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  • A Mixed Bag For Summer

    Schlock queen Danielle Steel says she wrote this novel of the Vietnam War despite her fear of offending "those who lived it." It probably is sleazy to use a national nightmare as backdrop for a trash best seller. Yet no one minds romances of the antebellum South; Steel's "Message from Nam" (Delacorte. $21.95)needbe taken no more seriously. You know the plot: heroine beds A and B, then finds true love with unlikely C. Just because C is an MLA (A and B die in combat) doesn't mean this book says anything about the war. Though Steel does try: "There were four hundred thousand American boys in Vietnam ... and nothing made sense anymore."The heroine is a "journalist," but we never see her at work. Here, complete, is the tale of her interviewing Lt. William Calley about My Lai: "The interview with him had been brief, and in some ways very painful." And after 26 of these novels, Steel can't write a sex scene. "She responded to him as she never had to anyone," goes a typically soft-focus...
  • Thoughts On Mayor Barry

    What do Genghis Khan, Richard Nixon, J. Edgar Hoover and D.C. Mayor Marion Barry have in common? We don't have all day, so I will tell you: they all were / are historic figures who did some good along with their much more famous bad and thus are a pain in the neck to analyze. ...
  • No Bailout For Gorb?

    It now seems very unlikely that a "Second Marshall Plan" for the Soviet Union will be approved at next month's economic summit in Houston. At a final strategy session last week, West German foreign-policy adviser Horst Teltschik urged his fellow "sherpas"--the advisers from the United States, Canada, Japan, France, Britain, Italy and the European Community, who are carrying the load for summit planning--to back a $20 billion bailout for Mikhail Gorbachev. Bonn, Teltschik said, was willing to bear more than its share of the burden for payments to maintain Soviet troops in East Germany and credit guarantees for the crumbling Soviet economy. In Bonn's view, the plan would ensure Soviet support for keeping Germany in NATO--and help keep Gorbachev in control. Washington argued it couldn't afford the plan and the others argued that a heavy investment at this time would be risky because of uncertainty about Gorbachev's future.
  • Aids The Next Ten Years

    A sense of crisis is hard to sustain. It thrives on earthquakes and tornadoes, plane crashes and terrorist bombings. But forces that kill people one at a time have away of fading into the psychic landscape. So, if you've stopped thinking of AIDS as an emergency, consider a few numbers. In 1984, when scientists identified the virus that causes the illness, fewer than 4,500 Americans had been stricken. Today more than 3,000 cases of AIDS are reported every month in this country; the total tops 130,000. An estimated 1 million Americans are infected with the virus--and by the end of the decade, most of those people will be sick. ...
  • A Musical Homecoming

    The Marsalis family, which threatens to corner the jazz market the way the Hunts once tried to dominate silver, has a new project: "The Resolution of Romance," on which trumpeter Wynton pairs with his father, Ellis, a revered New Orleans pianist. Wynton says the new recording represents his coming to grips with the standard jazz repertoire. For father and son, the 21-song set is also a musical homecoming: it is the first time the two have recorded together.
  • The Lost Picture Show

    As great paintings keep slipping from the grasp of museums into private collections, the Amon Carter Museum in Ft. Worth last week announced a stunning turnabout. From an unnamed source, the museum purchased Thomas Cole's "The Garden of Eden," a painting unseen in public since 1831 and never photographed until now. America's first great landscapist, Cole wanted to prove he was "no mere leaf painter" by depicting Eden as a distinctly New World glory. Drawing on Milton's poetic descriptions and on his own nature studies (the mountain in the background is Mount Chocorua in New Hampshire), he finished the picture just in time for the National Academy of Design's 1828 spring show. Shortly afterward, it sold for $400. Although the Amon Carter won't divulge the price, this example of what Cole called "a heavenly atmosphere in the pictures of the imagination" would bring millions on the open market. Let's hope we never find out exactly how much.
  • Madonna: From Boy Toy To Breathless

    In Madonna's stark video of her hit "Express Yourself," she struts around in a man tailored suit, grabbing her crotch and singing about female power: don't settle for second best in men, "if the time isn't right, then move on." Then the scene switches: a nude Madonna is chained to a bed, a dog collar around her neck, as a man takes her in his arms and they kiss. The end. In psychologist Lynne Layton's class on popular culture at Harvard University, the students are torn: is Madonna sending a feminist message? Or is she dusting off the old story of boy-ravishes-girl? If Madonna were in the class, she'd laugh. The video has no real meaning; her signals are always mixed. The message is simply, look at Madonna. ...
  • An Archbishop Rattles A Saber

    Excommunication is the harshest penalty the Roman Catholic Church can use to discipline wayward public figures. It bars them from all the sacraments except for penance and brands them as figures who, by their actions, have cut themselves off from the spiritual community of the church. Generally, excommunication is reserved for notorious heretics, schismatics and Catholic rulers who persecute the church. But last week, in a 19,000-word discourse published in his own archdiocesan newspaper, New York's Cardinal John J. O'Connor warned that "bishops may consider excommunication" as a last disciplinary resort against Catholic politicians who help to "multiply abortions by advocating legislation supporting abortion, or by making public funds available for abortion." O'Connor immediately denied that he had any particular politicians in mind, but there were at least a dozen New York office holders, beginning with Gov. Mario Cuomo, who fit the cardinal's categories. ...
  • Mob Rule In Romania

    Bucharest was a battlefield once more. Police moved to disperse a small antigovernment rally in a downtown square last week, and protesters replied with stones, then fire. The government matched force with force. When protesters stormed Romania's lone television station thousands of club-wielding coal miners were brought in to quell the "fascist rebellion. " The miners beat anyone suspected of opposing the regime, punching a young man to the ground for having long hair and whipping a woman with chains after finding an antigovernment leaflet in her bag. ...
  • Cloudy Future

    It's hard to keep Patrick Ewing earthbound. In "The Exorcist III: Legion," the "official" sequel to the head-spinning original, the basketball whiz has a silent cameo role as an oversize angel. The seven-foot Ewing appears in George C. Scott's dream about the afterlife. And if his acting career doesn't take off? Well, he still has his job as the demon center for the New York Knicks.
  • Panama's High-Profile Proconsul

    Ambassador Deane R. Hinton is eating waffles on his veranda overlooking Panama City. At 7:30 on a tropical morning, a hint of coolness seeps from the house through half-open glass doors. In the middle distance, birds wheel above the high-rise skyline. In other cities they might be sea gulls. Here they are vultures. Decaying, corrupt and vital to U.S. interests: this is Deane Hinton's kind of country. ...
  • S&Ls: Blaming The Media

    Who's to blame for the savings and loan scandal? The owners and regulators of the industry have had their turn, in a new Hotline poll, the public faults both George Bush (by 59 percent) and Congress (64 percent). Now, inevitably, anger is building at the media for failing to sound clear warnings about the worst financial mess in the nation's history. That failure is "a scandal in itself," concludes Ellen Hume, executive director of Harvard's Shorenstein Barone Center on the Press, Politics and Public Policy, and there should be "embarrassment and soul-searching at the highest levels of journalism." ...
  • Gorbachev Takes Out His Federalist Papers

    One nation or 15? Confronting his nationalities crisis last week, Mikhail Gorbachev tried to have it both ways. In order to preserve the Soviet Union, he proposed to dismantle it, replacing the present arrangement with a new, looser federation in which the current Soviet republics would have the rights of "sovereign states." The danger in Gorbachev's gambit was that his central government might end up presiding over an empty house. ...
  • Sub Deal

    Colorado Sen. Tim Wirth learned on a recent trip to South Korea that the Soviet Union has made a deal in which three Soviet Whiskeyclass subs will be scrapped in South Korea. The payment for the scrap? Several products, including running shoes and toothbrushes. . . . House members are scrambling for a way to get around paying staffers overtime. Congressional aides were exempt from overtime until the new minimum-wage act last year. This fall they will be entitled to it. Worried that overtime pay will balloon payroll costs, Pennsylvania Rep. Austin Murphy is proposing "comp time"-or extra days off-in lieu of cash.
  • Buzzwords

    Executive headhunters have their own vocabulary--and it's not always flattering to the job candidates: On the beach Unemployed, so harder to place. Class A, Class B Class A, the best candidate, a.k.a. a "walking fee." Class B is as it sounds. Stalking horse Class B candidate: sent to a prospective employer to make the Class A candidate look even better. Positioning Getting the client firm focused on the right candidate. Usage: "Let's send in a couple of stalking horses and then we'll have them positioned for the walking fee." Knockout A mistake that instantly knocks a candidate out of contention. Examples: Being too enthusiastic about a job or demeaning one's current employer.
  • The Junk Kings Auction Off Their Junk

    It was a bargain hunter's dream. "Over 2,000 offices!" exclaimed the auction ad. "Private offices including high-quality desks with matching credenzas, leather sofas ... exquisite corporate board & conference rooms . . . hundreds of tastefully appointed managerial & secretarial offices!" Even the kitchen sink--or, to be exact, "five complete corporate cafeterias." ...
  • The Trump Debt Crisis

    Remember this bit of history? Flush with petrodollars, the big U.S. banks loaned lavishly to Latin American and other Third World countries in the 1970s. As oil and commodity prices dropped, countries like Mexico and Brazil couldn't pay back the loans. So the banks threw more money at them, hoping the problem would somehow work itself out. Instead the countries just got mired in a deeper hole, and so did the banks. ...
  • Euro-Manners

    Here's a fresh angle on the New Europe. French extreme rightist Jean-Marie Le Pen and an associate swapped insults, spittle and blows to the groin last week with a Belgian socialist in the cafeteria of the European Parliament in Strasbourg. The brawl erupted after Robert Krieps, a socialist from Luxembourg, asked a group of lunching right-wingers if a speech that morning by Nelson Mandela had ruined their appetites. "Who's this dog?" asked Le Pen, according to press reports. Jose Happart, a Belgian socialist accompanying Krieps, told Le Pen to "go to hell." Le Pen spat at Happart and the brawl ensued.
  • Pam's Bash

    It's LIVE FROM THE KENNEDY CENTER with Pamela Harriman! Plus Crosby, Stills and Nash, Gladys Knight, Rodney Crowell, the Gypsy Kings and "Saturday Night Live's" Dana Carvey doing his impersonation of George Bush. Harriman hopes to raise $1.2 million for the Democratic Party with a gala at the center this week. Harriman sought advice from singer Paul Simon. who suggested SNL producer Lorne Michaels. "I have a background in the theater and lots of friends," says Harriman. The center had been off-limits to political fund raising until last year, when President Bush and the GOP changed the rules. Now Democrats have the stage.
  • Here Come The Mob And Van Gogh

    What's hot in Hollywood now that "Dick Tracy" has been released? The mob is making a big comeback. The making of"The Godfather, Part III" has been well reported, but there are at least four other gangster films in production: "Miller's Crossing," with Albert Finney; "GoodFellas," a Martin Scorsese film, starring Robert De Niro, based on "Wiseguy" by Nick Pileggi "The Krays," about twin hoods who terrorized Britain in the 1960s, and "State of Grace" (its working title), with Sean Penn and Ed Harris. U.S. fans can also look forward to a rush of foreign films about Vincent van Gogh, honoring this year's 100th anniversary of his death. Among them: "Vincent & Theo," a Robert Altman movie already shown on European TV; "Vincent and Me," a Canadian film about a 12-year-old girl's sketches sold to the Japanese as van Gogh's newly discovered childhood drawings, and Akira Kurosawa's "Dreams," featuring director Scorsese as van Gogh.
  • Silver-Haired Athletes Reaching For The Gold

    A male midlife crisis used to be a condition characterized by the pursuit of leggy showgirls and the wearing of toupees. No one would think of buying a ticket to see a man in such a pathetic state. But last week a 43-year-old Texan faced a truly compelling crisis--how to pitch to the best team in baseball, the Oakland Athletics. And he survived it in exemplary style: by hurling a no-hitter. The Rangers' Nolan Ryan is the oldest person ever to pull off that feat--but he is hardly the only middle-aged man to muscle his way into the sports pages of late. From California (where Mark Spitz, 40, is trying to swim his way into the 1992 Olympics) to New York (where jockey Angel Cordero, 47, boots home winners at Belmont Park), silver-haired athletes are going for the gold. Some, such as golfer Jack Nicklaus and bowler Earl Anthony, have dabbled in the senior circuit, a kind of parallel universe where everyone wears Sansabelt slacks. But despite what science says about the body converting...
  • A Wall Of Water Washes Through Ohio

    Nine-year-old Amber Colvin was playing cards with her friend Kerrie Trigg when the house began to fill up with water. It was late evening, and a series of rogue thunderstorms had just dumped five and a half inches of rain on the Ohio-West Virginia border region below Wheeling, W.Va. Wegee Creek, normally a placid stream, was rising to almost unbelievable heights, and Amber and Kerrie climbed into a bathtub for protection from the swirling water. Then the house collapsed. Before long, Amber found herself swept downstream into the Ohio River. Somehow she survived by clinging to two logs. "I had them for a long time," she said afterward. "I just drifted." ...
  • The 'Slap Flap' Explained

    Remember Sondra Gotlieb? She's the wife of the former Canadian ambassador who became notorious when she slapped her social secretary during a 1986 embassy dinner for Prime Minister Brian Mulroney. (The secretary had told her seating arrangements had to be changed.) Now, in "Washington Rollercoaster," a gossipy account of her seven years on Embassy Row--so far available only in Canada--Gotlieb tells us the "slap flap" happened because she was exhausted, upset over a slight by Nancy Reagan and starved from dieting to fit into a new dress. Among other tidbits: she says publicly what much of Washington knew privately--former White House chief of staff Don Regan spread false rumors that the then national-security adviser Robert McFarlane was having an "adulterous affair."
  • Tinkering With The Constitution

    When they forged the Constitution 203 years ago, the Founding Fathers made it so difficult to amend that Patrick Henry complained the document would permit the "most contemptible minority" to frustrate progress. Changes, after all, could be made only with the vote of two thirds of both the Senate and House memberships, followed by three quarters (now 38) of the state legislatures. He might have had a point. (Fathers are like that.) While 10 amendments were added in 1791--the Bill of Rights--just 16 others have made their way into the national charter since. ...
  • 'Adam Smith' Goes To The Land Of Marx

    Most Soviets don't even I have a checking account--let alone a full grasp I of the capitalist system. But I starting this fall, they'll be I able to immerse themselves in such sophisticated free-market concepts as junk-bond trading and high-stakes investing. Last week producers of "Adam's Smith's Money World," public television's equivalent of Capitalism 101, announced they will broadcast the show in the Soviet Union, beginning as early as September. To be dubbed in Russian, "Money World" will, become the first American i business program to appear on Soviet television, where American shows of any sort are uncommon. "Adam Smith has come to the land of Karl Marx," says "Money World" host George J. W. Goodman, who uses the pseudonym of 18th-century economist Adam Smith. "This shows how fast at least some things are moving in the Soviet Union." ...
  • A Split In Now

    The Illinois Senate race has split the National Organization for Women. NOW's Illinois chapter has endorsed Democratic Sen. Paul Simon. But NOW national president Molly Yard has called Simon's pre-1984 record on abortion "awful" and hinted strongly that the national organization will back his GOP opponent, Rep. Lynn Martin, in part because she is a woman. The local unit argues that Simon outscores Martin on a number of other women's issues, including Head Start, day care and infant health care.
  • More Oil On The Waters

    From the radio room five decks above, the blast felt like "sort of a bump . . . a vibration," the captain later recalled. Then the room went dark and the corridor outside began to fill with smoke. "I looked forward and saw bright flames coming from the pump room top. Flames were licking up right over the bridge." The captain, C. M. Mahidhara, ran to his quarters, where his wife and two children were asleep. "Get out! Get out!" he screamed. Mahidhara radioed a nearby workboat to stand by for rescue. Thirty-seven people--including the captain's family--were taken off the oil tanker Mega Borg that night. The bodies of two crewmen were found near the wreckage of the pump-room hatch cover, which had been blown more than 100 yards along the deck. Two other crewmen were presumed to have died in the weeklong fire that reduced the 886-foot ship to a smoldering hulk--a disaster that demonstrated again that the transportation of large quantities of oil remains one of the riskiest enterprises...
  • The Con Games People Play

    John Guare's Six Degrees of Separation begins with a scene of pure urban hysteria. Ouisa Kittredge (Stockard Channing) and her art-dealer husband, Flan (John Cunningham), flap about their ritzy New York apartment in a frenzy: they've discovered that they've been hoodwinked by a young black man, Paul (James McDaniel), who's passed himself off as the son of actor Sidney Poitier. Claiming to be short on cash while awaiting the return of his "father," Paul has talked himself into the hospitality of Flan and Ouisa, who later discover their guest copulating with a male hooker. Frazzled with fear and horror, the couple throw Paul out. It turns out that Paul has pulled a similar scam on other upscale New Yorkers. Events escalate into a surreal comedy that highlights the confusion between illusion and reality in the increasingly chaotic metropolis. ...
  • Tracymania

    It's that guy in the yellow overcoat again. Have the feeling you've seen him somewhere before? Like, maybe, everywhere you turn? And now here he is on the cover of NEWSWEEK. Small world, isn't it? And now here you are, actually reading another story about William Bendix in "Brick Lacy." ...
  • Interrogating The Prisoners

    Drug czar William Bennett has a new strategy in the war on drugs: systematically interrogate the captives. The Justice Department is preparing a major effort to build a comprehensive CIA-style database on the Colombian drug cartels by questioning hundreds, perhaps ultimately thousands, of drug dealers serving time in U.S. prisons. "We have a big human intelligence resource sitting in cages right here in the United States," says a senior administration official. "We don't even have to go hunt for them. " FBI and DEA field agents will thoroughly grill drug traffickers about their operations, with the possibility of earlier parole for those who cooperate with the program.
  • Do You Speak Deals?

    He is an optimist by nature. And why not? Michael Sumichrast fled Czechoslovakia in 1948, after the communists took power, then made millions in Ohio real estate. Now, 42 years later, he's back--the first of a new breed of American pioneers hoping to cash in on the revolutions in Eastern Europe. He brings money, know-how and an unshakable capitalist faith. And, partly because he is first, he has had a hero's welcome. He sits in on government cabinet meetings. He's featured on the nightly news. Taxi drivers refuse to take his money. The reason, as one cabby put it: "I think it's great that you're trying to bring America to Czechoslovakia." ...
  • Sparkle, Sparkle

    We all know Imelda Marcos was an Olympic shopper for shoes, but she also loved jewelry. She liked to sparkle so much, prosecutors at her New York trial alleged last week, that she spent $6,671,919 on jewelry between 1980 and 1986. The government contends the money she used was looted from the Philippine treasury and a government bank. Here's a list list what Imelda spent and where:Van Cleef & Arpels, $1,575,213; Fred Leighton, $1,015,247; J.S.S. Young, $825,000; Gaston Issert, $668,923; Cantabrican, $497,738; Cartier, $355,451; Bulgari, $344,250; Isi Fischzang, $314,550; A La Vieille Russie, $157,721; others, $917,826.
  • Mexican Standoff

    A Harvard-educated economist, Carlos Salinas de Gortari was once dismissed as a bland technocrat. No more. Since becoming president of Mexico in late 1988, he has been full of surprises. He jailed the corrupt leader of the oil workers' union. He has relaxed restrictions against foreign investment, sold state companies and reduced inflation. His latest surprise-formally presented to President George Bush last week-is a proposed free-trade agreement between the United States and Mexico. ...
  • Upside Down From Down Under

    Circus Oz contains no animals ("Don't need 'cm"), no ring, no sawdust, no wizard even. But this combo of 21 muscular and multitalented Aussies puts plenty o' wizardry into its postmodern version of the big top. Oz specializes in death defying stunts done with disarming humor to the rhythm of rock and roll, played by the acrobats themselves. On their current U.S. tour, they blithely blast "girl scouts" from cannons and unfold entire musical skits on the ceiling. Says manager Susan Provan, "It's all done with magnets."
  • Inside The Invasion

    At 12:56 a.m. last Dec. 20, five minutes before U.S. forces' biggest battle since Vietnam, Lt. Col. Lynn Moore sat tensely in an OH-58 scout helicopter, circling the cloudy skies above El Renacer prison and eying his target through night-vision goggles. Moore's mission: to rescue the 64 prisoners inside, including two Americans. The jail bristled with guards, but the colonel had told his men they could take it without a single loss. For the past nine days, 80 paratroopers from the 82nd Airborne Division had been rehearsing the assault, sometimes right outside the prison walls. ...
  • How To Succeed In Show Business--Again

    During his complicated makeup for "Tru," Robert Morse's wavy hair disappears under a plastic skull cap. "That's my head condom," he lisps, already into the voice of Truman Capote. It's a joke the late author and social butterfly would have cackled at. The lisp, the cackle, the whine, the snorts, coughs and guffaws of Capote are part of a brilliant and poignant performance in Jay Presson Allen's one-man play. It won Morse, 69, what was clearly the most popular of the Tony Awards as best leading actor. ...
  • The Doctor's Suicide Van

    Sometimes, when ethical debates have run on interminably, it takes a shocking incident to sear the old questions back into the public consciousness. So it was with the case of the Oregon grandmother, the Detroit pathologist and his homemade suicide machine. She was diagnosed as having Alzheimer's disease--and preferred taking her life to slowly losing the mind she cherished. He was a zealot who had searched for an appropriate patient to try his controversial device. Janet Adkins read a short item about Jack Kevorkian in NEWSWEEK last fall and saw him on the "Donahue" show. She and her husband flew 2,000 miles to meet him and discuss his device over dinner. Last Monday, while her husband waited at a nearby hotel, they drove to a suburban campsite in Kevorkian's rusty Volkswagen van. He inserted a needle in her arm and started saline flowing. She pressed a button on his death machine that first sent a sedative, then deadly potassium chloride racing to her heart. ...
  • A Rupture?

    Palestine Liberation Organization officials in Tunis fear Washington will suspend contacts with the PLO, perhaps as early as next week. Despite repeated appeals from the Bush administration, PLO chairman Yasir Arafat is unlikely to denounce the May 30 raid on Israel by an extremist PLO faction and risk further fragmenting the organization, the sources say. Political pressure is mounting for a U.S. rupture with the PLO. The White House has withstood pressure for sanctions against China and the Soviet Union over Lithuania and wants to continue the dialogue with the PLO, but the strength of Israel's friends in the United States may make it impossible to avoid at least a temporary break.
  • Saying Yes To Taxes

    In California, voters had plenty of time to think about the legacy of the Great Tax Revolt they began back in 1978. As they sat in their cars, stuck in bumper-to-bumper traffflc on the state's congested freeways, they could contemplate the consequences of spending less per capita on transportation than any other state in the union. As their frustration rose, their eyes wandered, perhaps, to roadside billboards that asked, HAD ENOUGH TRAFFIC? VOTE YES ON 111. ...
  • Hot Summer For Moscow

    Welcome home, comrade president: Mikhail Gorbachev returned from the Washington summit last week to find his Central Asian lands engulfed in virtual civil war. It began with a property dispute between Kirgiz and Uzbek neighbors in the town of Osh near the Chinese border. But in a now familiar pattern, ethnic conflict escalated into an attack on the symbols of Soviet power. Armed demonstrators besieged Interior Ministry garrisons. Angry students in Frunze, the Kirgiz capital, demanded that the local leadership resign and pelted the Communist Party chief with rocks when he appeared at a rally to appeal for calm. By the weekend, more than 100 people had been killed and over 400 injured. With local police outgunned, an unhappy Soviet military struggled to keep the peace. ...
  • A Comedy Comeback

    Mary Tyler Moore couldn't bring it off. Neither could the ever-lovable Lucy. For some elusive reason, making TV comebacks is tougher for funny women than for funny men (witness Bob Newhart and the Cos). Behold, then, Carol Burnett. Her triumphal reincarnation as the star of NBC's sleeper-hit "Carol & Company" isn't merely odds defying. (How many 57-year-old comedians manage to crack Nielsen's top 15 after being away for more than a decade?) It's also happening within TV's riskiest format. The anthology approach--presenting a single story with different characters each week--hasn't reaped ratings for a woman since the last time Loretta Young swirled through that doorway. ...
  • High Style And Low Comedy

    The misadvantage of Mr. Wilt is incredible. What's incredible is that this brand of repressed, dotty, English humor is still around. You would have thought the anarchic Monty Python gang would have blown away the kind of comedy once exemplified by Terry-Thomas, Ian Carmichael and the "Carry On" movies. Even more incredible is that I like this sort of humor. The sort where the thickheaded cop, Inspector Flint, grilling an innocent man, shoves a bunch of papers at him and says: "Did you write this, Mr. Wilt?" Wilt: "Yes, I did." Cop: "Don't try to deny it, Mr. Wilt." As David Letterman would say, that's comedy. ...
  • Ivana: Success Is The Best Revenge

    It is dinner time in the atrium of The Plaza hotel. Darla Welsh, chaperon for a high-school prom group from Tenafly, N.J., is busy surveying the splendor: vaulted ceilings, crystal chandeliers, palm trees all around. "Beautiful," exclaims Welsh, who is decked out in a black taffeta gown with a huge white bow. But what are she and her students really dying to see? "We're hoping to catch a glimpse of Ivana," she says. ...
  • Poetry Redux

    It's been 41 years since the Library of Congress awarded a national poetry prize (the 1948 prize to pro-Fascist Ezra Pound caused Congress to put the award on ice). But the ban has been lifted, and in October the library will present the first Rebekah Johnson Bobbitt Prize. It's in memory of LBJ's sister, a poetry lover.
  • Time: No Conflict

    What responsibility does the magazine group of Time Warner have to let its readers know that a film it praises in a news story was produced by the movie part of the corporation? None, if you ask the company. Last week's curious cover story in Time was about "Presumed Innocent" author Scott Turow, whose new book "The Burden of Proof" has received mixed reviews. The article offered lavish details about the upcoming movie version of "Presumed Innocent" but neglected to mention Warner Bros. made the movie. Time spokeswoman Jennifer Epstein said the magazine did not have a responsibility to report the corporate connection and denied there was a conflict of interest. She also said Time never identifies which movie company made a film.
  • An Opening To The East?

    Germany: in or out? That is the question. Will the Soviets accept a united Germany inside NATO? After the Washington summit between George Bush and Mikhail Gorbachev, U.S. officials were discouraged. The Soviets were stonewalling. "The only ideas they offered were nonstarters like a Germany in both pacts, or airy-fairy visions of a PanEuropean security order . . . To our suggestions, they simply said nyet," said a U.S. official. But now the Soviets are signaling readiness to deal--without holding unification hostage to their security fears. "For the first time, rather than questioning the fact of Germany in NATO. the Soviets seem to be exploring ways to dress it up and sell it," said a U.S. official. ...
  • In Italy: 'The Injustice Of A Nation'

    Last week's funeral of 3-year-old Miriam Schillaci was a moment of public remorse. The ceremony was broadcast nationwide; thousands of Italians sent flowers to the family. President Francesco Cossiga lamented "the injustice of a nation and the suffering it has caused you." ...
  • Got A Right To Sing The Blues

    Basin Street of New Orleans is the subject of a fabled jazz standard. But these days, piano-playing prodigy Harry Connick Jr. might be more inclined to sing the blues of another thoroughfare in his native city--Poydras Street, site of the federal courthouse. There, this week, his father-the district attorney for the Big Easy since 1974--faces trial on charges that he aided an illegal gambling operation. At 22, Harry Connick Jr.-- with a Grammy, a gold record and a British film debut this fall-has the world at his feet. At 64, Harry Connick Sr. could face 25 years in the pokey and the end of his political career. ...
  • Korea's Heartbreaking Hills

    While Roh Tae Woo was in the United States last week discussing Korea's future, I was in Korea--searching for the past. In 1951, I served in the Korean War as a lieutenant in the U.S. Marine Corps. I had not been back since. Now I was hoping to find answers to questions that had haunted me for years: Would I be able to find the hills where my comrades and I fought? What would my emotions be if I did? Would being in Korea again, even for a brief visit, change my feelings about the war? ...
  • Shaping Up

    Sharon Stone, 32, has the right mental and physical stuff to act in both Woody Allen's brooding "Stardust Memories" (1980) and Arnold Schwarzenegger's sci-fi megahit, "Total Recall." She refused to have a stunt double for her role as Arnold's wife, a karate-chopping undercover agent. Her costar, she says, made fun of her rigorous workout routine. "In another year," he told her, "you'll be a truck driver." Not likely. Stone's distinctly feminine form is on display in the July Playboy. Seeing the 10-page spread "has done wonders for my image of my body," she says. "I used to dress like a Japanese bag lady--60 layers of black clothes. Now I wear as little as possible."
  • Ohio Is Talking...

    About a sexually graphic speech by the wife of Gov. Richard Celeste. In an April address to 1,000 gay-rights supporters in Cincinnati, Dagmar Celeste quoted a lesbian writer that being a lesbian meant "an erotic passion . . . a wet sweet sweat. Our breasts, our mouths, our c--s, our intertangled hair . . . " The speech, reported last week in the Ohio gay press, was picked up by newspapers. Celeste, in Iowa testing for a possible presidential bid, told reporters any inference that Dagmar is a lesbian was "ridiculous," and that she was merely showing solidarity with gays.
  • Roh: 'North Korea Will Start To Open Up'

    "The cold-war ice on the Korean Peninsula has now begun to crack, "said South Korean President Roh Tae Woo last week after meeting Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev in San Francisco. In an interview with NEWSWEEK's Tokyo bureau chief Bradley Martin, he elaborated: ...
  • The Journey Up From Guilt

    Some developments that may seem as different as chalk and cheese actually are part of a single change: The middle class has begun giving up guilt. This moral movement, still gathering strength, is apparent in such disparate phenomena as California's primary and the career of Margaret Thatcher. And to any American making the journey up from guilt, there must be an amusing obtuseness in this headline from The Chronicle of Higher Education: ...