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  • Do You Speak Deals?

    He is an optimist by nature. And why not? Michael Sumichrast fled Czechoslovakia in 1948, after the communists took power, then made millions in Ohio real estate. Now, 42 years later, he's back--the first of a new breed of American pioneers hoping to cash in on the revolutions in Eastern Europe. He brings money, know-how and an unshakable capitalist faith. And, partly because he is first, he has had a hero's welcome. He sits in on government cabinet meetings. He's featured on the nightly news. Taxi drivers refuse to take his money. The reason, as one cabby put it: "I think it's great that you're trying to bring America to Czechoslovakia." ...
  • Sparkle, Sparkle

    We all know Imelda Marcos was an Olympic shopper for shoes, but she also loved jewelry. She liked to sparkle so much, prosecutors at her New York trial alleged last week, that she spent $6,671,919 on jewelry between 1980 and 1986. The government contends the money she used was looted from the Philippine treasury and a government bank. Here's a list list what Imelda spent and where:Van Cleef & Arpels, $1,575,213; Fred Leighton, $1,015,247; J.S.S. Young, $825,000; Gaston Issert, $668,923; Cantabrican, $497,738; Cartier, $355,451; Bulgari, $344,250; Isi Fischzang, $314,550; A La Vieille Russie, $157,721; others, $917,826.
  • Mexican Standoff

    A Harvard-educated economist, Carlos Salinas de Gortari was once dismissed as a bland technocrat. No more. Since becoming president of Mexico in late 1988, he has been full of surprises. He jailed the corrupt leader of the oil workers' union. He has relaxed restrictions against foreign investment, sold state companies and reduced inflation. His latest surprise-formally presented to President George Bush last week-is a proposed free-trade agreement between the United States and Mexico. ...
  • Upside Down From Down Under

    Circus Oz contains no animals ("Don't need 'cm"), no ring, no sawdust, no wizard even. But this combo of 21 muscular and multitalented Aussies puts plenty o' wizardry into its postmodern version of the big top. Oz specializes in death defying stunts done with disarming humor to the rhythm of rock and roll, played by the acrobats themselves. On their current U.S. tour, they blithely blast "girl scouts" from cannons and unfold entire musical skits on the ceiling. Says manager Susan Provan, "It's all done with magnets."
  • Inside The Invasion

    At 12:56 a.m. last Dec. 20, five minutes before U.S. forces' biggest battle since Vietnam, Lt. Col. Lynn Moore sat tensely in an OH-58 scout helicopter, circling the cloudy skies above El Renacer prison and eying his target through night-vision goggles. Moore's mission: to rescue the 64 prisoners inside, including two Americans. The jail bristled with guards, but the colonel had told his men they could take it without a single loss. For the past nine days, 80 paratroopers from the 82nd Airborne Division had been rehearsing the assault, sometimes right outside the prison walls. ...
  • How To Succeed In Show Business--Again

    During his complicated makeup for "Tru," Robert Morse's wavy hair disappears under a plastic skull cap. "That's my head condom," he lisps, already into the voice of Truman Capote. It's a joke the late author and social butterfly would have cackled at. The lisp, the cackle, the whine, the snorts, coughs and guffaws of Capote are part of a brilliant and poignant performance in Jay Presson Allen's one-man play. It won Morse, 69, what was clearly the most popular of the Tony Awards as best leading actor. ...
  • The Doctor's Suicide Van

    Sometimes, when ethical debates have run on interminably, it takes a shocking incident to sear the old questions back into the public consciousness. So it was with the case of the Oregon grandmother, the Detroit pathologist and his homemade suicide machine. She was diagnosed as having Alzheimer's disease--and preferred taking her life to slowly losing the mind she cherished. He was a zealot who had searched for an appropriate patient to try his controversial device. Janet Adkins read a short item about Jack Kevorkian in NEWSWEEK last fall and saw him on the "Donahue" show. She and her husband flew 2,000 miles to meet him and discuss his device over dinner. Last Monday, while her husband waited at a nearby hotel, they drove to a suburban campsite in Kevorkian's rusty Volkswagen van. He inserted a needle in her arm and started saline flowing. She pressed a button on his death machine that first sent a sedative, then deadly potassium chloride racing to her heart. ...
  • A Rupture?

    Palestine Liberation Organization officials in Tunis fear Washington will suspend contacts with the PLO, perhaps as early as next week. Despite repeated appeals from the Bush administration, PLO chairman Yasir Arafat is unlikely to denounce the May 30 raid on Israel by an extremist PLO faction and risk further fragmenting the organization, the sources say. Political pressure is mounting for a U.S. rupture with the PLO. The White House has withstood pressure for sanctions against China and the Soviet Union over Lithuania and wants to continue the dialogue with the PLO, but the strength of Israel's friends in the United States may make it impossible to avoid at least a temporary break.
  • Saying Yes To Taxes

    In California, voters had plenty of time to think about the legacy of the Great Tax Revolt they began back in 1978. As they sat in their cars, stuck in bumper-to-bumper traffflc on the state's congested freeways, they could contemplate the consequences of spending less per capita on transportation than any other state in the union. As their frustration rose, their eyes wandered, perhaps, to roadside billboards that asked, HAD ENOUGH TRAFFIC? VOTE YES ON 111. ...
  • Hot Summer For Moscow

    Welcome home, comrade president: Mikhail Gorbachev returned from the Washington summit last week to find his Central Asian lands engulfed in virtual civil war. It began with a property dispute between Kirgiz and Uzbek neighbors in the town of Osh near the Chinese border. But in a now familiar pattern, ethnic conflict escalated into an attack on the symbols of Soviet power. Armed demonstrators besieged Interior Ministry garrisons. Angry students in Frunze, the Kirgiz capital, demanded that the local leadership resign and pelted the Communist Party chief with rocks when he appeared at a rally to appeal for calm. By the weekend, more than 100 people had been killed and over 400 injured. With local police outgunned, an unhappy Soviet military struggled to keep the peace. ...
  • A Comedy Comeback

    Mary Tyler Moore couldn't bring it off. Neither could the ever-lovable Lucy. For some elusive reason, making TV comebacks is tougher for funny women than for funny men (witness Bob Newhart and the Cos). Behold, then, Carol Burnett. Her triumphal reincarnation as the star of NBC's sleeper-hit "Carol & Company" isn't merely odds defying. (How many 57-year-old comedians manage to crack Nielsen's top 15 after being away for more than a decade?) It's also happening within TV's riskiest format. The anthology approach--presenting a single story with different characters each week--hasn't reaped ratings for a woman since the last time Loretta Young swirled through that doorway. ...
  • High Style And Low Comedy

    The misadvantage of Mr. Wilt is incredible. What's incredible is that this brand of repressed, dotty, English humor is still around. You would have thought the anarchic Monty Python gang would have blown away the kind of comedy once exemplified by Terry-Thomas, Ian Carmichael and the "Carry On" movies. Even more incredible is that I like this sort of humor. The sort where the thickheaded cop, Inspector Flint, grilling an innocent man, shoves a bunch of papers at him and says: "Did you write this, Mr. Wilt?" Wilt: "Yes, I did." Cop: "Don't try to deny it, Mr. Wilt." As David Letterman would say, that's comedy. ...
  • Ivana: Success Is The Best Revenge

    It is dinner time in the atrium of The Plaza hotel. Darla Welsh, chaperon for a high-school prom group from Tenafly, N.J., is busy surveying the splendor: vaulted ceilings, crystal chandeliers, palm trees all around. "Beautiful," exclaims Welsh, who is decked out in a black taffeta gown with a huge white bow. But what are she and her students really dying to see? "We're hoping to catch a glimpse of Ivana," she says. ...
  • Poetry Redux

    It's been 41 years since the Library of Congress awarded a national poetry prize (the 1948 prize to pro-Fascist Ezra Pound caused Congress to put the award on ice). But the ban has been lifted, and in October the library will present the first Rebekah Johnson Bobbitt Prize. It's in memory of LBJ's sister, a poetry lover.
  • Time: No Conflict

    What responsibility does the magazine group of Time Warner have to let its readers know that a film it praises in a news story was produced by the movie part of the corporation? None, if you ask the company. Last week's curious cover story in Time was about "Presumed Innocent" author Scott Turow, whose new book "The Burden of Proof" has received mixed reviews. The article offered lavish details about the upcoming movie version of "Presumed Innocent" but neglected to mention Warner Bros. made the movie. Time spokeswoman Jennifer Epstein said the magazine did not have a responsibility to report the corporate connection and denied there was a conflict of interest. She also said Time never identifies which movie company made a film.
  • An Opening To The East?

    Germany: in or out? That is the question. Will the Soviets accept a united Germany inside NATO? After the Washington summit between George Bush and Mikhail Gorbachev, U.S. officials were discouraged. The Soviets were stonewalling. "The only ideas they offered were nonstarters like a Germany in both pacts, or airy-fairy visions of a PanEuropean security order . . . To our suggestions, they simply said nyet," said a U.S. official. But now the Soviets are signaling readiness to deal--without holding unification hostage to their security fears. "For the first time, rather than questioning the fact of Germany in NATO. the Soviets seem to be exploring ways to dress it up and sell it," said a U.S. official. ...
  • In Italy: 'The Injustice Of A Nation'

    Last week's funeral of 3-year-old Miriam Schillaci was a moment of public remorse. The ceremony was broadcast nationwide; thousands of Italians sent flowers to the family. President Francesco Cossiga lamented "the injustice of a nation and the suffering it has caused you." ...
  • Got A Right To Sing The Blues

    Basin Street of New Orleans is the subject of a fabled jazz standard. But these days, piano-playing prodigy Harry Connick Jr. might be more inclined to sing the blues of another thoroughfare in his native city--Poydras Street, site of the federal courthouse. There, this week, his father-the district attorney for the Big Easy since 1974--faces trial on charges that he aided an illegal gambling operation. At 22, Harry Connick Jr.-- with a Grammy, a gold record and a British film debut this fall-has the world at his feet. At 64, Harry Connick Sr. could face 25 years in the pokey and the end of his political career. ...
  • Korea's Heartbreaking Hills

    While Roh Tae Woo was in the United States last week discussing Korea's future, I was in Korea--searching for the past. In 1951, I served in the Korean War as a lieutenant in the U.S. Marine Corps. I had not been back since. Now I was hoping to find answers to questions that had haunted me for years: Would I be able to find the hills where my comrades and I fought? What would my emotions be if I did? Would being in Korea again, even for a brief visit, change my feelings about the war? ...
  • Shaping Up

    Sharon Stone, 32, has the right mental and physical stuff to act in both Woody Allen's brooding "Stardust Memories" (1980) and Arnold Schwarzenegger's sci-fi megahit, "Total Recall." She refused to have a stunt double for her role as Arnold's wife, a karate-chopping undercover agent. Her costar, she says, made fun of her rigorous workout routine. "In another year," he told her, "you'll be a truck driver." Not likely. Stone's distinctly feminine form is on display in the July Playboy. Seeing the 10-page spread "has done wonders for my image of my body," she says. "I used to dress like a Japanese bag lady--60 layers of black clothes. Now I wear as little as possible."
  • Ohio Is Talking...

    About a sexually graphic speech by the wife of Gov. Richard Celeste. In an April address to 1,000 gay-rights supporters in Cincinnati, Dagmar Celeste quoted a lesbian writer that being a lesbian meant "an erotic passion . . . a wet sweet sweat. Our breasts, our mouths, our c--s, our intertangled hair . . . " The speech, reported last week in the Ohio gay press, was picked up by newspapers. Celeste, in Iowa testing for a possible presidential bid, told reporters any inference that Dagmar is a lesbian was "ridiculous," and that she was merely showing solidarity with gays.
  • Roh: 'North Korea Will Start To Open Up'

    "The cold-war ice on the Korean Peninsula has now begun to crack, "said South Korean President Roh Tae Woo last week after meeting Soviet President Mikhail Gorbachev in San Francisco. In an interview with NEWSWEEK's Tokyo bureau chief Bradley Martin, he elaborated: ...
  • The Journey Up From Guilt

    Some developments that may seem as different as chalk and cheese actually are part of a single change: The middle class has begun giving up guilt. This moral movement, still gathering strength, is apparent in such disparate phenomena as California's primary and the career of Margaret Thatcher. And to any American making the journey up from guilt, there must be an amusing obtuseness in this headline from The Chronicle of Higher Education: ...
  • Cruising With Fergie

    Being Mum to two tots has not chastened the Duchess of York. Last week, touring Jaguar's new headquarters in Mahwah, N.J., Fergie sported a microskirt as racy as the company's cars. Urged to climb into an XJR10 with Prince Andrew, however, she exercised the royal option of not making a fool of herself.
  • Will Sam Take The Fall?

    ABC executives already have an excuse in case the wildly hyped but deeply troubled news magazine "Prime Time Live" continues to founder: blame Sam. Although most of the show's producers are high on Sam Donaldson and sometimes down on Diane Sawyer, network executives such as Roone Arledge want to protect their heavy investment in Sawyer. The ABC brass apparently thinks Donaldson is "too hot" a figure for Sawyer's cool "star presence." Arledge was unavailable for comment. To separate the hot from the cool, ABC has decided to keep Donaldson in Washington and Sawyer in New York, rather than having the two coanchor from New York (ABC maintains the separation is only a matter of reporting logistics). Sam and Diane remain friendly and are eager to improve what they realize are major problems with the show.
  • Kurt Factor

    After intense jockeying between Austria and France to host the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe this fall, the French have reportedly won--in part because of the "Waldheim factor." The United States and several other countries passed the word that they were uneasy about using Austria as the site because of President Kurt Waldheim's Nazi past. Austria then promised that Waldheim would be nowhere in sight during the meetings says a U.S. official. But the French lobbied hard for Paris. The White House also backed France because it wants its support for a united Germany in NATO.
  • Japan Answers The 64-Megabit Question

    Advantage: Japan. Last week, Hitachi Ltd. unveiled the prototype for a new semiconductor that leapfrogs over a generation of memory-chip technology. These chips are essential to computers but are also finding use in such products as compact disc players and televisions. Hitachi's new dynamic access memory (DRAM) chip has a capacity of 64 megabits, or the equivalent of more than 500 newspaper pages. That's 16 times more storage than the current top-of-theline, four-megabit chips distributed by IBM and others. The relentless improvement in chip density has led Cypress Semiconductor founder T. J. Rodgers to affect a ho-hum attitude: "You hear about the newest generation I of chips, and you look down at your watch and say, is it 1991 yet?" But the crushing cost of | developing each new generation of DRAM chips is forcing American firms out of the process, giving dominance to the more well-heeled and patient Japanese. ...
  • Breaking Ice In The Pacific

    At San Francisco's Fairmont Hotel, South Korean President Roh Tae Woo beamed with excitement. Beside him stood Mikhail Gorbachev, tired and stiff. It was hard to believe the two leaders attended the same meeting. "Prospects for peace and eventual unification of the Korean Peninsula are growing brighter," Roh jubilantly told reporters. Gorbachev was far more restrained. Asked if last week's meeting would hasten Moscow and Seoul toward full diplomatic relations, the Soviet leader responded noncommittally. "Let the fruit grow ripe," he said, "and when it grows ripe, we shall eat it." ...
  • The Fame Game: Why Everyone's Gloating

    Whatever his financial future, Donald Trump is doomed to be a has-been. The die was cast not last week, but years ago, when he slipped the bounds of conventional notoriety and became a major star. Beyond the normal love-hate relationship Americans have always had with their celebrities (and without which a huge chunk of journalism couldn't exist), Trump is the victim of his own peculiar naivete about the way life works. Couldn't he (or anyone else?) see what all of his shameless self-promotion was setting him up for? Schadenfreude--a German word for glee over the misfortune of others--is actually as American as casino gambling. Famous as he is, Trump never understood the arc of fame. The boxing promoter never understood the point of that great boxing movie "The Harder They Fall". ...
  • Lessons For The Little Guy

    Face it, Donald Trump was right. If he hadn't borrowed all that money, he'd still be collecting rents in Queens. The rich don't get that way by saving pennies. They make their fortunes by finding suckers . . . er, bankers to give them loans. ...
  • Peri Picks

    Unfortunately, Spandex is still with us this summer. And shoulder-duster earrings have returned from the fashion graveyard. Short skirts are even shorter and a vaguely "Mod Squad"-style hippie look is favored among some college kids. Our ratings of some of the season's more interesting fashion items: [***] Long Shorts: Much better than short shorts. But the ones for guys are a bit fratty.[**] Sun Hats: Tans are out. Stay pale with these, but larger models can get out of hand.[****] Pucci Prints: Neon leggings are great. Leave the cat suits to Linda Evangelista.[**] Bras Only: If you want to be a Valkyrie, fine. Otherwise, it looks silly even on Madonna.
  • Tough Tactics By Ex-Troublemakers

    Call it poetic justice. Czechoslovakia's Communists used to round up opposition troublemakers before important national events. Now the troublemakers are in power, and last week, two days before the country's first free election in 44 years, police investigating corruption and "other criminal activities" pulled in half a dozen hard-line Communist leaders for questioning. They included former president Gustav Husak and party chief Milos Jakes. The next day, the government of Vaclav Havel accused the leader of another rival political party of being a secret-police informer, seriously damaging its chances on the eve of the all-important vote. ...
  • Trump: The Fall

    Once a symbol of cocky '80s wealth, Donald Trump is now tarnished by marital scandal, mired in debt and negotiating with banks to retain control of his empire. Even if he succeeds, the Trump "mystique' may never recover. ...
  • The Champion Of Passion

    D. H. Lawrence.By Jeffrey Meyers.446 pages. Knopf. $24.95.As the tide favoring censorship of the arts rises once more in this country, a new life of D. H. Lawrence takes on a certain poignancy. Lawrence was only 44 when tuberculosis felled him in 1930, but like James Joyce he's one of the great survivors of our century's frequent government-versus-art conflicts. In 1915 the British government, unprepared for candor about lesbianism and women's sexual desires, suppressed "The Rainbow." In 1929, the police closed down an exhibition of Lawrence's paintings, and from 1928 to 1960, customs officials on both sides of the Atlantic protected decent folk from "Lady Chatterley's Lover."It's hard to think of another modern novelist who preached loving life as incessantly as did this coal miner's son, yet he was constantly battered by it. Weak as a boy and often ill as a man, Lawrence was so dominated by his mother that during her life he could never love another woman. Later, feeling that...
  • Mandela Mania Grips America

    He will ride through the canyons of Manhattan in the biggest ticker-tape parade since the Mets won the '86 World Series. He will chat with President George Bush in the White House, lunch with the Kennedy clan in Boston and visit Martin Luther King Jr.'s tomb in Atlanta. By the time Nelson Mandela winds up his 12-day, eight-city tour of the United States, he will have mingled with Hollywood hotshots, spoken at $10-a-head rallies in Detroit and Oakland and attended a $5,000- to $25,000-a-plate dinner in New York City. He may or may not have met the poet in Boston who wants to read to him, the list of senators who want to be seen with him or the countless thousands across the country who just want to shake his hand. ...
  • Bring Your Own Guns

    San Francisco cops have long wanted to carry semiautomatic weapons so they could defend themselves against drug gangs that are often armed with Uzis and AK-47s. Last week they got the go-ahead to carry the weapons, but there is one hitch. The cops have to buy the semiautomatics with their own money because the police department can't afford them. The guns cost anywhere from $285 to $800 each. Still, most city cops said they would gladly fork it over themselves.
  • The Rusk Family War--And Peace

    The diplomat sits behind a professor's desk, an old man in a gray suit and maroon tie, working quietly under photographs of John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Baines Johnson. The trucker sits behind the wheel of an International tractor-trailer, a young man in a sweat-stained cap, T shirt and work pants, hauling cigarettes, candy and soda pop across the South. Both men are Rusks. Dean, the father, helped design and defend a conflict in Southeast Asia that killed 57,000 Americans and more than 1 million Vietnamese. Richard, the son, has spent the past 20 years brooding over how such a decent man could have ensnared himself in such a lousy war. Now they have collaborated on a fine exercise in reminiscence and self-redemption: As I Saw It (672pages. Norton. $29. 95), an honorable, no-apologies defense of Dean Rusk's career--and America's lost crusade in Vietnam. ...
  • Hey, Dad, Want To Play Slime World?

    The ultimate video-game battlefield may be the back seat of the family car. Handheld video games are already available from Nintendo and Atari. By Christmas NEC will introduce an even more sophisticated version that can double as a handheld television set. ...
  • Getting The Farmers To Kick The Habit

    W. D. Guthrie's grandfather smoked and chewed tobacco, mostly at the same time, for 90-some years before dying at 104. So Guthrie, a second-generation tobacco grower in Newport, N.C., doesn't buy the arguments against smoking. The evidence that does impress him is that tobacco pays. "There's a rule of thumb down here," Guthrie says. "For every 10 acres of corn you plant, you better plant one acre of tobacco to back it up." ...
  • Testing For Alzheimer's

    To doctors specializing in Alzheimer's disease, it was no surprise that Janet Adkins could still beat her son at tennis, yet could no longer play the piano. An Alzheimer's victim is like a city under prolonged artillery attack: the power plants may be failing, but the buses still run. Typically, the disease first affects memory and the ability to learn, then language skills and motor coordination. By the end--anywhere from three to 20 years after its onset--most patients are mute and uncomprehending. But there are many things they can still do before that vegetative state sets in. "These functions aren't lost at the same rate," explains Dr. David Bennett, clinical director of the Alzheimer's Disease Center at Chicago's Rush Presbyterian St. Luke's Medical Center. "We have some patients who are severely impaired, and yet they're still able to drive or play a good game of golf." ...
  • 'Archie Bunker With A Ph.D.'

    John Silber emerged from the sweaty trenches of the Springfield, Mass., Civic Center and the biggest moment of his neophyte political career. The state Democratic convention had given him 15.4 percent of its vote, just enough to put his name on September's primary ballot. Silber had spent the previous weeks lambasting media "smears" and denouncing the machinations of "insiders" who, he claimed, were trying to keep him out of the gubernatorial race. Now, as he headed for home, he paused to assess the rigors of Massachusetts politics. "All in all," he deadpanned, "I'd rather be in Philadelphia." ...
  • Buzzwords

    International bankers have developed their own vocabulary: Toxic Waste: Bonds that go beyond junk bonds, i.e., they're deadly.NlCs: A phonetic for newly industrialized countries. Usage: "Look out for the Pac-Rim (Pacific Rim) NICs."Clawback: An agreement in which a debtor country agrees to pay more interest if it gets a higher price for one of its commodities, such as oil. Usage: "We may get a clawback on that loan." Bradyize: The conversion of debt into a bond from the debtor country. Named for Treasury Secretary Nicholas Brady, a sometime advocate of this approach. A negative term since bankers often don't like to Bradyize.
  • Gorbachev: The Price Of Survival

    I have never encountered a Soviet delegation so tentative as the one that accompanied Gorbachev to Washington. Some of its members seemed nonplussed by the collapse of the Communist Party Others appeared torn between the familiar contours of central planning and the potential attractions of market economics. The head of the central planning agency lost command of his English when asked how his office was going to coordinate with the market sector, then did not seek to hide his irritation about this state of affairs. On the situation in Europe, they offered a series of complaints, fears and speculations. But these had a plaintive quality, as if they hoped America would rescue them from the consequences of their actions. ...
  • Out Of Bounds

    Prison inmate Anne Gates of Arabi, La., for trying to claim an inheritance from the husband she had been accused of killing with a fireplace poker. Gates was originally charged with murder in order to collect insurance, but later pleaded no contest to a reduced manslaughter charge. A Louisiana appeals court has ruled that Gates's plea could not be used as evidence that she is an "unworthy heir," so she may yet collect. Gates, by the way, is reportedly a suspect in the death of a previous husband.
  • Potholes Ahead On Tobacco Road

    Foreign visitors see the change most clearly--and take it hardest. Covering Mikhail Gorbachev's recent trip to San Francisco, an Italian journalist was so intimidated by the scorn of his neighbors I when he tried to light up that he left the pressroom in the middle of the Soviet chair- | man's speech to have a cigarette in his I hotel room. "This place is like a dictatorship of nonsmokers,' he grumbled to an I American colleague. 'I feel like a prison- | en" Most of the 49 million Americans who still smoke are similarly cowed these days, if a bit more resigned. When Shane Taylor found herself one of only three smokers in a Chicago office of 26. huddling in a hallway I without even a chair to smoke in, she decided to kick the habit. "Smoking just isn't condoned in our society," she said. "I've given up. I don't want to fight anymore." ...
  • Fighting The Greenhouse

    Of course you know what it will take to save the world from the greenhouse effect. To cut emissions of carbon dioxide--the gas released when coal, gas or oil burn and the one responsible for more than half of the impending global warming--you'll have to turn down the heater in winter and break out the long johns. In summer, don't even think of air conditioning. Chuck your 100-watt bulbs, screw in 40s. Trade in the dishwasher and clothes dryer for a dish drainer and laundry line. ...
  • Gremlins In The Halls Of Greed

    Gremlins 2 The New Batch is director Joe Dante's best film since . . . well, since "Gremlins." There's something about these madcap devil dolls that liberates Dante's infernal imagination. His satirical sensibility gets to run riot in this sequel. Abandoning the small-town setting of the original, Charlie Haas's sharp script--a happy mixture of sophistication and utter silliness--relocates the gremlins in the heart of corporate America: inside the sleek New York office tower of real estate and media mogul Daniel Clamp (John Glover), a megalomaniac billionaire who is one part Donald Trump, one part Ted Turner. (The loudspeakers in his building announce the showing on his cable network of "Casablanca," in a new colorized version with "a happier ending.") ...
  • A Plan For Europe

    At this meeting with so-called intellectuals in Washington, Gorbachev took me aside to say that a road map for the future was his most important concern. He was right. The upheavals of the past year make the creation of a new structure for European security essential. It must take into account the imminent unification of Germany as well as the de facto collapse of the Warsaw Pact. It has to define America's new relationship with Europe while granting the Soviet Union a serious role in Europe. ...
  • The Boys Are Back In Town

    Another 48 Hrs. is an atrocious movie, the embodiment of all the cynical commercialism that drives the summer season. Paramount skipped the usual reviewers' screenings in favor of one big all-media preview just before the film opened last week. This usually happens when a studio anticipates lousy reviews and wants to get a movie out fast to suck up the bucks the first weekend. Not that bad reviews are going to put one bump under the gravy train of this clear runaway smash. America has been waiting eight years for the sequel to "48 Hrs.," which made Eddie Murphy an instant box-office monster in his screen debut. ...
  • Glossy Home Companions

    When the French magazine Elle crashed onto these shores five years ago the reverberations were felt by everyone from the editors of mighty Vogue to fashion writers on local newspapers. The magazine was filled with unorthodox pairings of haute couture and street flash. Who else would put a humble T shirt under a $1,000 tunic? Elle's success spawned a legion of copiers. Vogue's current cover girl, for example, is adorned with a few artfully placed sea shells and not much else. ...
  • Iowa Factor

    Pro-choice candidates around the country are begging for help from the National Abortion Rights Action League these days. NARAL's support is largely credited for Iowa Democrat Don Avenson's win over popular Attorney General Tom Miller, an abortion foe, in last week's gubernatorial primary. "They're beating our doors down, where prior to [Iowa] we had to slip our support under the door," says NARAL president Kate Michelman. NARAL plans an all-out effort for incumbent Sen. Tom Harkin of Iowa and Gov. Jim Blanchard and Sen. Carl Levin of Michigan. But some Democratic leaders worry that NARAL's opposition to a parental-consent requirement for teenage abortions could be "too much of a good thing," particularly in Michigan, where there is a referendum on the issue.
  • Living A Life After John

    He was a lovable character," says Judith Jacklin Belushi of her husband, John, "but human, with his own struggles." While writing "Samurai Widow," the new book about her marriage and widowhood, she wasn't sure how to end it. Then she met writer-producer Victor Pisano. "I knew the book had ended when we got engaged," she says.
  • Kissing Couples

    If Alderman Robert Shaw has anything to say about it, Chicago bus riders will never see a proposed AIDS-awareness poster of kissing couples of different races and genders, under which is written: KISSING DOESN'T KILL: GREED AND INDIFFERENCE DO. The AIDS posters, designed by a group called Art Against AIDS and approved by the Chicago Transit Authority. are under fire from some city leaders--most notably, Shawl The alderman claims the posters represent a "camouflage" campaign to promote a certain lifestyle. A
  • Fund Drive

    So many people ignore the presidential campaign-fund checkoff on their IRS returns that it is projected to be $88 million in the red by the 1996 election. Only one in five taxpayers now checks the box earmarking $1 of his taxes for the fund--half the number of a decade ago. Former leaders of both parties are calling for a PR campaign on the fund's importance. Ronald Reagan has checked "No" on his tax returns; George Bush has checked "Yes."