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  • Will Sam Take The Fall?

    ABC executives already have an excuse in case the wildly hyped but deeply troubled news magazine "Prime Time Live" continues to founder: blame Sam. Although most of the show's producers are high on Sam Donaldson and sometimes down on Diane Sawyer, network executives such as Roone Arledge want to protect their heavy investment in Sawyer. The ABC brass apparently thinks Donaldson is "too hot" a figure for Sawyer's cool "star presence." Arledge was unavailable for comment. To separate the hot from the cool, ABC has decided to keep Donaldson in Washington and Sawyer in New York, rather than having the two coanchor from New York (ABC maintains the separation is only a matter of reporting logistics). Sam and Diane remain friendly and are eager to improve what they realize are major problems with the show.
  • Kurt Factor

    After intense jockeying between Austria and France to host the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe this fall, the French have reportedly won--in part because of the "Waldheim factor." The United States and several other countries passed the word that they were uneasy about using Austria as the site because of President Kurt Waldheim's Nazi past. Austria then promised that Waldheim would be nowhere in sight during the meetings says a U.S. official. But the French lobbied hard for Paris. The White House also backed France because it wants its support for a united Germany in NATO.
  • Japan Answers The 64-Megabit Question

    Advantage: Japan. Last week, Hitachi Ltd. unveiled the prototype for a new semiconductor that leapfrogs over a generation of memory-chip technology. These chips are essential to computers but are also finding use in such products as compact disc players and televisions. Hitachi's new dynamic access memory (DRAM) chip has a capacity of 64 megabits, or the equivalent of more than 500 newspaper pages. That's 16 times more storage than the current top-of-theline, four-megabit chips distributed by IBM and others. The relentless improvement in chip density has led Cypress Semiconductor founder T. J. Rodgers to affect a ho-hum attitude: "You hear about the newest generation I of chips, and you look down at your watch and say, is it 1991 yet?" But the crushing cost of | developing each new generation of DRAM chips is forcing American firms out of the process, giving dominance to the more well-heeled and patient Japanese. ...
  • Breaking Ice In The Pacific

    At San Francisco's Fairmont Hotel, South Korean President Roh Tae Woo beamed with excitement. Beside him stood Mikhail Gorbachev, tired and stiff. It was hard to believe the two leaders attended the same meeting. "Prospects for peace and eventual unification of the Korean Peninsula are growing brighter," Roh jubilantly told reporters. Gorbachev was far more restrained. Asked if last week's meeting would hasten Moscow and Seoul toward full diplomatic relations, the Soviet leader responded noncommittally. "Let the fruit grow ripe," he said, "and when it grows ripe, we shall eat it." ...
  • The Fame Game: Why Everyone's Gloating

    Whatever his financial future, Donald Trump is doomed to be a has-been. The die was cast not last week, but years ago, when he slipped the bounds of conventional notoriety and became a major star. Beyond the normal love-hate relationship Americans have always had with their celebrities (and without which a huge chunk of journalism couldn't exist), Trump is the victim of his own peculiar naivete about the way life works. Couldn't he (or anyone else?) see what all of his shameless self-promotion was setting him up for? Schadenfreude--a German word for glee over the misfortune of others--is actually as American as casino gambling. Famous as he is, Trump never understood the arc of fame. The boxing promoter never understood the point of that great boxing movie "The Harder They Fall". ...
  • Lessons For The Little Guy

    Face it, Donald Trump was right. If he hadn't borrowed all that money, he'd still be collecting rents in Queens. The rich don't get that way by saving pennies. They make their fortunes by finding suckers . . . er, bankers to give them loans. ...
  • Peri Picks

    Unfortunately, Spandex is still with us this summer. And shoulder-duster earrings have returned from the fashion graveyard. Short skirts are even shorter and a vaguely "Mod Squad"-style hippie look is favored among some college kids. Our ratings of some of the season's more interesting fashion items: [***] Long Shorts: Much better than short shorts. But the ones for guys are a bit fratty.[**] Sun Hats: Tans are out. Stay pale with these, but larger models can get out of hand.[****] Pucci Prints: Neon leggings are great. Leave the cat suits to Linda Evangelista.[**] Bras Only: If you want to be a Valkyrie, fine. Otherwise, it looks silly even on Madonna.
  • Tough Tactics By Ex-Troublemakers

    Call it poetic justice. Czechoslovakia's Communists used to round up opposition troublemakers before important national events. Now the troublemakers are in power, and last week, two days before the country's first free election in 44 years, police investigating corruption and "other criminal activities" pulled in half a dozen hard-line Communist leaders for questioning. They included former president Gustav Husak and party chief Milos Jakes. The next day, the government of Vaclav Havel accused the leader of another rival political party of being a secret-police informer, seriously damaging its chances on the eve of the all-important vote. ...
  • Trump: The Fall

    Once a symbol of cocky '80s wealth, Donald Trump is now tarnished by marital scandal, mired in debt and negotiating with banks to retain control of his empire. Even if he succeeds, the Trump "mystique' may never recover. ...
  • The Champion Of Passion

    D. H. Lawrence.By Jeffrey Meyers.446 pages. Knopf. $24.95.As the tide favoring censorship of the arts rises once more in this country, a new life of D. H. Lawrence takes on a certain poignancy. Lawrence was only 44 when tuberculosis felled him in 1930, but like James Joyce he's one of the great survivors of our century's frequent government-versus-art conflicts. In 1915 the British government, unprepared for candor about lesbianism and women's sexual desires, suppressed "The Rainbow." In 1929, the police closed down an exhibition of Lawrence's paintings, and from 1928 to 1960, customs officials on both sides of the Atlantic protected decent folk from "Lady Chatterley's Lover."It's hard to think of another modern novelist who preached loving life as incessantly as did this coal miner's son, yet he was constantly battered by it. Weak as a boy and often ill as a man, Lawrence was so dominated by his mother that during her life he could never love another woman. Later, feeling that...
  • Mandela Mania Grips America

    He will ride through the canyons of Manhattan in the biggest ticker-tape parade since the Mets won the '86 World Series. He will chat with President George Bush in the White House, lunch with the Kennedy clan in Boston and visit Martin Luther King Jr.'s tomb in Atlanta. By the time Nelson Mandela winds up his 12-day, eight-city tour of the United States, he will have mingled with Hollywood hotshots, spoken at $10-a-head rallies in Detroit and Oakland and attended a $5,000- to $25,000-a-plate dinner in New York City. He may or may not have met the poet in Boston who wants to read to him, the list of senators who want to be seen with him or the countless thousands across the country who just want to shake his hand. ...
  • Bring Your Own Guns

    San Francisco cops have long wanted to carry semiautomatic weapons so they could defend themselves against drug gangs that are often armed with Uzis and AK-47s. Last week they got the go-ahead to carry the weapons, but there is one hitch. The cops have to buy the semiautomatics with their own money because the police department can't afford them. The guns cost anywhere from $285 to $800 each. Still, most city cops said they would gladly fork it over themselves.
  • The Rusk Family War--And Peace

    The diplomat sits behind a professor's desk, an old man in a gray suit and maroon tie, working quietly under photographs of John F. Kennedy and Lyndon Baines Johnson. The trucker sits behind the wheel of an International tractor-trailer, a young man in a sweat-stained cap, T shirt and work pants, hauling cigarettes, candy and soda pop across the South. Both men are Rusks. Dean, the father, helped design and defend a conflict in Southeast Asia that killed 57,000 Americans and more than 1 million Vietnamese. Richard, the son, has spent the past 20 years brooding over how such a decent man could have ensnared himself in such a lousy war. Now they have collaborated on a fine exercise in reminiscence and self-redemption: As I Saw It (672pages. Norton. $29. 95), an honorable, no-apologies defense of Dean Rusk's career--and America's lost crusade in Vietnam. ...
  • Hey, Dad, Want To Play Slime World?

    The ultimate video-game battlefield may be the back seat of the family car. Handheld video games are already available from Nintendo and Atari. By Christmas NEC will introduce an even more sophisticated version that can double as a handheld television set. ...
  • Getting The Farmers To Kick The Habit

    W. D. Guthrie's grandfather smoked and chewed tobacco, mostly at the same time, for 90-some years before dying at 104. So Guthrie, a second-generation tobacco grower in Newport, N.C., doesn't buy the arguments against smoking. The evidence that does impress him is that tobacco pays. "There's a rule of thumb down here," Guthrie says. "For every 10 acres of corn you plant, you better plant one acre of tobacco to back it up." ...
  • Testing For Alzheimer's

    To doctors specializing in Alzheimer's disease, it was no surprise that Janet Adkins could still beat her son at tennis, yet could no longer play the piano. An Alzheimer's victim is like a city under prolonged artillery attack: the power plants may be failing, but the buses still run. Typically, the disease first affects memory and the ability to learn, then language skills and motor coordination. By the end--anywhere from three to 20 years after its onset--most patients are mute and uncomprehending. But there are many things they can still do before that vegetative state sets in. "These functions aren't lost at the same rate," explains Dr. David Bennett, clinical director of the Alzheimer's Disease Center at Chicago's Rush Presbyterian St. Luke's Medical Center. "We have some patients who are severely impaired, and yet they're still able to drive or play a good game of golf." ...
  • 'Archie Bunker With A Ph.D.'

    John Silber emerged from the sweaty trenches of the Springfield, Mass., Civic Center and the biggest moment of his neophyte political career. The state Democratic convention had given him 15.4 percent of its vote, just enough to put his name on September's primary ballot. Silber had spent the previous weeks lambasting media "smears" and denouncing the machinations of "insiders" who, he claimed, were trying to keep him out of the gubernatorial race. Now, as he headed for home, he paused to assess the rigors of Massachusetts politics. "All in all," he deadpanned, "I'd rather be in Philadelphia." ...
  • Buzzwords

    International bankers have developed their own vocabulary: Toxic Waste: Bonds that go beyond junk bonds, i.e., they're deadly.NlCs: A phonetic for newly industrialized countries. Usage: "Look out for the Pac-Rim (Pacific Rim) NICs."Clawback: An agreement in which a debtor country agrees to pay more interest if it gets a higher price for one of its commodities, such as oil. Usage: "We may get a clawback on that loan." Bradyize: The conversion of debt into a bond from the debtor country. Named for Treasury Secretary Nicholas Brady, a sometime advocate of this approach. A negative term since bankers often don't like to Bradyize.
  • Gorbachev: The Price Of Survival

    I have never encountered a Soviet delegation so tentative as the one that accompanied Gorbachev to Washington. Some of its members seemed nonplussed by the collapse of the Communist Party Others appeared torn between the familiar contours of central planning and the potential attractions of market economics. The head of the central planning agency lost command of his English when asked how his office was going to coordinate with the market sector, then did not seek to hide his irritation about this state of affairs. On the situation in Europe, they offered a series of complaints, fears and speculations. But these had a plaintive quality, as if they hoped America would rescue them from the consequences of their actions. ...
  • Out Of Bounds

    Prison inmate Anne Gates of Arabi, La., for trying to claim an inheritance from the husband she had been accused of killing with a fireplace poker. Gates was originally charged with murder in order to collect insurance, but later pleaded no contest to a reduced manslaughter charge. A Louisiana appeals court has ruled that Gates's plea could not be used as evidence that she is an "unworthy heir," so she may yet collect. Gates, by the way, is reportedly a suspect in the death of a previous husband.
  • Potholes Ahead On Tobacco Road

    Foreign visitors see the change most clearly--and take it hardest. Covering Mikhail Gorbachev's recent trip to San Francisco, an Italian journalist was so intimidated by the scorn of his neighbors I when he tried to light up that he left the pressroom in the middle of the Soviet chair- | man's speech to have a cigarette in his I hotel room. "This place is like a dictatorship of nonsmokers,' he grumbled to an I American colleague. 'I feel like a prison- | en" Most of the 49 million Americans who still smoke are similarly cowed these days, if a bit more resigned. When Shane Taylor found herself one of only three smokers in a Chicago office of 26. huddling in a hallway I without even a chair to smoke in, she decided to kick the habit. "Smoking just isn't condoned in our society," she said. "I've given up. I don't want to fight anymore." ...
  • Fighting The Greenhouse

    Of course you know what it will take to save the world from the greenhouse effect. To cut emissions of carbon dioxide--the gas released when coal, gas or oil burn and the one responsible for more than half of the impending global warming--you'll have to turn down the heater in winter and break out the long johns. In summer, don't even think of air conditioning. Chuck your 100-watt bulbs, screw in 40s. Trade in the dishwasher and clothes dryer for a dish drainer and laundry line. ...
  • Gremlins In The Halls Of Greed

    Gremlins 2 The New Batch is director Joe Dante's best film since . . . well, since "Gremlins." There's something about these madcap devil dolls that liberates Dante's infernal imagination. His satirical sensibility gets to run riot in this sequel. Abandoning the small-town setting of the original, Charlie Haas's sharp script--a happy mixture of sophistication and utter silliness--relocates the gremlins in the heart of corporate America: inside the sleek New York office tower of real estate and media mogul Daniel Clamp (John Glover), a megalomaniac billionaire who is one part Donald Trump, one part Ted Turner. (The loudspeakers in his building announce the showing on his cable network of "Casablanca," in a new colorized version with "a happier ending.") ...
  • A Plan For Europe

    At this meeting with so-called intellectuals in Washington, Gorbachev took me aside to say that a road map for the future was his most important concern. He was right. The upheavals of the past year make the creation of a new structure for European security essential. It must take into account the imminent unification of Germany as well as the de facto collapse of the Warsaw Pact. It has to define America's new relationship with Europe while granting the Soviet Union a serious role in Europe. ...
  • The Boys Are Back In Town

    Another 48 Hrs. is an atrocious movie, the embodiment of all the cynical commercialism that drives the summer season. Paramount skipped the usual reviewers' screenings in favor of one big all-media preview just before the film opened last week. This usually happens when a studio anticipates lousy reviews and wants to get a movie out fast to suck up the bucks the first weekend. Not that bad reviews are going to put one bump under the gravy train of this clear runaway smash. America has been waiting eight years for the sequel to "48 Hrs.," which made Eddie Murphy an instant box-office monster in his screen debut. ...
  • Glossy Home Companions

    When the French magazine Elle crashed onto these shores five years ago the reverberations were felt by everyone from the editors of mighty Vogue to fashion writers on local newspapers. The magazine was filled with unorthodox pairings of haute couture and street flash. Who else would put a humble T shirt under a $1,000 tunic? Elle's success spawned a legion of copiers. Vogue's current cover girl, for example, is adorned with a few artfully placed sea shells and not much else. ...
  • Iowa Factor

    Pro-choice candidates around the country are begging for help from the National Abortion Rights Action League these days. NARAL's support is largely credited for Iowa Democrat Don Avenson's win over popular Attorney General Tom Miller, an abortion foe, in last week's gubernatorial primary. "They're beating our doors down, where prior to [Iowa] we had to slip our support under the door," says NARAL president Kate Michelman. NARAL plans an all-out effort for incumbent Sen. Tom Harkin of Iowa and Gov. Jim Blanchard and Sen. Carl Levin of Michigan. But some Democratic leaders worry that NARAL's opposition to a parental-consent requirement for teenage abortions could be "too much of a good thing," particularly in Michigan, where there is a referendum on the issue.
  • Living A Life After John

    He was a lovable character," says Judith Jacklin Belushi of her husband, John, "but human, with his own struggles." While writing "Samurai Widow," the new book about her marriage and widowhood, she wasn't sure how to end it. Then she met writer-producer Victor Pisano. "I knew the book had ended when we got engaged," she says.
  • Kissing Couples

    If Alderman Robert Shaw has anything to say about it, Chicago bus riders will never see a proposed AIDS-awareness poster of kissing couples of different races and genders, under which is written: KISSING DOESN'T KILL: GREED AND INDIFFERENCE DO. The AIDS posters, designed by a group called Art Against AIDS and approved by the Chicago Transit Authority. are under fire from some city leaders--most notably, Shawl The alderman claims the posters represent a "camouflage" campaign to promote a certain lifestyle. A
  • Fund Drive

    So many people ignore the presidential campaign-fund checkoff on their IRS returns that it is projected to be $88 million in the red by the 1996 election. Only one in five taxpayers now checks the box earmarking $1 of his taxes for the fund--half the number of a decade ago. Former leaders of both parties are calling for a PR campaign on the fund's importance. Ronald Reagan has checked "No" on his tax returns; George Bush has checked "Yes."
  • Laughing Until It Hurts

    Jules Feiffer's new play Elliot Loves begins with a monologue delivered by Elliot (Anthony Heald), a fortyish Chicagoan. With his darting eyes, his tense jaw, his mouth moving in desperate twists, Elliot is like a living Feiffer cartoon, with that famous squiggly line that looks like the handwriting of anxiety. Elliot is trying to organize his thoughts on love, but the best he can come up with is to define it as "a gap, the distance between what you need and what you're getting." Elliot is also trying to pin down his feeling for his girlfriend Joanna, who has, he muses, "an innocent, unspoiled quality," although she's been divorced twice and has two children. ...
  • Keeping A Deadly Secret

    In the '50s and '60s, at the height of the cold war, Raymond Joe mined uranium to help meet the demands of the booming nuclear-weapons industry. For a total of 15 years the Navajo worked in the mines throughout the Southwest, at the outset earning as little as 90 cents an hour. Two years ago Joe was diagnosed with lung cancer, a victim, he believes, of the radiation in unventilated mine shafts. Doctors removed part of his right lung, but the cancer has recurred. At least 450 former uranium miners have already died of lung cancer, five times the expected average. And, as the miners and their families allege, for nearly 20 years the U.S. government knew the danger--and suppressed it. Says Joe, 57, who now lives in Shiprock, N.M., "We were never told that the work we did could affect our health." ...
  • Bad Manners In Minnesota

    Mikhail Gorbachev's visit to Minnesota after the summit was supposed to be a PR coup that would give Gov. Rudy Perpich a much-needed lift in the polls. Instead, what the visit raised was eyebrows. U.S. protocol chief Joseph Reed was quoted as saying the Democratic governor "behaved very badly" by failing to invite the state's two Republican senators to the lunch he gave for the Soviet president at his mansion. (Reed later said he had merely called Perpich's behavior "regrettable.") Sens. Rudy Boschwitz and David Durenberger had to eat with the B list in the St. Paul College Club. "They showed up at the mansion and were turned away," said Reed. Perpich did manage to find room for his daughter and son, as well as for a florist and his wife. ...
  • Yo, Adrian! Is This Art?

    So there he stood, frozen in time, looking down over his city like a bronzed colossus. Clothed in his boxer's garb, his arms forever upstretched in jubilation and triumph, Rocky Balboa had laid claim to the steps of the Philadelphia Museum of Art once again. And the City of Brotherly Love--the scene of his triumph, the birthplace of the Rocky saga, the epitome of serenity and boredom--is a city at war with itself. ...
  • Nintendo And Beyond

    With flashy graphics, dazzling sound and ever-zippier software, the leader in video games--and its two chief rivals, NEC and Sega--looks to the future ...
  • Here's Looking At You, Kid

    Take an early look at the Vikings'2010 draft pick, Marcus (Heads Up) Gastineau. The 5month-old son of Mark Gastineau, late of the New York Jets, lives with his mother, Brigitte Nielsen. The great Dane says, "He's a very big boy, very strong, but Iwon't guide him in one direction. I can't say he'll be a football player. He may be a computer scientist." And if Marcus needs a lullaby, Mom can just croon her just recorded single, "Rough and I Ready for Love."
  • Germany: Unanswered Questions

    The great mistake of the statesmen at Versailles in 1919 had been to reconstitute Germany as a national entity, to give no wider horizon than the national one to the aspirations of the German people," wrote the statesman George F. Kennan in his memoirs. "Now we were faced with this problem once again." He was speaking of 1949, but the words have lost no power. George Bush and Mikhail Gorbachev met last week in hopes of locating some wider horizon for the reunification of Germany. Would it be NATO, as the West would like? Or the shapeless 35-nation Helsinki-accords cluster known as the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe (CSCE)? For the moment, both Bush and Gorbachev were frustrated. "The Soviets can't stop Germany from uniting and the united Germany will be in NATO," said a senior U.S. official "But without the Soviets' blessing, unification could come to a messy ... conclusion, with elements of real danger." ...
  • Burma: No Win For Ne Win

    For the last 10 months, Daw Aung San Suu Kyi has languished in internal exile beside a Burmese lake, reading books on the lawn of her whitewashed villa as government soldiers glare at her from a few yards away. But Suu Kyi, the 44-year old daughter of a Burmese independence hero, has suddenly re-emerged as her country's most important opposition politician. Last week her National League for Democracy (NLD) swept to a surprise victory in military-run parliamentary elections-making remote Burma the latest, and in some ways most unlikely, country to demand democracy. ...
  • Gorb's Fear Of Choppers

    Mikhail Gorbachev agreed to waive a longstanding Soviet security phobia against helicopters last week when he lifted off from the White House lawn for the summit meeting at Camp David. But Gorby agreed to the chopper ride only after a curious condition was met: he insisted that he accompany his host, President Bush, on Marine One. The Secret Service and Soviet security officials balked at the prospect of the two superpower leaders aloft in the same aircraft. (For security reasons, Bush and Vice President Dan Quayle never fly together.) But Bush, eager to be the gracious host and tour guide, overruled the objections. The two men whisked away together to the presidential hideaway. Barbara Bush and Raisa Gorbacheva followed on a separate chopper. ...
  • Was It Illness Or Immorality?

    From the time he admitted making a series of obscene phone calls last March to the home of a Virginia police officer and his wife, former American University president Richard Berendzen has been at the center of an intriguing psychiatric debate. Berendzen resigned his presidency and underwent intensive therapy at The Johns Hopkins Hospital, which helped him win a suspended sentence from the court. But some commentators felt he had been let off the moral hook too easily. Not least of the doubters was Susan Allen, the object of most of the bizarre phone calls. Appearing on ABC's "Nightline," she listened stonily as Berendzen and Dr. Paul McHugh, chief psychiatrist at Johns Hopkins Medical School, told how he recalled being sexually abused as a child--a memory "triggered" at the funeral of his father, who died in the very room where the abuse occurred. That, Allen snorted, was no excuse. Berendzen may well have been sick, but he should have controlled himself. "Each time they [obscene...
  • The Itch And The Scratch

    They're ba-ack . . . Tick season is upon us again, and Ixodes dammini, the tiny species that unleashes the ravages of Lyme disease, is on the march--out of the woods, up over your socks and right onto your bare calves. The bugs are back and so are the anxious patients, inundating doctors' waiting rooms with symptoms that range from inflamed hair follicles to unexplained fatigue. Sometimes, a quick inspection and a brief chat are all the physician needs to determine that the affliction is not Lyme. If it is, however, the diagnosis is often a lengthy quest, yielding equivocal results. But people who are bugged want clear answers and fast fixes; that itch has opened the way to fast bucks and some sloppy medicine. "You know America. I know America," says Dr. David Harris, health commissioner for Suffolk County, N.Y., one of the peak areas of Lyme incidence. "Some people do use exaggerated fears to sell products." ...
  • Back In Boston

    At a Kennedy Library fundraiser last week, Jacqueline Onassis showed up with her longtime companion, investment wizard Maurice Tempelsman. Earlier in the day, sans Maurice, she applauded warmly as her daughter. Caroline, unveiled a statute of John F. Kennedy outside the Massachusetts State House. Jackie was speechless, but Sen. Edward Kennedy quipped, "I can tell from Jack's expression that he is already feeling uncomfortable on his pedestal."
  • In China, Disappearing Dissidents

    The terse, scribbled note delivered to Hou Dejian's Beijing apartment said a great deal about the government's ruthless war on dissent. The previously announced news conference was canceled, Hou's note said, on account of "personal business." Beijing's most outspoken remaining dissident had vanished. So had the Taiwan-born pop singer's associates, university teacher Gao Xin and computer-company executive Zhou Duo. A year ago Hou, Gao and Zhou joined university lecturer Liu Xiabo in a hunger strike in Tiananmen Square. Two days later the government launched its crackdown. ...
  • Time To Wind Down The Party

    Mikhail Gorbachev travels well. But at home he plays to a half-full house. Last week's election of Boris Yeltsin as chairman of the Russian Republic's parliament was a sign of discontent over the pace of reform. While East European governments are actually grappling their way from the plan to the market, Soviet reformers still mark time. At the core of the problem is the inherent weakness of the government--in contrast to its counterparts in Poland, Czechoslovakia or Hungary. ...
  • A Season Of Sleaze In Tv News

    Tappy Phillips, ace reporter for New York's local "Eyewitness News," was hot in pursuit of a major homicide case. As the camera zoomed in on a New | York City detective, she grilled him about the stabbing death of a teenage girl found lifeless on a beach. Another preppy murder? A case of "wilding" redux? Not quite. The victim was Laura Palmer, the fictitious corpse of ABC's cult favorite "Twin Peaks." After 90 seconds of air time, the sleuth rendered his verdict: the killer had to be the father of Laura's boyfriend Bobby Briggs. ...
  • The Salaryman As Abe Lincoln

    James R. Schueler, chief executive, wonders why so many Americans complain about not being able to sell in the Japanese market. What's all the fuss about having to set up shop in Japan to succeed, about being willing to take losses if need be? Take losses? Schueler sits in his office in Hamilton, Mont., and takes orders. He says he gets "several calls a month" from overseas customers wanting what his company's got--a product that retails at about $100,000 a pop. His exports to Japan have more than doubled in five years. Over the next five years, he predicts, his sales to the Far East will go from 5 percent of his overall business to 25 percent. ...
  • The Venetian Carnival

    Jenny Holzer, the 4-year-old American "word artist," is the official sensation of this year's gathering of art-world tribes, the 44th Venice Biennale (through Sept. 30). Her spectacular display of deadpan "Truisms," blazing across rows of LED (light-emitting diode) signs, and her Roman-letter "Laments," carved into marble floors and benches, was awarded the grand prize for the best national pavilion. The unofficial rude-boy-in-church prize went to Jeff Koons, who displayed his work in the "Aperto"--or open--section for young artists, held farther down the canal in the cavernous old rope factory, the Corderie dell'Arsenale. Koons, who likes to tweak the nose of the art world, collaborated with Cicciolina, the former porn actress who's a member of the Italian Parliament. They posed naked for three big, soft-core photos and one unbearably unerotic sculpture. ...
  • Off-Base Air Base?

    Pentagon officials call it "a military base for the 21st century." This summer, if the Defense Department has its way, bulldozers will plow up olive groves and pastures near the southern Italian town of Crotone. The project: a brand-new $741 million Air Force base replete with "Mediterranean motif" buildings, a shopping mall and hotel. But the Crotone plan may end up as just another remnant of the cold war rendered obsolete by the Soviet retreat in Eastern Europe. Even before perestroika, the project had its detractors--some NATO officials jokingly refer to it as a "theme park." Says Democratic Rep. Patricia Schroeder: "Now that peace has broken out, it's a real waste of money." ...
  • A Raging Bull In A Briar Patch

    Housing and retail sales are "falling. Unemployment is edging upward. And last week the government's index of leading indicators took a dive along with new factory orders. Yet the stock market responded to the economic warning signals by staging another big rally. Investors pushed the Dow Jones industrial average to 2900.97, the third weekly record in a row and a 9 percent gain since April. ...
  • A Head, Or Two, Of Their Times

    Millionaire Eddie Murphy is worth only about 75 cents in Tanzania-if you're talking postage stamps. The superstar comic, along with the late Sammy Davis Jr., Gladys Knight (Pipless), Stevie Wonder, Smokey Robinson and three African-born performers, is part of a new series celebrating the achievements of black entertainers. Michael Jackson and Bill Cosby appear on two high-denomination souvenir sheets (350 shillings apiece). The Cos on your electric bill? Murphy staring up from a mash note? Now that's special delivery.
  • A Real Kongfrontation

    The city of Orlando is too hot, it's too far from the beach--and it's the No. 1 tourist destination in the world. Rides are the reason. Anyone who minimizes the impact of Space Mountain or Journey into Imagination upon the area need only consider the Orlando airport. Before Walt Disney World opened in 1971, it handled 900,000 travelers annually; with the Magic Kingdom now joined by Epcot Center and the Disney MGM Studios Theme Park, 17 million pass through each year. Obviously, ordinary amusement-park rides could never bring on such a boom. This is the age of the "themed attraction," which provides a little narrative with your nausea. Disney's Star Tours, Body Wars, The Great Movie Ride--these are tunnels of love with plot twists, the Tilta-Whirl as modern American novel. But now the company has something it never really had in Florida before, and perhaps never expected: competition. Universal Studios has opened an "entertainment themed attraction." In English, that means rides and...
  • Behind The Boasting

    Mikhail Gorbachev needed a victory--and the Bush administration was determined he should have one. In a ceremonial flurry last week, Gorbachev and George Bush approved a series of agreements designed to make the Soviet leader look like a winner in arms control. They pointed to progress on the eight-year quest for a treaty reducing the two sides' strategic nuclear arsenals. They signed an agreement to destroy huge stockpiles of chemical weapons. And in business left over from the days of Brezhnev and Ford, they wrapped up details for on-site inspection of nuclear testing. Altogether, proclaimed Secretary of State James Baker, the accords helped move the superpowers from the "balance of terror" to "the steadier ground of balance of interests." But the movement was less than met the eye. ...
  • Secondhand Smoke: Some Grim News

    There's no denying that cigarettes are a lethal addiction: smoking kills more than six times as many Americans every year as died in the entire Vietnam War. But secondhand smoke remains a source of bitter contention. Is it really a public health hazard, as the antismoking forces contend? Or is it just an annoyance? Four years ago, the U.S. Surgeon General's office and the National Research Council tackled the question. In separate reports, both firmly linked passive smoking to lung cancer. They also found that smokers' children suffered more than their share of respiratory infections. But neither panel tried to gauge the overall impact of passive smoking on the nation's health. The evidence was still too sketchy. ...