping of family members--a tendency all the more curious in a brand of theraphy that all places heavy emphasis on gender roles. One of the more familiar, and problematic, family constellations, for instance, is the so-called persuader-distancer couple, consisting of an "over-involved" mother and an "unavailable' father who between them, stir up a witch's brew offamily tensions. Such concepts have come under attack by feminist who believe that a mother's expressive way are somehow being turned into a liability by therapist. ...
  • Keeping The Pressure On President Bush

    Keep the pressure on," chanted the adoring throngs after Nelson Mandela stepped off a jetliner in New York last week and invoked the main theme of his six-week, 14-nation tour. The demand raised questions all but forgotten since the emotional sanctions debate of 1986: how much pressure, and for how long The South African government was hoping for a reward for its relaxation of political repression, including Mandela's release. Pretoria may soon meet the legal test that would enable President Bush to begin lifting U.S. economic sanctions, the most stringent imposed by any of South Africa's major trading partners. But Mandela insists sanctions should stay "until fundamental and irreversible changes take place"--and that will take years, at best. "[South African President F. W.] de Klerk has done nothing," Mandela said. "What are you rewarding him for?" ...
  • Good News In The Drug War

    Narcotics agents in Orange County, Calif, have been getting unexpected results lately when they field-test the purity of seized cocaine: instead of the deep royal-blue indicating high-grade powder, the cops are more often seeing a pale shade, showing that the drug has been heavily "stepped on," or diluted. In New York City, undercover narcs who six months ago paid $24,000 for a kilo of coke in buy-and-bust operations are now having to pay as much as $35,000. Since January, the wholesale price of cocaine has skyrocketed in New York, Houston, Chicago and Los Angeles--where, over the same period, the typical size of a $20 rock of crack has shrunk by one fourth. Prices up, purity down: it's a classic sign that supplies are low. ...
  • Congress: The Flag Boosters Get Burned

    George Bush and the GOP's congressional leadership had hoped to fete the Fourth of July with the first step toward a new-and-improved Bill of Rights. But last week the House of Representatives rained on their parade, defeating a proposed constitutional amendment to ban desecration of the American flag. For several days, congressmen debated the issue with a mix of passion and parody. While Illinois Rep. Henry J. Hyde invoked people who "paid for [the flag] with their blood," Rep. Gary L. Ackerman of New York displayed items with a flag motif, including panty hose and garbage bags. "How about American flag napkins?" said Ackerman. "What if you blow your nose in one? Have you broken the law?" ...
  • The Importance Of Being Nasty

    Luther Campbell's month so far: his group's record "As Nasty as They Wanna Be" became the first ever ruled obscene in federal court and he was arrested after a show. Hundreds of stores have pulled the album. The silver lining thousands of stores haven't it's sold almost 2 million copies. As Campbell said when Broward County, Fla., cops led him away, "That's life in America." ...
  • Historic Boat:

    For only $1,225,000, collectors of political memorabilia can purchase Monkey Business, the yacht that was the redoubt of Gary Hart and Donna Rice. Florida yacht broker Bob Offer explained there wasn't much charter business for the boat after the Hart affair. Many wives, he said, would not allow their husbands on the yacht. The boat was advertised in the classified section of The Wall Street Journal as a craft "whose charms are irresistible. "
  • 'Taking Out The Cancer'

    Lookouts whistle in warning when the unmarked police car enters an apartment block in the fetid Panama City slum of Curundu. Two Panamanian cops emerge, sweating and anxious. The apartments above them bristle with grenades and machine guns. On an earlier patrol, someone threw a body from an upper-story window--perhaps as a warning. "This is the most dangerous area we have," says Sgt. Javier Batista, scanning the rooftops while holding a pump-action 12-gauge. "If someone starts firing from up here, a shotgun won't reach them." As the Panama Defense Forces under Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega, they always entered the area well armed. Now demoted to civilian police by their American occupiers, they carry only shotguns and sidearms. The U.S. servicemen who accompany them appear unsympathetic. American military adviser Joseph Guilmette says he draws his gun "on a daily basis" in the barrios. "We get shot at. It's no big deal. It's part of the job." ...
  • A Trove

    United States investigators are poring through a trove of sensitive bank records, captured during the invasion Panama, that could help crack the financial networks of the drug cartels and other criminal organization. Under Manuel Panama Panama was a world-laundering center. Analyst have already traced $1 billion from U.S. drug sales to 683 cartel accounts in 37 Panamanian banks. They now hope to match names in the Panamanian accounts with numbered electronic money transfers that have been monitored by the National Security Agency since the mid-1980s. The Treasury Department has set up a new interagency intelligence unit called FINCEN to direct the investigation.
  • If It Only Had A Heart

    If you thought Old Detroit was going to the dogs in "RoboCop," wait till you see what horrors lurk in RoboCop 2. Crime is rampant in the streets, the city has gone bankrupt, the police are on strike and half the population seems to be strung out on a deadly new drug called Nuke. All of this looks like good news to Omni Consumer Products (OCP), the heartless corporation that runs the police department and, as it turns out, wants to foreclose on the city itself. "We're taking Detroit private!" OCP announces with greedy glee, smelling profit in urban chaos. ...
  • The Right Wing's Cultural Warrior

    When Sen. Jesse Helms invites you to see his etchings, he's not kidding. As Capitol Hill's point man against obscenity, he keeps a small stash of Robert Mapplethorpe's homoerotic photographs in his office. He often makes viewing them a condition for news interviews. When a television station refused his request that they air the pictures, Helms had made his point. If showing Mapplethorpe's work on television could cost a broadcaster his license, he argued, why should the NEA get a free ride? Helms insists he is not a prude or a censor. He just doesn't want the NEA spending tax money to offend God-fearing Americans. "If America persists in the way it's going, and the Lord doesn't strike us down," he says, "he ought to apologize to Sodom and Gomorrah." ...
  • Can This Marriage Be Saved?

    Quebec was preparing for the feast of the shepherd Jean Baptiste, the province's patron saint. For the first time since 1969, when separatist violence marred the celebration, a parade was scheduled; children would ride through the streets of Montreal in a float shaped like a lamb three stories high. Last week the lamb stood outside the fold. Prime Minister Brian Mulroney pronounced dead his six-year campaign to resolve a long-running constitutional crisis by reconciling French Quebec with English Canada. "Just because the sheep is an animal that has a reputation for following, we don't want to be ashamed of it," said Robert Gariepy, a volunteer organizer in Montreal. "We want to be proud of and show the positive direction we're taking with our country." ...
  • Big Gains

    Seventeen percent of the 7,461 state legislators in the United States are women, up from 12 percent in 1981. But among the states, the difference in women's representation is vast: States with highest percentage of state legislators who are women: New Hampshire 32.1% Maine 30.7 % Vermont 30.6 % Arizona 30.0 % Colorado 28.6 % States with lowest percentage of state legislators who are women: Louisiana 2.1 % Kentucky 5.1 % Alabama 5.7 % Mississippi 5.8 % Pennsylvania 6.7 % SOURCE: FUND FOR THE FEMINIST MAJORITY
  • Enduring A 'Test Of God'

    A massive earthquake thunders through northern Iran, killing thousands of people and challenging Rafsanjani's hard-pressed regimeIt was after midnight, and like most Iranians, the inhabitants of Gilan and Zanjan provinces were in bed or watching World Cup soccer on television. Then their homes collapsed on top of them. In barely a minute, a huge earthquake flattened more than 100 villages, towns and cities, cutting many of them off from outside help and leaving them vulnerable to the aftershocks that rolled through the hills like thunder. The quake devastated a rich agricultural area in the north of Iran along the Caspian Sea. Iran's new spiritual leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, called it a "test of God." But the disaster soon became a more mundane test of the Iranian government's ability--after more than a decade of revolution, war and zealous isolation--to work with the outside world to meet the demands of a heartbreaking human crisis.By the end of last week, the dead were...
  • From 'Donald Ducks' To 'Trump: The Joke'

    It was getting to be like the Perils of Pauline. Would Donald Trump get a reprieve with a last-minute loan package? Would he show up headlines like DONALD DUCKS by making debt payments befora Tuesday's deadline? And lurking over those questions was an even bigger one: was the renowned dealmaker in danger of becoming: Trump: TheJoke? ...
  • Found: Man's Newest Furry Cousin

    Biologists can be an existential bunch: to them, no species exists until a scientist describes it. For centuries the coastal fishermen of the Brazilian barrier island Superaqui took for granted the caras pretas, or black-faced monkeys, playing on their roofs and gamboling in the seaside brush. Last year zoologist Dante Martins Teixeira of the National Museum in Rio de Janeiro met a Superaqui native who told him about the squirrel-size monkeys who had golden manes like lions and black tails, forearms and faces. Two of Martins's colleagues from Brazil's Capao da Imbuia Natural History Museum spent a month on the island observing the monkeys in the wild. The creatures were too cunning and fast for the camera, but the biologists did bring back a preserved skin given to them by a fisherman. After close scrutiny, the Brazilians announced last week that they had "discovered" a new primate species, Leontopithecus caissara, or black-faced lion tamarin. If they're right, the creature is a...
  • Hailing A Hero--And Looking For Our Own

    Everywhere Nelson Mandela went in New York last week, black folks brought their kids. Parents led them through the downtown crowds to watch the ticker-tape parade; they carried them on their shoulders during the tour of Harlem; they kept them up until almost midnight at the rally in Yankee Stadium. Thousands saw it as a once-in-a-lifetime chance to expose children to someone they could hold up as a true black hero. The images were moving--but they pointed up a conspicuous irony. Many African-Americans now seem to feel far more passionately about Mandela than they do about any black leaders here in this country. ...
  • Eco-Activist Summer

    With few noisy clashes and a crowd of about 500, it was something less than the dramatic curtain raiser many had expected. But last week's antilogging demonstration at Louisiana-Pacific's Samoa mill, just west of Eureka, Calif. at least laid down the lines for "Redwood Summer"--a season of civil disobedience just beginning in the timber country of northern California. On one side of the road leading into the mill, supporters of the radical environmental group Earth First. "There's no time left to try to work through legal measures," demonstrator Chris Robinson said. "You also have to get out and do some grass-roots activism." On the other side, working people whose livelihoods depend on the logging business. Secretary Kim Lennon-Bailey clocked out of the Louisiana-Pacific mill around lunchtime, picked up a picket sign reading MY KIDS ARE MY FUTURE and joined the pro-logging, antiprotester contingent. "I believe in my job and I believe in this area," she said. ...
  • Hackers Of The World, Unite!

    As the Feds widen their crackdown on computer tampering, some pioneers of the industry have joined to defend freedom of the keyboard ...
  • We Have Met The Enemy

    When Mick Jagger sang (in "Sympathy for the Devil") that "every cop is a criminal," he was being arty. But the hero cops in three new true crime books might admit he had a point--though not because they buy this stuff about the yinyangness of it all. Cops and criminals each need to know how the other thinks. And since both crime families and police recruit mainly from the working class, they share a common language and culture. "Let's get drunk," N.Y.P.D. detective Vincent Murano tells a prospective informant in his book Cop Hunter (320 pages Simon and Schuster. $19.95) "Let's get some pizza and have a lot of beers and relax and talk about this thing. I don't particularly like those people up there. I certainly don't like the D.A. from Brooklyn. I think he's got a hard-on for you." These intimate enemies trust each other to play by the rules. (Neither side, for instance, may conduct summary executions against the other.) When someone violates that tacit trust, business as usual is...
  • Paley's 'Hail Mary Pass'

    William Paley, 88-year-old founder of CBS, last year tried to revolutionize the beleaguered network, only to be told, gently, that he can no longer shape the institution he created. ...
  • 'Major League Mud Fight' Over The S&L Fiasco

    Attending a street fair in his Brooklyn district, New York Rep. Charles Schumer couldn't walk five feet without someone collaring him about the savings and loan bailout. In Rep. Dick Armey's suburban Texas district, voters are "just furious," says an aide. "They think these big-money guys got away with murder." As the cost of the S&L fiasco keeps climbing--$200 billion, $300 billion, maybe even $500 billion--angry voters are beginning to blame the politicians. The politicians, not surprisingly, are blaming one another. The fall elections, says a Republican operative, are shaping up as a "major league mud fight" over the scandal. ...
  • Fine Art Or Foul?

    The Rev. Donald Wildmon stood one day in the Galleria dell' Accademia in Florence contemplating Michelangelo's "David." What he saw was a figure in white marble, towering 14 feet above him. What he felt was awe. He felt different the day he saw Andres Serrano's "Piss Christ," a photo of a plastic crucifix immersed in urine--and learned that the National Endowment for the Arts had indirectly supported the artist. "Congress has enough sense to give money to fund art, but they don't have enough sense to know what kind of art they are funding," he thought. "That's weirdo." ...
  • A Slow Slide Toward War?

    Civilians would have been the target," George Bush said last week, explaining his decision to break off talks with the Palestine Liberation Organization in the wake of a failed Palestinian terrorist raid on Israel's coastline. The suspension was meant to underscore U.S. abhorrence of terrorism. But it also reflected a deeper concern: in the tinderbox of the Middle East, such a raid could lead to conflagration. What if the May 30 attack had succeeded and taken scores of civilian lives? Would Israel take revenge by attacking Libya, an apparent sponsor of the raid? Would Libyan leader Muammar Kaddafi call on Iraqi President Saddam Hussein to keep his promise to retaliate on behalf of his Arab brothers? Iraq might launch just "a few missiles" against Israeli targets, says Israeli terrorism expert Ariel Merari. Israel would be forced to respond. "Then you have a war," Merari says. "In the Middle East ... when the atmosphere is so belligerent, you don't need much." ...
  • Someone's Last Hurrah

    The Communist Party official has six telephones on his desk, a traditional sign of rank in Moscow. They used to ring constantly with calls from the party's Central Committee. But no one there has called him in the three months since Mikhail Gorbachev began shifting power from the party to a new executive presidency. The official is so bitter about being cut out of the decision-making process that he breaks longstanding Soviet practice and criticizes his party leader by name to a foreign visitor. "Gorbachev is now a one-man show," he says. "He and a few personal advisers make all the decisions." The visitor asks for examples of botched decisions. "Show me where something is working right these days," the official replies. ...
  • Rjr Tries To Salvage Its Junk

    Was it only last year that financier Henry Kravis and his partners borrowed a whopping $28 billion to buy R JR Nabisco in the biggest leveraged buyout in history? It seems like an age--namely, the age of excessive debt. Now, only 17 months later, the landscape is littered with casualties of overborrowing--Robert Campeau, Merv Griffin, Donald Trump. Kravis, whose name became synonymous with leveraged buyouts in the go-go 1980s, seems determined to avoid the same fate. Adapting to the pay-as-you-go 1990s, Kohlberg Kravis Roberts is planning to put IWR on a sounder financial footing. The firm indicated that it would I plow $1 .7 billion of new equity into the food and tobacco giant and retire some $4 billion of high-yield junk bonds. Said a Shearson Lehman Hutton trader, "It's the official end of the junk-bond era." ...
  • A Home Away From Home

    Every morning except Sundays, Dorothy Frutiger kisses her husband, Dick, goodbye and watches as he boards the van to the Cedar Acres Adult Day Care Center in Janesville, Wis. It's a long drive--30 miles--and Dick spends the time chatting with the other passengers who are still able to respond. Lately, he's taken to consoling a younger man, an Alzheimer's victim like himself, who doesn't like the idea of adult day care. A lot of the conversation seems nonsensical; some sentences stop in midthought. But the effort helps keep their minds active. And what is the alternative? Though he's only 62, Dick Frutiger would be watching TV in a nursing home if not for Cedar Acres. "He gets better care there than he would at home," says Dorothy, 58, who works full time as a typesetter. ...
  • Piece De Resistance

    On June 18,1940, Gen. Charles de Gaulle launched the valiant French Resistance movement with a stirring radio broadcast from London, urging French people to continue the struggle against the Nazi forces. Last week France marked the 50th anniversary of the broadcast with a startling temporary monument in Paris. A team of 21 artists painted a gigantic replica of the popular 1940s DucretetThomson radio and wrapped the canvas around the renowned Obelisk in the Place de la Concorde. World War II speeches poured from nearby speakers--and then the creation was dismantled, and the radio days were over.
  • To Russia, With Movie Deals

    The movie is pure Hollywood thriller, complete with a leaking nuclear reactor, panicking townspeople and an allstar cast, including Jon Voight and Jason Robards. But as filming began last month on "The Final Warning," a re-creation of the 1986 Chernobyl meltdown, the real drama was the choice of location. Cast and crew assembled before a nuclear plant in Kruchatov, 300 miles south of Moscow. In an unprecedented deal made possible by glasnost, the Soviet government has teamed with Carolco--best known, ironically, for financing the anti-communist Rambo pictures--to make the $4 million movie for Turner Network Television. ...
  • Not-So-Square Squires

    In the peerage of pop, British rocker Roger Daltrey is already royalty. Beyond the bandstand, though, the lead singer for The Who has found a place in an entirely separate Who's Who: he's become a country gentleman. The good Mr. Daltrey is the proud owner of a comfortable estate near the English village of Burwash--and not shy about it. For a recent American Express ad, he strolled around his private lake doing the famous, "Do you know me?" routine dressed in a Barbour jacket, cloth hat and Wellingtons. "I run this trout fishery," says the man who made millions singing "We won't get fooled again." He then makes his way . . . not to a limo, but a Land Rover. ...
  • Bad Time For Terrorists

    Colleagues at East Germany's People's Geothermic Enterprise knew the nondescript record keeper as "Dieter Lenz." During seven years in the plant's record-keeping department, Lenz worked odd hours and kept to himself. But the quiet 31-year-old allegedly had a violent past. Last week East German police took him away in handcuffs. They charged that he is really Henning Beer, a top entry on West Germany's most-wanted list as a suspected member of the Red Army Faction (RAF) terrorist gang. He was one of 10 RAF suspects arrested in East Germany in the last two weeks. A German investigative reporter noticed that during three RAF attacks, including the murder of Deutsche Bank chairman Alfred Herrhausen last fall, Dieter Lenz happened to be on vacation. ...
  • How The West Was Tamed

    As Petruchio, Morgan Freeman is a true cowboy suitor in the New York Shakespeare Festival's frontier version of "The Taming of the Shrew." The production, set in the old Southwest, began previews in Central Park last week. Ever the deadeye, Freeman uses a lasso to tame the prairie virago Kate (Tracey Ullman). "She's someone I know," says Ullman. "She's 40, intelligent, witty but has no man because there's no one to match her." Freeman "may think he's tamed me," she adds, "but I don't think he really has."
  • Mandela

    At a historic crossroads in Harlem Nelson Mandela staked his claim. One by one, he invoked the black heroes and martyrs whose words had echoed there before him: Marcus Garvey, Paul Robeson, Adam Clayton Powell Jr., Malcolm X, Martin Luther King Jr. There were perhaps 100,000 people pressed against the barricades, filling the streets in all four directions from the platform, and the roar swelled louder as each of the great names sounded. "I am here to claim you because ... you have claimed our struggle," Mandela said. "Harlem signifies the glory of resistance. We are on the verge of victory ... Death to racism! " That brought the loudest roar of all, a mighty ovation in the gathering dusk.With his regal bearing, his smiling serenity and his unbroken spirit after 27 years in South African prisons, Mandela was an authentic heir to the heroes' mantle. And in New York last week, the Harlem rally, a ticker-tape parade, a United Nations address and an ecstatic, chanting celebration in...
  • An Unusual Call From A Listener

    Geraldo should jump all over this one. During a radio talk show in New Orleans last week, noted sex therapist Dr. Judith Kuriansky instructed a female caller to give her inattentive husband "a real big ultimatum to push him off his chair." To which the caller replied, "Why don't you take your hand and push him off the chair. He's sitting two feet from you." The caller was Marilou Hunter, wife of the show's host, Ron Hunter. That night Marilou, 32, was fatally shot as she lay in bed with her husband. Hunter, 51, told police he awoke to find his wife bleeding from a self-inflicted chest wound. Beside her was Hunter's gun. For the record, Marilou accused Ron of physical abuse in one of the two separation suits she filed in the last two years. Hunter denied the claim and said she beat him. No charges have been filed in the death, pending a coroner's report, expected soon.
  • Taking Up Arms Against Aids

    Police riot squads are not a common sight at scientific meetings. But the Sixth International Conference on AIDS, held in San Francisco last week was special. Activists--many of whose lives now depend on the pace of scientific progress--were expected to outnumber the 12,000 conference delegates by 10 to one. The activists were angry, and local officials braced for the worst. In addition to the usual dining and sightseeing tips, the press kits handed out to arriving reporters included a letter from the chief of police, explaining what to do "if you find yourself within a group of demonstrators that is to be dispersed by crowd control officers" and "circumstances do not permit escape." ...
  • 'When You're Serious, Call Us'

    It was meant to shock, and it did. Needled by a congressman who blamed President Bush for the collapse of the Middle East "peace process," Secretary of State James Baker last week delivered a U.S. administration's sharpest public rebuke to an Israeli government since the 1966 Suez crisis. First he detailed how Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir scuttled his own peace plan and brought down the misnamed "national unity" government in March by balking at a compromise formula for talks with Palestinians. Baker complained that Israel's new right-wing government was posing more obstacles to talks. Then he offered the White House phone number: 1-202-456-1414. "When you're serious about peace, call us," he said. ...
  • Matchup

    She is not a nightmare yet," said Steffi Graf of 16-year-old Monica Seles, but Seles is certainly waking up women's tennis. With her double-fisted, double-grunting style, the young Yugoslavian beat Graf in straight sets at the French Open, becoming the youngest to win the title. She's even challenging Graf in the glamour department. But when Wimbledon begins next week, the sweatbands go back on.
  • No More Cash

    Soviet citizens are finding it easier to travel abroad, but an upcoming government ruling may cramp their style once they reach their destinations. This summer, Moscow will stop providing up to $200 to travelers at the tourist exchange rate (6.2 rubles for $1). The service is indispensable since it's illegal to take rubles outside the country, but Moscow can't afford the cash outflow any more. Future travelers will have to rely on the generosity of foreign friends and relatives because they'll be penniless when they arrive.
  • Value Judgments

    With the exception of veterans and schoolchildren, few Americans normally pause to I observe Flag Day. But this year the nation's attention was riveted on Old Glory. Last week the Supreme Court struck down a federal flag protection law, ruling 6 to 4 that although the desecration is offensive, it is a form of expression protected by the First Amendment. "Punishing desecration of the flag dilutes the very freedom that makes this emblem so revered, and worth revering," Justice William Brennan wrote for the majority. George Bush, who rode into office wrapped in the Stars and Stripes, immediately issued a call for a constitutional amendment banning desecration of the flag. As the GOP leadership jumped on the bandwagon--and Democrats played for time--amendment legislation began advancing through Congress. A House floor vote could come this week--the initial step in the campaign to alter the Bill of Rights for the first time in its 199-year history (page 18). ...
  • Barry: The Mayor's Last-Ditch Strategy?

    My ego is gone now," said Washington Mayor Marion Barry last week. "There was a time ... I would have said, "I don't care if I get five votes, I'm going to run'." While jury selection for his trial on 14 perjury and cocaine-related charges continued, Barry, 54, went into a television studio to record a 12-minute speech. The mayor's message: he would not seek a fourth term this fall. When the speech was broadcast, it settled one burning question. But Barry's withdrawal raised new speculation about his upcoming trial, the mayoral campaign--and the volatile race relations in the nation's capital. ...