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  • Keeping A Deadly Secret

    In the '50s and '60s, at the height of the cold war, Raymond Joe mined uranium to help meet the demands of the booming nuclear-weapons industry. For a total of 15 years the Navajo worked in the mines throughout the Southwest, at the outset earning as little as 90 cents an hour. Two years ago Joe was diagnosed with lung cancer, a victim, he believes, of the radiation in unventilated mine shafts. Doctors removed part of his right lung, but the cancer has recurred. At least 450 former uranium miners have already died of lung cancer, five times the expected average. And, as the miners and their families allege, for nearly 20 years the U.S. government knew the danger--and suppressed it. Says Joe, 57, who now lives in Shiprock, N.M., "We were never told that the work we did could affect our health." ...
  • Bad Manners In Minnesota

    Mikhail Gorbachev's visit to Minnesota after the summit was supposed to be a PR coup that would give Gov. Rudy Perpich a much-needed lift in the polls. Instead, what the visit raised was eyebrows. U.S. protocol chief Joseph Reed was quoted as saying the Democratic governor "behaved very badly" by failing to invite the state's two Republican senators to the lunch he gave for the Soviet president at his mansion. (Reed later said he had merely called Perpich's behavior "regrettable.") Sens. Rudy Boschwitz and David Durenberger had to eat with the B list in the St. Paul College Club. "They showed up at the mansion and were turned away," said Reed. Perpich did manage to find room for his daughter and son, as well as for a florist and his wife. ...
  • Yo, Adrian! Is This Art?

    So there he stood, frozen in time, looking down over his city like a bronzed colossus. Clothed in his boxer's garb, his arms forever upstretched in jubilation and triumph, Rocky Balboa had laid claim to the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art once again. And the City of Brotherly Love--the scene of his triumph, the birthplace of the Rocky saga, the epitome of serenity and boredom--is a city at war with itself. ...
  • Nintendo And Beyond

    With flashy graphics, dazzling sound and ever-zippier software, the leader in video games--and its two chief rivals, NEC and Sega--looks to the future ...
  • Here's Looking At You, Kid

    Take an early look at the Vikings'2010 draft pick, Marcus (Heads Up) Gastineau. The 5month-old son of Mark Gastineau, late of the New York Jets, lives with his mother, Brigitte Nielsen. The great Dane says, "He's a very big boy, very strong, but Iwon't guide him in one direction. I can't say he'll be a football player. He may be a computer scientist." And if Marcus needs a lullaby, Mom can just croon her just recorded single, "Rough and I Ready for Love."
  • Germany: Unanswered Questions

    The great mistake of the statesmen at Versailles in 1919 had been to reconstitute Germany as a national entity, to give no wider horizon than the national one to the aspirations of the German people," wrote the statesman George F. Kennan in his memoirs. "Now we were faced with this problem once again." He was speaking of 1949, but the words have lost no power. George Bush and Mikhail Gorbachev met last week in hopes of locating some wider horizon for the reunification of Germany. Would it be NATO, as the West would like? Or the shapeless 35-nation Helsinki-accords cluster known as the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE)? For the moment, both Bush and Gorbachev were frustrated. "The Soviets can't stop Germany from uniting and the united Germany will be in NATO," said a senior U.S. official "But without the Soviets' blessing, unification could come to a messy ... conclusion, with elements of real danger." ...
  • Burma: No Win For Ne Win

    For the last 10 months, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi has languished in internal exile beside a Burmese lake, reading books on the lawn of her whitewashed villa as government soldiers glare at her from a few yards away. But Suu Kyi, the 44-year old daughter of a Burmese independence hero, has suddenly re-emerged as her country's most important opposition politician. Last week her National League for Democracy (NLD) swept to a surprise victory in military-run parliamentary elections-making remote Burma the latest, and in some ways most unlikely, country to demand democracy. ...
  • Gorb's Fear Of Choppers

    Mikhail Gorbachev agreed to waive a longstanding Soviet security phobia against helicopters last week when he lifted off from the White House lawn for the summit meeting at Camp David. But Gorby agreed to the chopper ride only after a curious condition was met: he insisted that he accompany his host, President Bush, on Marine One. The Secret Service and Soviet security officials balked at the prospect of the two superpower leaders aloft in the same aircraft. (For security reasons, Bush and Vice President Dan Quayle never fly together.) But Bush, eager to be the gracious host and tour guide, overruled the objections. The two men whisked away together to the presidential hideaway. Barbara Bush and Raisa Gorbacheva followed on a separate chopper. ...
  • Was It Illness Or Immorality?

    From the time he admitted making a series of obscene phone calls last March to the home of a Virginia police officer and his wife, former American University president Richard Berendzen has been at the center of an intriguing psychiatric debate. Berendzen resigned his presidency and underwent intensive therapy at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, which helped him win a suspended sentence from the court. But some commentators felt he had been let off the moral hook too easily. Not least of the doubters was Susan Allen, the object of most of the bizarre phone calls. Appearing on ABC's "Nightline," she listened stonily as Berendzen and Dr. Paul McHugh, chief psychiatrist at Johns Hopkins Medical School, told how he recalled being sexually abused as a child--a memory "triggered" at the funeral of his father, who died in the very room where the abuse occurred. That, Allen snorted, was no excuse. Berendzen may well have been sick, but he should have controlled himself. "Each time they [obscene...
  • The Itch And The Scratch

    They're ba-ack . . . Tick season is upon us again, and Ixodes dammini, the tiny species that unleashes the ravages of Lyme disease, is on the march--out of the woods, up over your socks and right onto your bare calves. The bugs are back and so are the anxious patients, inundating doctors' waiting rooms with symptoms that range from inflamed hair follicles to unexplained fatigue. Sometimes, a quick inspection and a brief chat are all the physician needs to determine that the affliction is not Lyme. If it is, however, the diagnosis is often a lengthy quest, yielding equivocal results. But people who are bugged want clear answers and fast fixes; that itch has opened the way to fast bucks and some sloppy medicine. "You know America. I know America," says Dr. David Harris, health commissioner for Suffolk County, N.Y., one of the peak areas of Lyme incidence. "Some people do use exaggerated fears to sell products." ...
  • Back In Boston

    At a Kennedy Library fundraiser last week, Jacqueline Onassis showed up with her longtime companion, investment wizard Maurice Tempelsman. Earlier in the day, sans Maurice, she applauded warmly as her daughter. Caroline, unveiled a statute of John F. Kennedy outside the Massachusetts State House. Jackie was speechless, but Sen. Edward Kennedy quipped, "I can tell from Jack's expression that he is already feeling uncomfortable on his pedestal."
  • In China, Disappearing Dissidents

    The terse, scribbled note delivered to Hou Dejian's Beijing apartment said a great deal about the government's ruthless war on dissent. The previously announced news conference was canceled, Hou's note said, on account of "personal business." Beijing's most outspoken remaining dissident had vanished. So had the Taiwan-born pop singer's associates, university teacher Gao Xin and computer-company executive Zhou Duo. A year ago Hou, Gao and Zhou joined university lecturer Liu Xiabo in a hunger strike in Tiananmen Square. Two days later the government launched its crackdown. ...
  • Time To Wind Down The Party

    Mikhail Gorbachev travels well. But at home he plays to a half-full house. Last week's election of Boris Yeltsin as chairman of the Russian Republic's parliament was a sign of discontent over the pace of reform. While East European governments are actually grappling their way from the plan to the market, Soviet reformers still mark time. At the core of the problem is the inherent weakness of the government--in contrast to its counterparts in Poland, Czechoslovakia or Hungary. ...
  • A Season Of Sleaze In Tv News

    Tappy Phillips, ace reporter for New York's local "Eyewitness News," was hot in pursuit of a major homicide case. As the camera zoomed in on a New | York City detective, she grilled him about the stabbing death of a teenage girl found lifeless on a beach. Another preppy murder? A case of "wilding" redux? Not quite. The victim was Laura Palmer, the fictitious corpse of ABC's cult favorite "Twin Peaks." After 90 seconds of air time, the sleuth rendered his verdict: the killer had to be the father of Laura's boyfriend Bobby Briggs. ...
  • The Salaryman As Abe Lincoln

    James R. Schueler, chief executive, wonders why so many Americans complain about not being able to sell in the Japanese market. What's all the fuss about having to set up shop in Japan to succeed, about being willing to take losses if need be? Take losses? Schueler sits in his office in Hamilton, Mont., and takes orders. He says he gets "several calls a month" from overseas customers wanting what his company's got--a product that retails at about $100,000 a pop. His exports to Japan have more than doubled in five years. Over the next five years, he predicts, his sales to the Far East will go from 5 percent of his overall business to 25 percent. ...
  • The Venetian Carnival

    Jenny Holzer, the 4-year-old American "word artist," is the official sensation of this year's gathering of art-world tribes, the 44th Venice Biennale (through Sept. 30). Her spectacular display of deadpan "Truisms," blazing across rows of LED (light-emitting diode) signs, and her Roman-letter "Laments," carved into marble floors and benches, was awarded the grand prize for the best national pavilion. The unofficial rude-boy-in-church prize went to Jeff Koons, who displayed his work in the "Aperto"--or open--section for young artists, held farther down the canal in the cavernous old rope factory, the Corderie dell'Arsenale. Koons, who likes to tweak the nose of the art world, collaborated with Cicciolina, the former porn actress who's a member of the Italian Parliament. They posed naked for three big, soft-core photos and one unbearably unerotic sculpture. ...
  • Off-Base Air Base?

    Pentagon officials call it "a military base for the 21st century." This summer, if the Defense Department has its way, bulldozers will plow up olive groves and pastures near the southern Italian town of Crotone. The project: a brand-new $741 million Air Force base replete with "Mediterranean motif" buildings, a shopping mall and hotel. But the Crotone plan may end up as just another remnant of the cold war rendered obsolete by the Soviet retreat in Eastern Europe. Even before perestroika, the project had its detractors--some NATO officials jokingly refer to it as a "theme park." Says Democratic Rep. Patricia Schroeder: "Now that peace has broken out, it's a real waste of money." ...
  • A Raging Bull In A Briar Patch

    Housing and retail sales are "falling. Unemployment is edging upward. And last week the government's index of leading indicators took a dive along with new factory orders. Yet the stock market responded to the economic warning signals by staging another big rally. Investors pushed the Dow Jones industrial average to 2900.97, the third weekly record in a row and a 9 percent gain since April. ...
  • A Head, Or Two, Of Their Times

    Millionaire Eddie Murphy is worth only about 75 cents in Tanzania-if you're talking postage stamps. The superstar comic, along with the late Sammy Davis Jr., Gladys Knight (Pipless), Stevie Wonder, Smokey Robinson and three African-born performers, is part of a new series celebrating the achievements of black entertainers. Michael Jackson and Bill Cosby appear on two high-denomination souvenir sheets (350 shillings apiece). The Cos on your electric bill? Murphy staring up from a mash note? Now that's special delivery.
  • A Real Kongfrontation

    The city of Orlando is too hot, it's too far from the beach--and it's the No. 1 tourist destination in the world. Rides are the reason. Anyone who minimizes the impact of Space Mountain or Journey into Imagination upon the area need only consider the Orlando airport. Before Walt Disney World opened in 1971, it handled 900,000 travelers annually; with the Magic Kingdom now joined by Epcot Center and the Disney MGM Studios Theme Park, 17 million pass through each year. Obviously, ordinary amusement-park rides could never bring on such a boom. This is the age of the "themed attraction," which provides a little narrative with your nausea. Disney's Star Tours, Body Wars, The Great Movie Ride--these are tunnels of love with plot twists, the Tilta-Whirl as modern American novel. But now the company has something it never really had in Florida before, and perhaps never expected: competition. Universal Studios has opened an "entertainment themed attraction." In English, that means rides and...
  • Behind The Boasting

    Mikhail Gorbachev needed a victory--and the Bush administration was determined he should have one. In a ceremonial flurry last week, Gorbachev and George Bush approved a series of agreements designed to make the Soviet leader look like a winner in arms control. They pointed to progress on the eight-year quest for a treaty reducing the two sides' strategic nuclear arsenals. They signed an agreement to destroy huge stockpiles of chemical weapons. And in business left over from the days of Brezhnev and Ford, they wrapped up details for on-site inspection of nuclear testing. Altogether, proclaimed Secretary of State James Baker, the accords helped move the superpowers from the "balance of terror" to "the steadier ground of balance of interests." But the movement was less than met the eye. ...
  • Secondhand Smoke: Some Grim News

    There's no denying that cigarettes are a lethal addiction: smoking kills more than six times as many Americans every year as died in the entire Vietnam War. But secondhand smoke remains a source of bitter contention. Is it really a public health hazard, as the antismoking forces contend? Or is it just an annoyance? Four years ago, the U.S. Surgeon General's office and the National Research Council tackled the question. In separate reports, both firmly linked passive smoking to lung cancer. They also found that smokers' children suffered more than their share of respiratory infections. But neither panel tried to gauge the overall impact of passive smoking on the nation's health. The evidence was still too sketchy. ...
  • Cleaning Up By Cleaning Up

    George Hyfantis Jr. might not strike you as a global enterpreneur neur. He wears Mickey Mouse ties and scribbles notes to himself on the palm of his hand. But his eight-man environmental consulting firm works around the globe on such problems as surveying toxic-waste sites. These day ,he's looking toward Eastern Europe. "We've experienced their problems," hee says. "We've had trouble breathing." Now the Knoxville engineer finds himself in a position to do some good--and do well. His International Waste Management Systems is negotiating to build pollution monitoring equipment in Czechoslovakia. Though Eastern Europe is struggling at the moment, he says, "There will come a time when they will be our competitors in the ! world market. I would rather be working with them at that time than against them." ...
  • We Grew Accustomed To His Face

    Rex Harrison's 11-year-old granddaughter once said: "The difference between Grandfather and myself is that I'm going to be a serious actress." This "unserious" image dogged Harrison throughout his life, which ended last week at 82 when he died in New York of pancreatic cancer. He was the insouciant, throwaway actor who scored his biggest success in a Broadway musical, "My Fair Lady," whereas Olivier and Gielgud were the classical titans who grappled with Hamlet and Macbeth. Even Noel Coward told Harrison: "If you weren't the best light comedian in the country, all you'd be fit for is selling cars." ...
  • 'Rusty Tubs': The Navy's Ghost Fleet

    The Southwestern Victory once carried beans and bullets to troops in Europe, Korea and Vietnam. Now the only items on the old merchant ship are rust, dead pigeons and shards of haze-gray paint. Its pitted hull and 45-year-old steam-turbine engines haven't been tested in years. Yet the Navy is counting on the Southwestern Victory and other ships like it in a pinch. It's part of the National Defense Reserve Fleet (NDRF), intended to provide extra military supplies in a national emergency. The U.S. Maritime Administration (MARAD), which maintains the 331-ship fleet for the Navy, says some of it could go to sea on as little as five days' notice. Congressional critics say the Navy is counting on ghost ships. As many as a third may be useless, requiring months and millions of dollars in repairs to regain seaworthiness: "A rusty-tub program," says Democratic Rep. Ronald Wyden. ...
  • Wisconsin Is Talking...

    About the pregnant turtles that gross the road. Motorists either on purpose or mistaking the turtles for rocks or debris, often run over the plodding beasts, which inch their way along highways as they move to dry land to lay their eggs. There is already one endangered and two threatened turtle species in Wisconsin, so the state Department of Natural Resources is advising motorists to pull over and kindly help the turtles cross safely. Drivers are urged to drag the turtles by their tails to avoid their snapping jaws. It is, in case you're wondering, virtually impossible to tell which turtles are pregnant "without cutting them open," according to one expert. State troopers are less than enthusiastic about the turtle-aid program because they think it could cause highway accidents.
  • Buzzwords

    OK, you've been accepted to college and your next concern is, will I fit in? The most popular freshman college lingo: Heisman: Stiff-arm approach used to ward off suitors at parties. As in Heisman Trophy.Blower: Frosh who can't hold his beer. Usage: "Watch your shoes, Buffy. He's a blower."Teethmaster: A frat boy. Usage: "Does that teethmaster's hair ever get messy?"Gilligans: Freshmen who work in dorm cafeterias and wear white sanitary caps.Arnolds: Musclehead bouncers who keep freshmen out of bars. As in Schwarzenegger. Warrens: Male upperclassmen who date freshman women. As in Beatty.
  • The Mob

    This week's riddle: Is Vincent (Chin) Gigante, arrested last week by the FBI, the boss of New York's Genovese crime family or a hopeless paranoid schizophrenic who lives with his mother, cannot control himself and wanders around Greenwich Village in pajamas, bathrobe and slippers. The Feds say Chin, 62, has created a wacko role to conceal his true character. His brother, the Rev. Louis Gigante, disagrees: "He's not a boss. He urinates on himself. He talks to himself. The only time he's safe is when he sleeps."
  • Condoms For Kiev

    There are changes and then there are changes. The tumultuous political and social changes in the U.S.S.R. have not distracted the Soviets from another concern: condoms. Mayer Laboratories of Oak land, Calif., will build a plant near Kiev to manufacture up to 225 million prophylactics a year. There is a grave condom shortage in the Soviet Union--a problem compounded by the fact that Soviet condoms are also "too thick and cumbersome " according to a Mayer spokesman. During the last year the Soviets have had to buy millions of prophylactics from China and India to satisfy the urgent demand. But condoms from these countries, an expert said, are often of poor quality and risky.
  • Overworked?

    A survey of managers in eight industralized nations, including the U.S. and Britain, shows why some complain of being overworked. 95% work more than a 40-hour workweek.Only 49% vacationed for two weeks in the past 12 months. Two thirds say their jobs are more stressful than they were a decade ago.36% lack adequate skills to use a computer.57% say they would advance further in their field if they had more education.SOURCE PRIORITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS INC., THE 2IST CENTURY WORKPLACE
  • Alone At The Top

    Gorbachev and Bush established a new rapport at a summit that succeeded without producing breakthroughs on Germany or Lithuania. But a challenge from Boris Yeltsin cast a shadow on the Soviet leader's moment in the sun. ...
  • The Thrill Is Gone

    Summits aren't what they used to be, and I say thank God for that. True, as a great deal of commentary has pointed out over the past few days, much of the glamour, suspense and personal drama characteristic of these meetings at the political apex has been missing from the Bush-Gorbachev encounter. But the excitement of summits past was pretty much a function of more dangerous conditions. I don't pretend that what with the turmoil in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe and the continued deployment of tens of thousands of nuclear warheads around the world we do not live amid dangers. But much of the high-risk drama of summit conferences used to proceed from the rarity and consequent unpredictability of the meeting itself. Would the two touchy national supremos, each incurring some domestic risk by meeting at all and each watchdog jealous of his own political standing and his country's basic interests, get along? Might bad personal vibes or big misunderstandings make the relationship...
  • Chrysler Loses A Crew Chief

    Put yourself in Gerald Greenwald's position. You are the vice chairman of Chrysler Corp. and heir apparentto chairman Lee Iacocca. Iacocca, 65, is supposed to retire next year but is hinting he just might stay longer. Along comes an exciting--but risky--job offer. You could become chairman and chief executive of UAL Corp., the United Airlines parent, but there's a very big "if" attached. You get the job only if the unions that want to buy UAL can arrange the necessary financing. ...
  • 'A Job Wellesley Done'

    Their husbands had the easy job. Putting the cold war to bed is nothing compared with negotiating the conflicts of modern-day feminism. But Barbara Bush and Raisa Gorbacheva did some disarming of their own in a joint commencement speech at Wellesley College in Massachusetts. The First Ladies were models of diplomacy. They clasped hands and shared the stage like partners in perestroika. Gone was the "cat i fight" atmosphere that colored each meeting between Raisa and Nancy Reagan. Confronting the controversy over whether she was chosen to speak because of whom she married, Mrs Bush urged the all-woman graduating class to "respect difference [and] be compassionate" --and to remember there is more to life than a job. Then she won their hearts by suggesting that one day someone in the audience might follow in her footsteps as the president's spouse. "And I wish him well," she added, to an approving roar. ...
  • Coke Cans A Snakebitten Promotion

    It seemed like a good idea at the time: getting consumers to buy Coca-Cola Classic by filling random cans with money and prize certificates. But the soft-drink giant's "MagiCans" promotion was snakebitten from the outset. There were reports of malfunctioning prize delivery mechanisms (the money is supposed to pop out when you open the can), and one unwitting Massachusetts buyer drank from a broken can only to get a mouthful of the foul-tasting chlorinated water used to make it feel full. ...
  • Ted's Global Village

    Scenes from the toil of a globe-trotting correspondent: You're assigned to cover the Washington summit but can't get within shouting distance of anyone important. So like everyone else, you take notes off CNN, which your editors back in Brussels or Guatemala City or Denver could just as easily do for themselves. You're in a taxi headed for the Polish Parliament and the cabby says, "Hey, I learned my English from Bobbie Battista." Bobbie Battista? She's an obscure Atlanta-based anchor who has a big following in Poland, where there's no meat but plenty of feed from CNN. You're covering last spring's unrest in Tiananmen Square and you go inside to see the same scene on your hotel-room TV, literally bounced around the world and all the way back again. ...
  • Cover-Up In L.A.

    Here's a lesson in how not to draw attention to something you dislike. The cover of this month's Interview magazine features a decidedly racy photograph of Madonna grabbing her crotch, as is her tendency these days. It's been a very popular cover, but when the magazine decided to use it in large advertising posters on Los Angeles bus shelters, the company that owns the shelters would have none of this naughtiness. The Gannett Outdoor Co. placed a large red bar across Madonna's crotch in the posters--a graphic device that will almost certainly lure one's eyes to the offending pose. "Cities set standards of what can go on the streets," says Gannett spokesman Gary Duckworth, "and the Madonna poster we didn't feel could get by." The magazine, for its part, has a sense of humor about the situation. "They said it was too graphic so [they] added a graphic," laughs Interview publisher Sandy Brant. "It almost makes the picture better." ...
  • Yeltsin's Challenge

    Back from the political dead, a scrappy iconoclast puts a scare into Mikhail (Gorbachev and confronts President Bush with an awkward dilemma ...
  • 'I Dreamed Our House Caught Fire'

    Like Cezanne with Mont Sainte-Victoire, Richard Ford has for a time explored a single landscape. In some of the stories collected three years ago in "Rock Springs," and now in his novel, Wildlife (177pages. Atlantic Monthly. $18.95), the place, the situation and the characters are very nearly the same. The place is Grand Falls, Mont., in 1960. In each story, the narrator is a 16-year-old boy whose young mother is involved in an affair. In one story the father is dead, but in the rest he's alive: likable, marginally employed, he can be pushed to violence. The interloping lover is, of course, a louse, but usually a louse of some complexity-and the mother's reaction to him, her cleareyed willingness to break with her past, makes these stories eloquent. Ford shows us the moment when human connections come apart. ...
  • 'Rose's Century'

    The cake will be decorated with rosebuds, and there'll be three Roses on the guest list--great-granddaughters of Kennedy clan matriarch Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, who turns 100 next month. Three hundred and fifty guests, including 4 of her 9 children, 28 grandchildren, 22 great-grandchildren and such luminaries as New York Gov. Mario Cuomo (whose son, Andrew, is marrying RFK's daughter Kerry this week), will celebrate "Rose's Century" at a gala luncheon in Hyannis Port on July 15. And Congress will designate a special day in her honor. But Mrs. Kennedy, who is mostly confined to a wheelchair, is too fragile to participate in the festivities.
  • A Murder In Paradise

    Peter Matthiessen first heard about the murder of E. J. Watson when he was 17. "My father had a boat. We were coming up from the Florida Keys, and we put in at Everglade. He told me about this man who had been killed by his neighbors, a man otherwise very popular and successful, a successful planter. It stuck in my brain, this strange thing, a kind of community expurgation, and I never forgot it. ...
  • The Tiniest Patients

    Scores of obstacles confront a fetus struggling to grow from a mere fertilized egg into a sentient, conscious human being. There are fingers to mold from featureless blobs, brains to craft from undifferentiated protoplasm. One of the higher hurdles looms at the eighth week. That's when the diaphragm, separating the abdomen and chest, should close. But for unknown reasons, in about one of 2,500fetuses it remains open. As a result the stomach, intestines, spleen and part of the liver can spill into the chest, leaving the lungs with no room to grow. About 75 percent of such babies die--often right in the delivery room-unable to gasp even the tiniest breath. Now, at least for those fetuses in which the hernia has been detected by ultrasound, there is hope. Last week in The New England Journal of Medicine, a team of physic fans led by Dr. Michael Harrison of the University of California, San Francisco, reported that in two life-threatening cases, they had reached into the womb itself to...
  • New Mag?

    Is there a market for a New York magazine-style weekly in Los Angeles? Knapp Communications Corp. (Architectural Digest, Bon Appetit) seems to think so. Knapp has commissioned writer Jeanie Kasindorf of New York magazine to develop a prototype this summer. (New York is owned by Rupert Murdoch.) A Knapp spokesman said the project is "under study," but Kasindorf says talk of her becoming editor of the still-to-be-named mag is "premature." Knapp hopes to find a niche for a slick weekly between the upscale monthlies (Los Angeles Magazine, L.A. Style) and downscale weeklies (L.A. Weekly, L.A. Reader).
  • Giving Harvard Notice

    Derek Bok came to the presidency of Harvard University in 1971 with wails of student protest echoing through the yard. A lawyer by training and the dean of the Harvard Law School, he was part of a new breed of university president. They were crisis managers and problem solvers: lawyers like Terry Sanford at Duke, Edward Levi at Chicago, Kingman Brewster at Yale and Robben Fleming at Michigan or economists like William Bowen at Princeton. They busily managed, the times changed, and most moved on to high-profile government or foundation jobs, leaving behind swollen coffers and calm campuses. ...
  • Odd Couple

    Arkansas Republicans are having a bit of an identity crisis. In the primary race for lieutenant governor, one strong candidate is Kenneth (Muskie) Harris, a black real-estate company manager from Little Rock. The problem is, Harris's GOP primary opponent is one Ralph Forbes, a former member of the American Nazi Party who believes in racial separation. Several prominent Republicans, including gubernatorial candidate Sheffield Nelson, have been quick to endorse Harris and condemn Forbes. After some urging from supporters, Nelson also decided to contribute money to and campaign for Harris. The supporters believe such aid could help court black voters loyal to Democratic Gov. Bill Clinton.
  • Thanks For The Memories

    At the beginning of Total Recall, a spacesuited Arnold Schwarzenegger stands high on a Martian promontory, looking down on the vast reaches of the red planet. This image could symbolize the astonishing success of Schwarzenegger, the unlikely Austrian born bodybuilder who is now a top box-office megastar. While an action icon like Chuck Norris is strictly a creature of the pow-zap school, Schwarzenegger, under the aegis of filmmakers like James Cameron ("The Terminator"), Ivan Reitman ("Twins") and Dutch director Paul Verhoeven ("Total Recall"), has become a more complex and engaging figure. ...
  • Competition: Tried And True

    We are forever rediscovering old economic truths. Consider the case of Michael Porter, a respected observer of corporations who teaches at the Harvard Business School. He undertook a huge study of 10 nations to determine the secrets of economic success. The result is a book called "The Competitive Advantage of Nations."[*] And so, what creates national advantage? Porter's answer is essentially the same as Adam Smith's: competition. ...
  • The Last Days Of A Bloody Regime

    On the outskirts of Monrovia, four bullet-riddled bodies were strewn in the grass on the side of the road. At the other side of the Liberian capital, two large pools of blood and three severed fingers lay on the sidewalk of the St. Paul River bridge. Those victims who could be identified were from the Gio and Mano tribes, which provide the bulk of support for rebels fighting to topple President Samuel K. Doe, a Krahn tribesman. Yet not one of the victims appeared to be part of the five-month-old rebellion. "[The president's soldiers] are striking out wildly," a diplomat said of the killing, "the way an animal does when it's been wounded and feels it's going to die." ...
  • Rolling On The Miami River

    A long the Miami River, the sight is at once odd and commonplace. Loaded with mostly stolen bicycles in stacks the height of an 8-year-old, small cargo boats routinely chug down the river, headed for the Caribbean. After public calls for a crackdown on the illicit trade, city police recruited the U.S. Customs Service and Border Patrol agents last month to form a task force to stop the smuggling of stolen goods. Raiding boat after boat last week, agents hauled in 350 bikes, largely bound for Haiti where few people can afford cars. On the island, even the most battered bicycle can fetch between $30 and $50. ...
  • No, You Can't Have Nintendo

    My wife and I are the kind of mean parents whom kids grumble about on the playground. We're among that ever-shrinking group of parents known as Nintendo holdouts. We refuse to buy a Nintendo set.(Nintendo, for those of you who have been living in a cave for the past few years, is something that you hook up to your TV set that enables you to play various games on your home screen.) Around Christmas time, my son made a wish list, and I noticed that Nintendo was No. 1. I said, "You know you're not going to get Nintendo." He said, "I know I'm not going to get it from you. But I might get it from him. " Alas, Santa, too, let him down. ...
  • Big Boot For U.S. Soccer

    In the soccer-playing universe it is almost as rare as Halley's comet and could be just as fleeting: a rare sighting of the American team in the quadrennial World Cup. This Sunday the United States will end a 40-year World Cup drought when it takes the field against Czechoslovakia in Florence's Stadio Comunale. The U.S. squad is one of 24 teams that qualified for the 30-day tournament getting underway in Milan this week, and most pundits expect the Americans to pack their bags after the end of first-round play. But the last U.S. World Cup entry achieved one of the sport's all-time upsets, shocking England 1-0 in the 1960 tournament held in Brazil, and the coach of this year's contingent is warning opponents not to take his players too lightly. "We are not going to Italy just to show up," says Hungarian-born skipper Bob Gansler. "We have enough ability to finish." ...
  • Mrs. Bush's 'Three Choices'

    I hope many of you will consider making three very special choices. The first is to believe in something larger than yourself, to get involved in some of the big ideas of our time . . . Early on, I made another choice which I hope you will make as well. Whether you are talking about education, career, or service, you are talking about life and life really must have joy. It's supposed to be fun. One of the reasons I made the most important decision of my life, to marry George Bush, is because he made me laugh . . . ...
  • The Right's War On Poverty

    The phrase "bleeding-heart conservatives" may sound like a contradiction in terms. But there's a new War on Poverty, and the shock troops are coming from the Republican right. GOP House Whip Newt Gingrich is offering to pay third graders in five poor Georgia communities $2 for every book they read this summer. He'll cover the cost of Earning for Learning with his speaking fees. HUD Secretary Jack Kemp wants the federal government to "find a way to guarantee college educations for inner-city, low-income, underclass, minority children." To those who question the cost, Kemp says tartly, "This country is affluent enough to make that commitment." ...
  • Lust And The Middle-Aged Lawyer

    You remember the narrator of Scott Turow's "Presumed Innocent"--he was a prosecutor who stood trial for the murder of a woman colleague--but do you remember the lawyer who defended him? Probably not. Alejandro Stern is fat and stuffy, a workaholic who chainsmokes cigars. Neglectful of his family, Stern also keeps his distance from the common way of speech: "I would probably never bother you," he explains to a cop, "were I not waylaid with a moment on my hands." Relegated to the margins of an ingenious story, so tedious a character can't cause much damage-- yet in his new novel, The Bur den of Proof (Farrar Straus Giroux. $22.95), Turow blunders. He's made Stern the central figure. ...