News

More Articles

  • Murder America

    The United States is a gun-happy society that leads the industrialized world in homicides. Three fourths of all U.S. murders are committed with guns as compared with one fourth overseas. Here's the U.S. homicide rate compared with some selected countries: COUNTRY KILLINGS PER 100,000 MEN United States 21.9 Scotland 5.0 Israel 3.7 Sweden 2.3 France 1.4 Poland 1.2 England 1.2 West Germany 1.0 Japan 0.5 Austria 0.3
  • Is The Parretti Deal Dead?

    Giancarlo Parretti, the mysterious Italian financier, has hit a major snag in his attempt to buy the MGM/UA film studios. The flamboyant owner of Pathe Communications scored a major coup in April when Time Warner agredd to secure a $650 million bank loan--half the $1.3 billion purchase price--in return for rights to the United Artists and Pathe film libraries. But last Friday, Time Warner filed a $100 million lawsuit against Pathe, claiming Parretti had reneged on his end of the bargain. Parretti, the suit charged, exercised a "one-way option to decide which of its obligations it would honor [and] which Time Warner rights it could ignore." Sources at Pathe suggest the Time Warner deal is dead. Parretti's latest scheme: a stead of a takeover.
  • The Wealth Of A Nation

    There's a fairy-tale quality to West Germany's economic takeover of East Germany. The fable goes something like this: ...
  • Aftershocks In Teheran

    For survivors of the earthquake that killed nearly 40,000 people in Iran and the West European rescuers who flocked to help them, relief efforts sometimes became an exercise in mutual incomprehension. Burrowing through the rubble with their high-tech equipment, search teams were puzzled by the resignation of rural Persians, most of whom passionately mourned their martyred dead but quickly gave up hope of finding anyone buried alive. In Manjil, where 90 percent of all dwellings were leveled, a British team arrived at a house where a missing girl was said to be buried. They dug in with their bare hands. The child's uncle began his own search--for money. He rummaged through books, tossed aside a poster of the Ayatollah Khomeini, and finally extracted a case of papers and cash. When the British found his niece's body, the uncle simply asked if somebody else could dispose of her. ...
  • Singh For His Supper

    Who's sari now? Not Peter Singh, a Pakistani-born Elvis wannabe. When he's not running a carry-out food shop in Wales, Singh croons cross-cultural originals like "My Popadum Told Me," "Bhindi Bhaji Boogie" and "RockingWith the Sikh" to rapt Londoners. Singh got his inspiration from the King himself, who appeared to him in a dream and passed the mantle. Now, says Singh, "I don't smoke dope. I don't drink bourbon. All I want to do is shake my turban."
  • Fans, Start Your Engines

    Summer movies are nothing if not fun so let's have some fun with Days of Thun. den This is the one in which Tom Cruise plays a race-car driver on the NASCAR (stock car) circuit. So why is his name Cole Trickle? This is worth thinking about, especially since Cruise himself is credited with I the story, along with screenwriter Robert Towne. Why would a sex bomb like Cruise want to be called Trickle? Sounds more like an oil leak. His erstwhile rival and eventual buddy (played by Michael Rooker) is called Rowdy Burns--now there's the quintessential race driver's moniker. ...
  • A Princess For The People

    It was a joining of many kinds: old and new,elegant and simple, man and woman. When Prince Aya(second son of Emperor Akihito) and his college friend, a commoner, Kiko Kawashima, were married last week on the grounds of the Imperial Palace in Tokyo, the nation rejoiced. Here was a couple anyone could love. Princess Kiko and the newly named Prince Akishino will live in a modest home. They will continue their studies: she in social psychology, he in catfish. If there was any unhappiness at all, it was only Japanese sorrow that the heir to the throne, Crown Prince Naruhito, remains a bachelor.
  • Extra, Extra!

    The first independent U.S. Soviet newspaper hits the kiosks in Moscow this week. Called We/Mbl, it is a joint venture by the Hearst Corp. and Izvestia. A colorful mix of hard news, scandal, sports and comics, the first issue of the weekly has stories about a scheme to sell Soviet tnaks abroad for condoms and pantyhose, the AIDS epidemic in the U.S.S.R., (the lambada and X-rated video clubs) and the first U.S. soccer player to sign with a Soviet team. Hearst trained four Izvestia journalist in Western-style reporting and provided the paper and presses for the maiden issue.
  • The Family Vs. The State

    The Supreme Court has never been shy about confronting divisive social issues, even those affecting the most intimate human relations. But last week, as it concluded another term, the court came out with decisions that took it into uncharted terrain: the role of the family in making tragic life-and-death choices and government's ability to intrude in that personal realm. ...
  • Sununu The Illusionist

    Was White House chief of staff John Sununu really opposed to President Bush's backtrack on taxes last week? White House operatives put out the word Sununu was the "obstacle" that had to be overcome in persuading Bush to abandon his campaign pledge of "no new taxes." However, NEWSWEEK has learned Sununu was on board from early on. Democratic leaders who met with Bush at the White House Tuesday said Sununu "looked like he was kicked in the teeth" by Bush's decison. But administration insiders say Sununu was just posturing to create the illusion for I conservatives of support for | them at the White House. "Creating the appearance of disharmony . . . gives conservatives the sense of an inside champion," said a GOP operative. Still, some hard-liners are saying maybe Bush should face a '92 challenge. Possible candidates: columnist Patrick Buchanan or New Hampshire Sen. Gordon Humphrey.
  • Trump's Latest Deal: For Time

    Who says Donald Trump--he of 727 jets, 282-foot yachts and 118-room mansions--can't live frugally? Recently Trump and about 20 bankers, lawyers and consultants were in the midst of yet another long and tedious negotiating session when, according to a banker, Trump proposed they stop for something to eat. "I'll get some McDonald's," Trump said, yelling out an order for about 25 Big Macs, cheeseburgers, fries and sodas. Was Trump posturing for the benefit of his creditors? The banker didn't think so: "He seemed to know the menu." ...
  • What's On--And Beyond--The Sun

    Given the embarrassing failure of the Hubble Space Telescope, what is the future for other unmanned space probes? The answer, . surprisingly, is quite good, regardless of whether the American space-shuttle program recovers from its recurrent ills. As many as a dozen unmanned universe gazers may be launched by other rockets and other nations this decade, and the scientific harvest is likely to be rich.."The '80s were an extremely dead time for this work--almost no missions were launched," says David Morrison, chief of the Space Science Division at NASA's Ames Research Center. "But starting last year, we have a tremendous concentration of, launches and a wonderful time of excitement for astronomy." ...
  • Mandela's Discipline

    By sheer force of his personality Nelson Mandela accomplished the impossible in Washington. No, he didn't get the money for the African National Congress and he didn't get the commitment he wished for American sanctions to be sustained until such time as he and his political partners give the sign that it is OK to lift them. He did something much more difficult: he took charge of the conversation, blew away the conventional and somewhat nasty debate we were set to have about him and compelled political Washington to receive and comprehend him on his own terms. Unheard of. ...
  • Pulling Out The Peace Corps

    The parting was as controversial as it was poignant. Peace Corps volunteers recalled to Manila from remote provincial posts shut: fled into Malacanang Palace--some in sneakers, blue jeans and T shirts--for a tearful farewell with President Corazon Aquino. For nearly 30 years their predecessors had toiled in the Philippine countryside, bringing education and health services to the desperately poor. Last week American Ambassador Nicholas Platt sent the 260 volunteers home. or off' to other countries. Communist guerrillas with the New People's Army were "moving toward more and more terrorism," said a senior U.S. official, and the volunteers were in danger. The embassy subsequently announced that Peace Corps volunteer Timothy Swanson had been kidnapped on the island of Negros. Ten Amerians have been killed in NPA attacks since 1987; the rebels have threatened many others in a campaign to ush America to withdraw its 40,000 troops from Clark Air Base and Subic Bay Naval Station. ...
  • Band-Aid Wars: Adding Extensions To Injury

    It's war. And the battlefield is your kid's boo-boo. The leaders of the adhesive-bandage industry are using line extensions to cut into one another's hottest market: tiny consumers. Johnson & Johnson launched a new look: Band-Aids bearing the visages of Cookie Monster and Big Bird. Curad owners Ken-: dall-Futuro introduced Happy Strips, a tyke-size line of bandages printed with McDonald's characters. A smaller company, DuCair Bioessence of North Bergen, N.J., features a line of picture bandages that includes the Muppets, Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles, the Care Bears and even G.I. Joe. ...
  • A New 'Partnership' For Latin America

    With the S&L crisis growing by the day, a lot of people have all but forgotten another long-simmering financial mess: Latin American debt. Not George Bush. Last week he unveiled a broad package of trade, investment and debt proposals to aid Latin America. ...
  • A Third Party?

    Despite opposition from some local chapters, the National Organization for Women is exploring the formation of a third-party coalition of feminists, environmentalists and social-justice activists. A 40 member commission including former GOP Rep. John Anderson of Illinois--a third-party presidential candidate in 1980--former U.S. attorney general Ramsey Clark and ex-California Supreme Court chief justice Rose Bird will hold hearings around the country after this fall's elections and make recommendations to NOW next year. "Some people think we're crazy," says NOW president Molly Yard. "Others love the idea."
  • A Truce In The Trade War

    Will the real U.S.-Japanese trade talks please stand up? When the so called Structural Impediments Initiative (SII) talks started 10 months ago, they were billed as the most important set of bilateral negotiations that Washington and Tokyo had held since 1960. Next they were touted as an absolute disaster that threatened the most serious schism of the postwar era. Eventually they became a quaint, politically irrelevant intellectual exercise more appropriate for a collegiate debating club than the world's two leading economic powers. ...
  • A New Germany

    By merging their economies last weekend, East and West have created one Deutsche mark, one nation--and a new balance of power in Europe ...
  • Hot Couples

    Virginia Gov. L. Douglas Wilder and former nude model-turned-socialite Pat Kluge. Wilder says he and Kluge are just "friends." But Kluge, separated from her billionaire husband, John Kluge, and Wilder, who is divorced, have reportedly weekended together on Nantucket, on Maryland's Eastern Shore and at Virginia Beach. Wilder earlier this year named Kluge, a high-school dropout, to the University of Virginia's Board of Visitors. The Kluges, who now live in separate houses on the same estate, were Wilder's chief campaign contributors.
  • Wisconsin Is Talking...

    About fallen dairy princess Lori Esker, convicted in the "moomoo murder" of killing the fiancee of her former boyfriend. The 20-year-old Esker, Marathon County's reigning dairy princess until her arrest last September, was found guilty of using a belt to strangle Lisa Cihaski, 21, in the parking lot of a Howard Johnson Motor Lodge. Trial testimony disclosed Esker killed Cihaski to prevent her from marrying dairy farmer Bill Buss, 26. The murder has embarrassed state dairymen. "It's unfortunate the industry gets a black eye in the situation," said Dan Borschke, president of the Wisconsin Dairy Council.
  • Acting Frisky At Comiskey

    The Chicago Cubs used to be the team of the trendy. Celebrities, an ex-president included, did play by play. Bryant Gumbel and George Will were avid fans. Even the ballpark was perfect: with its ivy-draped brick, it had a certain collegiate panache. But no longer. The hot ticket in Chicago this season isn't the fifth-place Cubs, it's the White--hot Sox. That's right, the White Sox--the humble team from the South Side, the team that once took the field in shorts, for God's sake--last week grabbed the lead in the American League West. ...
  • Hello, Hello! Are You There?

    More chilling news for air travelers. The National Air Traffic Controllers Association claims safety has been jeopardized in the airspace managed by a regional control center west of Chicago. During the past year, the group says, there have been more than 500 communications glitches between controllers and pilots, including several instances of total radio failure. The Federal Aviation Administration agrees there have been problems but insists communications are safe.
  • Waiter! Get Me A Picture Phone And A Fax!

    It looks like the setting for a power lunch. But inside Electronic Cafe International in Santa Monica, Calif., you can get a lot more than a cup of espresso and a piece of quiche. How about a fax from India, or a teleconference call from London? Located in Santa Monica's 18th Street Arts Complex, Cafe International is more than an eatery; it's the latest wrinkle in global communications facilities. ...
  • Good Appetite

    Republican Chairman Lee Atwater's style may have mellowed since he was found to have a brain tumor in March, but he hasn't lost his political appetite. He went for a drive last week with GOP honchos Ed Rollins and Lyn Nofziger and discussed the gubernatorial races in California, Texas, Illinois, Ohio and Florida. Doctors say the tumor hasn't grown, but he's not out of danger. Atwater walks with a cane and spends up to seven hours a day in physical therapy.
  • The 'Quark Barrel' Politics Of The Ssc

    It won't cure cancer or improve the nation's defenses, but science's latest megaproject enjoys the kind of support in Congress usually reserved for tax cuts. It's not that lawmakers are so impressed that the proposed atom smasher (which would be the most powerful on earth) promises to solve such profound mysteries as where the elementary blocks i of matter called quarks come from. No, to understand why the House of Representatives last week voted $318 million for the machine that will perform these wonders, and why Congress may write checks for much of the rest of the $8 billion it will cost, forget the profound mysteries. Consider a map drawn up by the Department of Energy (DOE). Thirty-nine states have a university, firm or lab with a piece of the Superconducting Supercollider (SSC) pie. It's known as quark-barrel politics. ...
  • Death Bias?

    Is sexism playing a life-or-death role for terminally ill patients? Yes, according to a study to be released this week by the journal of the American Society of Law and Medicine. The study concludes that American courts usually reject turning off life-support systems for female patients because women are considered more emotional, immature and in need of protection than men. In six out of eight cases involving men, the study says, appellate courts followed the euthanasia preferences of the patient. But only two out of 14 court rulings involving women followed the same guideline. "Dying," complains study coauthor Dr. Steve Miles, "is not a gendered activity."
  • The Successful Annoyer

    A Tory M.P. says of Thatcher, 'She cannot see an institution without hitting it with her handbag' ...
  • A White-Male Lament

    You know us. We're everywhere and we drive you crazy. We turn up where you work, at parties and next to you in airplanes. We're the ones who debate the merits of leaf blowers, comparison shop for car polishes and file every warranty for every purchase. We're the ones who can't clap to the beat, who wear awkward smiles, the kind of guys you hope won't try to start a conversation. We're BMCWM--boring, middle-class white men. How did so many of us wind up so boring Well, we didn't ask to be this way. Being boring is a role thrust upon us. ...
  • The Nixons Go For The Gold

    Richard and Pat Nixon met in 1938, when both landed parts in an amateur production of George S. Kaufman's "The Dark Tower." Watergate reporters Woodward and Bernstein later wrote that the Nixons had a loveless marriage. Maybe so, but last week they celebrated their 50th anniversary. It was a quiet family affair, the only social splash was made by the Nixon grandkids in the swimming pool.
  • It's Time For Summer Reruns

    This is the time for golf, C-Span and mowing the lawn. Indeed, summer programming can be such a reach that NBC is rerunning the quite good but failed 1983 Cybill Shepherd vehicle "The Yellow Rose." Here, then, is a guide to selecting which reruns to watch from the year's best shows (and remember, there's always baseball on bad nights):
  • No Common Ground

    Abortion: The Clash of Absolutes. By Laurence H. Tribe. 270pages. Norton. $19.95. ...
  • A Quick Look At The History Of Smut

    When not busy at the Constitutional Convention, Founding Father Ben Franklin pens essays on choosing a mistress (find older women) and combating flatulence (drink perfume, avoid onions). Pretty raunchy stuff. But the new nation values tolerance: it adopts the First Amendment in 1791.A new "family" edition of Shakespeare is published by Thomas Bowdler. It expurgates the racy stuff. A new verb enters the lexicon: "to bowdlerize," to remove what cannot with propriety be read aloud in a family. Big seller in the United States.Anthony Comstock, a New York grocer and religious fanatic, spurs laws banning obscene literature from the mails. He "exposes" such offending writers as Voltaire. "Comstockery" (as George Bernard Shaw called it) is born. In 1882, Walt Whitman's "Leaves of Grass" is banned in Boston. Years later, Comstock wins appointment to President Woodrow Wilson's International Purity Congress.Two classics are declared obscene by Massachusetts courts: Theodore Dreiser's "An...
  • Heavy Coverage In Colombia

    Colombian officials warn that they may stop backing the U.S. war on drugs if Washington Mayor Marion Barry gets off lightly on cocaine-related charges. "The United States has decided to wage war until not one Colombian is standing, but is unwilling to make any real sacrifices," says a top government adviser. Barry's Washington trial is often front-page news in Colombia. It is seen there as a test of U.S. commitment to curb demand by getting tough on users at home. If high-profile U.S. drug consumers go unpunished, officials say, it will be difficult to convince Colombians their war on the cartels is worth continued bloodshed.
  • In Her Own Image: Marilyn Quayle's New Appeal

    It seemed like a bad joke. Marilyn Quayle selected federal disaster relief as her first cause while all around her disasters were constantly occurring. Her beleaguered husband remained a target of ridicule despite his efforts to prove himself as vice president. Her children were struggling to adjust to life in the Washington fishbowl. Even her desire to return to her law career--or fill the seat Dan Quayle had vacated in the Senate--prompted public criticism and private frustration. At somber lunches with friends, tears welled up as she recounted the travails of her new life. ...
  • Fixing The 'Between'

    When it first appeared three decades ago, the field of family therapy was considered revolutionary for its view of the family as as "system" in which members collide with one another in predictable ways. Today family theraphy is undergoing a small revolution of its own. Spurred by feminists in its midst, the profession is being forced to re-examined its persistent sexual stereotyping of family members--a tendency all the more curious in a brand of theraphy that all places heavy emphasis on gender roles. One of the more familiar, and problematic, family constellations, for instance, is the so-called persuader-distancer couple, consisting of an "over-involved" mother and an "unavailable' father who between them, stir up a witch's brew offamily tensions. Such concepts have come under attack by feminist who believe that a mother's expressive way are somehow being turned into a liability by therapist. ...
  • Keeping The Pressure On President Bush

    Keep the pressure on," chanted the adoring throngs after Nelson Mandela stepped off a jetliner in New York last week and invoked the main theme of his six-week, 14-nation tour. The demand raised questions all but forgotten since the emotional sanctions debate of 1986: how much pressure, and for how long The South African government was hoping for a reward for its relaxation of political repression, including Mandela's release. Pretoria may soon meet the legal test that would enable President Bush to begin lifting U.S. economic sanctions, the most stringent imposed by any of South Africa's major trading partners. But Mandela insists sanctions should stay "until fundamental and irreversible changes take place"--and that will take years, at best. "[South African President F. W.] de Klerk has done nothing," Mandela said. "What are you rewarding him for?" ...
  • Good News In The Drug War

    Narcotics agents in Orange County, Calif, have been getting unexpected results lately when they field-test the purity of seized cocaine: instead of the deep royal-blue indicating high-grade powder, the cops are more often seeing a pale shade, showing that the drug has been heavily "stepped on," or diluted. In New York City, undercover narcs who six months ago paid $24,000 for a kilo of coke in buy-and-bust operations are now having to pay as much as $35,000. Since January, the wholesale price of cocaine has skyrocketed in New York, Houston, Chicago and Los Angeles--where, over the same period, the typical size of a $20 rock of crack has shrunk by one fourth. Prices up, purity down: it's a classic sign that supplies are low. ...
  • Congress: The Flag Boosters Get Burned

    George Bush and the GOP's congressional leadership had hoped to fete the Fourth of July with the first step toward a new-and-improved Bill of Rights. But last week the House of Representatives rained on their parade, defeating a proposed constitutional amendment to ban desecration of the American flag. For several days, congressmen debated the issue with a mix of passion and parody. While Illinois Rep. Henry J. Hyde invoked people who "paid for [the flag] with their blood," Rep. Gary L. Ackerman of New York displayed items with a flag motif, including panty hose and garbage bags. "How about American flag napkins?" said Ackerman. "What if you blow your nose in one? Have you broken the law?" ...
  • The Importance Of Being Nasty

    Luther Campbell's month so far: his group's record "As Nasty as They Wanna Be" became the first ever ruled obscene in federal court and he was arrested after a show. Hundreds of stores have pulled the album. The silver lining thousands of stores haven't it's sold almost 2 million copies. As Campbell said when Broward County, Fla., cops led him away, "That's life in America." ...
  • Historic Boat:

    For only $1,225,000, collectors of political memorabilia can purchase Monkey Business, the yacht that was the redoubt of Gary Hart and Donna Rice. Florida yacht broker Bob Offer explained there wasn't much charter business for the boat after the Hart affair. Many wives, he said, would not allow their husbands on the yacht. The boat was advertised in the classified section of The Wall Street Journal as a craft "whose charms are irresistible. "
  • 'Taking Out The Cancer'

    Lookouts whistle in warning when the unmarked police car enters an apartment block in the fetid Panama City slum of Curundu. Two Panamanian cops emerge, sweating and anxious. The apartments above them bristle with grenades and machine guns. On an earlier patrol, someone threw a body from an upper-story window--perhaps as a warning. "This is the most dangerous area we have," says Sgt. Javier Batista, scanning the rooftops while holding a pump-action 12-gauge. "If someone starts firing from up here, a shotgun won't reach them." As the Panama Defense Forces under Gen. Manuel Antonio Noriega, they always entered the area well armed. Now demoted to civilian police by their American occupiers, they carry only shotguns and sidearms. The U.S. servicemen who accompany them appear unsympathetic. American military adviser Joseph Guilmette says he draws his gun "on a daily basis" in the barrios. "We get shot at. It's no big deal. It's part of the job." ...
  • A Trove

    United States investigators are poring through a trove of sensitive bank records, captured during the invasion Panama, that could help crack the financial networks of the drug cartels and other criminal organization. Under Manuel Panama Panama was a world-laundering center. Analyst have already traced $1 billion from U.S. drug sales to 683 cartel accounts in 37 Panamanian banks. They now hope to match names in the Panamanian accounts with numbered electronic money transfers that have been monitored by the National Security Agency since the mid-1980s. The Treasury Department has set up a new interagency intelligence unit called FINCEN to direct the investigation.
  • If It Only Had A Heart

    If you thought Old Detroit was going to the dogs in "RoboCop," wait till you see what horrors lurk in RoboCop 2. Crime is rampant in the streets, the city has gone bankrupt, the police are on strike and half the population seems to be strung out on a deadly new drug called Nuke. All of this looks like good news to Omni Consumer Products (OCP), the heartless corporation that runs the police department and, as it turns out, wants to foreclose on the city itself. "We're taking Detroit private!" OCP announces with greedy glee, smelling profit in urban chaos. ...
  • The Right Wing's Cultural Warrior

    When Sen. Jesse Helms invites you to see his etchings, he's not kidding. As Capitol Hill's point man against obscenity, he keeps a small stash of Robert Mapplethorpe's homoerotic photographs in his office. He often makes viewing them a condition for news interviews. When a television station refused his request that they air the pictures, Helms had made his point. If showing Mapplethorpe's work on television could cost a broadcaster his license, he argued, why should the NEA get a free ride? Helms insists he is not a prude or a censor. He just doesn't want the NEA spending tax money to offend God-fearing Americans. "If America persists in the way it's going, and the Lord doesn't strike us down," he says, "he ought to apologize to Sodom and Gomorrah." ...
  • Can This Marriage Be Saved?

    Quebec was preparing for the feast of the shepherd Jean Baptiste, the province's patron saint. For the first time since 1969, when separatist violence marred the celebration, a parade was scheduled; children would ride through the streets of Montreal in a float shaped like a lamb three stories high. Last week the lamb stood outside the fold. Prime Minister Brian Mulroney pronounced dead his six-year campaign to resolve a long-running constitutional crisis by reconciling French Quebec with English Canada. "Just because the sheep is an animal that has a reputation for following, we don't want to be ashamed of it," said Robert Gariepy, a volunteer organizer in Montreal. "We want to be proud of and show the positive direction we're taking with our country." ...
  • Big Gains

    Seventeen percent of the 7,461 state legislators in the United States are women, up from 12 percent in 1981. But among the states, the difference in women's representation is vast: States with highest percentage of state legislators who are women: New Hampshire 32.1% Maine 30.7 % Vermont 30.6 % Arizona 30.0 % Colorado 28.6 % States with lowest percentage of state legislators who are women: Louisiana 2.1 % Kentucky 5.1 % Alabama 5.7 % Mississippi 5.8 % Pennsylvania 6.7 % SOURCE: FUND FOR THE FEMINIST MAJORITY
  • Enduring A 'Test Of God'

    A massive earthquake thunders through northern Iran, killing thousands of people and challenging Rafsanjani's hard-pressed regimeIt was after midnight, and like most Iranians, the inhabitants of Gilan and Zanjan provinces were in bed or watching World Cup soccer on television. Then their homes collapsed on top of them. In barely a minute, a huge earthquake flattened more than 100 villages, towns and cities, cutting many of them off from outside help and leaving them vulnerable to the aftershocks that rolled through the hills like thunder. The quake devastated a rich agricultural area in the north of Iran along the Caspian Sea. Iran's new spiritual leader, Ayatollah Ali Khamenei, called it a "test of God." But the disaster soon became a more mundane test of the Iranian government's ability--after more than a decade of revolution, war and zealous isolation--to work with the outside world to meet the demands of a heartbreaking human crisis.By the end of last week, the dead were...
  • From 'Donald Ducks' To 'Trump: The Joke'

    It was getting to be like the Perils of Pauline. Would Donald Trump get a reprieve with a last-minute loan package? Would he show up headlines like DONALD DUCKS by making debt payments befora Tuesday's deadline? And lurking over those questions was an even bigger one: was the renowned dealmaker in danger of becoming: Trump: TheJoke? ...
  • Found: Man's Newest Furry Cousin

    Biologists can be an existential bunch: to them, no species exists until a scientist describes it. For centuries the coastal fishermen of the Brazilian barrier island Superaqui took for granted the caras pretas, or black-faced monkeys, playing on their roofs and gamboling in the seaside brush. Last year zoologist Dante Martins Teixeira of the National Museum in Rio de Janeiro met a Superaqui native who told him about the squirrel-size monkeys who had golden manes like lions and black tails, forearms and faces. Two of Martins's colleagues from Brazil's Capao da Imbuia Natural History Museum spent a month on the island observing the monkeys in the wild. The creatures were too cunning and fast for the camera, but the biologists did bring back a preserved skin given to them by a fisherman. After close scrutiny, the Brazilians announced last week that they had "discovered" a new primate species, Leontopithecus caissara, or black-faced lion tamarin. If they're right, the creature is a...
  • Hailing A Hero--And Looking For Our Own

    Everywhere Nelson Mandela went in New York last week, black folks brought their kids. Parents led them through the downtown crowds to watch the ticker-tape parade; they carried them on their shoulders during the tour of Harlem; they kept them up until almost midnight at the rally in Yankee Stadium. Thousands saw it as a once-in-a-lifetime chance to expose children to someone they could hold up as a true black hero. The images were moving--but they pointed up a conspicuous irony. Many African-Americans now seem to feel far more passionately about Mandela than they do about any black leaders here in this country. ...
  • Eco-Activist Summer

    With few noisy clashes and a crowd of about 500, it was something less than the dramatic curtain raiser many had expected. But last week's antilogging demonstration at Louisiana-Pacific's Samoa mill, just west of Eureka, Calif. at least laid down the lines for "Redwood Summer"--a season of civil disobedience just beginning in the timber country of northern California. On one side of the road leading into the mill, supporters of the radical environmental group Earth First. "There's no time left to try to work through legal measures," demonstrator Chris Robinson said. "You also have to get out and do some grass-roots activism." On the other side, working people whose livelihoods depend on the logging business. Secretary Kim Lennon-Bailey clocked out of the Louisiana-Pacific mill around lunchtime, picked up a picket sign reading MY KIDS ARE MY FUTURE and joined the pro-logging, antiprotester contingent. "I believe in my job and I believe in this area," she said. ...
  • Hackers Of The World, Unite!

    As the Feds widen their crackdown on computer tampering, some pioneers of the industry have joined to defend freedom of the keyboard ...
  • We Have Met The Enemy

    When Mick Jagger sang (in "Sympathy for the Devil") that "every cop is a criminal," he was being arty. But the hero cops in three new true crime books might admit he had a point--though not because they buy this stuff about the yinyangness of it all. Cops and criminals each need to know how the other thinks. And since both crime families and police recruit mainly from the working class, they share a common language and culture. "Let's get drunk," N.Y.P.D. detective Vincent Murano tells a prospective informant in his book Cop Hunter (320 pages Simon and Schuster. $19.95) "Let's get some pizza and have a lot of beers and relax and talk about this thing. I don't particularly like those people up there. I certainly don't like the D.A. from Brooklyn. I think he's got a hard-on for you." These intimate enemies trust each other to play by the rules. (Neither side, for instance, may conduct summary executions against the other.) When someone violates that tacit trust, business as usual is...