News

News

More Articles

  • We Grew Accustomed To His Face

    Rex Harrison's 11-year-old granddaughter once said: "The difference between Grandfather and myself is that I'm going to be a serious actress." This "unserious" image dogged Harrison throughout his life, which ended last week at 82 when he died in New York of pancreatic cancer. He was the insouciant, throwaway actor who scored his biggest success in a Broadway musical, "My Fair Lady," whereas Olivier and Gielgud were the classical titans who grappled with Hamlet and Macbeth. Even Noel Coward told Harrison: "If you weren't the best light comedian in the country, all you'd be fit for is selling cars." ...
  • 'Rusty Tubs': The Navy's Ghost Fleet

    The Southwestern Victory once carried beans and bullets to troops in Europe, Korea and Vietnam. Now the only items on the old merchant ship are rust, dead pigeons and shards of haze-gray paint. Its pitted hull and 45-year-old steam-turbine engines haven't been tested in years. Yet the Navy is counting on the Southwestern Victory and other ships like it in a pinch. It's part of the National Defense Reserve Fleet (NDRF), intended to provide extra military supplies in a national emergency. The U.S. Maritime Administration (MARAD), which maintains the 331-ship fleet for the Navy, says some of it could go to sea on as little as five days' notice. Congressional critics say the Navy is counting on ghost ships. As many as a third may be useless, requiring months and millions of dollars in repairs to regain seaworthiness: "A rusty-tub program," says Democratic Rep. Ronald Wyden. ...
  • Wisconsin Is Talking...

    About the pregnant turtles that gross the road. Motorists either on purpose or mistaking the turtles for rocks or debris, often run over the plodding beasts, which inch their way along highways as they move to dry land to lay their eggs. There is already one endangered and two threatened turtle species in Wisconsin, so the state Department of Natural Resources is advising motorists to pull over and kindly help the turtles cross safely. Drivers are urged to drag the turtles by their tails to avoid their snapping jaws. It is, in case you're wondering, virtually impossible to tell which turtles are pregnant "without cutting them open," according to one expert. State troopers are less than enthusiastic about the turtle-aid program because they think it could cause highway accidents.
  • Buzzwords

    OK, you've been accepted to college and your next concern is, will I fit in? The most popular freshman college lingo: Heisman: Stiff-arm approach used to ward off suitors at parties. As in Heisman Trophy.Blower: Frosh who can't hold his beer. Usage: "Watch your shoes, Buffy. He's a blower."Teethmaster: A frat boy. Usage: "Does that teethmaster's hair ever get messy?"Gilligans: Freshmen who work in dorm cafeterias and wear white sanitary caps.Arnolds: Musclehead bouncers who keep freshmen out of bars. As in Schwarzenegger. Warrens: Male upperclassmen who date freshman women. As in Beatty.
  • The Mob

    This week's riddle: Is Vincent (Chin) Gigante, arrested last week by the FBI, the boss of New York's Genovese crime family or a hopeless paranoid schizophrenic who lives with his mother, cannot control himself and wanders around Greenwich Village in pajamas, bathrobe and slippers. The Feds say Chin, 62, has created a wacko role to conceal his true character. His brother, the Rev. Louis Gigante, disagrees: "He's not a boss. He urinates on himself. He talks to himself. The only time he's safe is when he sleeps."
  • Condoms For Kiev

    There are changes and then there are changes. The tumultuous political and social changes in the U.S.S.R. have not distracted the Soviets from another concern: condoms. Mayer Laboratories of Oak land, Calif., will build a plant near Kiev to manufacture up to 225 million prophylactics a year. There is a grave condom shortage in the Soviet Union--a problem compounded by the fact that Soviet condoms are also "too thick and cumbersome " according to a Mayer spokesman. During the last year the Soviets have had to buy millions of prophylactics from China and India to satisfy the urgent demand. But condoms from these countries, an expert said, are often of poor quality and risky.
  • Overworked?

    A survey of managers in eight industralized nations, including the U.S. and Britain, shows why some complain of being overworked. 95% work more than a 40-hour workweek.Only 49% vacationed for two weeks in the past 12 months. Two thirds say their jobs are more stressful than they were a decade ago.36% lack adequate skills to use a computer.57% say they would advance further in their field if they had more education.SOURCE PRIORITY MANAGEMENT SYSTEMS INC., THE 2IST CENTURY WORKPLACE
  • Alone At The Top

    Gorbachev and Bush established a new rapport at a summit that succeeded without producing breakthroughs on Germany or Lithuania. But a challenge from Boris Yeltsin cast a shadow on the Soviet leader's moment in the sun. ...
  • The Thrill Is Gone

    Summits aren't what they used to be, and I say thank God for that. True, as a great deal of commentary has pointed out over the past few days, much of the glamour, suspense and personal drama characteristic of these meetings at the political apex has been missing from the Bush-Gorbachev encounter. But the excitement of summits past was pretty much a function of more dangerous conditions. I don't pretend that what with the turmoil in the Soviet Union and Eastern Europe and the continued deployment of tens of thousands of nuclear warheads around the world we do not live amid dangers. But much of the high-risk drama of summit conferences used to proceed from the rarity and consequent unpredictability of the meeting itself. Would the two touchy national supremos, each incurring some domestic risk by meeting at all and each watchdog jealous of his own political standing and his country's basic interests, get along? Might bad personal vibes or big misunderstandings make the relationship...
  • Chrysler Loses A Crew Chief

    Put yourself in Gerald Greenwald's position. You are the vice chairman of Chrysler Corp. and heir apparentto chairman Lee Iacocca. Iacocca, 65, is supposed to retire next year but is hinting he just might stay longer. Along comes an exciting--but risky--job offer. You could become chairman and chief executive of UAL Corp., the United Airlines parent, but there's a very big "if" attached. You get the job only if the unions that want to buy UAL can arrange the necessary financing. ...
  • 'A Job Wellesley Done'

    Their husbands had the easy job. Putting the cold war to bed is nothing compared with negotiating the conflicts of modern-day feminism. But Barbara Bush and Raisa Gorbacheva did some disarming of their own in a joint commencement speech at Wellesley College in Massachusetts. The First Ladies were models of diplomacy. They clasped hands and shared the stage like partners in perestroika. Gone was the "cat i fight" atmosphere that colored each meeting between Raisa and Nancy Reagan. Confronting the controversy over whether she was chosen to speak because of whom she married, Mrs Bush urged the all-woman graduating class to "respect difference [and] be compassionate" --and to remember there is more to life than a job. Then she won their hearts by suggesting that one day someone in the audience might follow in her footsteps as the president's spouse. "And I wish him well," she added, to an approving roar. ...
  • Coke Cans A Snakebitten Promotion

    It seemed like a good idea at the time: getting consumers to buy Coca-Cola Classic by filling random cans with money and prize certificates. But the soft-drink giant's "MagiCans" promotion was snakebitten from the outset. There were reports of malfunctioning prize delivery mechanisms (the money is supposed to pop out when you open the can), and one unwitting Massachusetts buyer drank from a broken can only to get a mouthful of the foul-tasting chlorinated water used to make it feel full. ...
  • Ted's Global Village

    Scenes from the toil of a globe-trotting correspondent: You're assigned to cover the Washington summit but can't get within shouting distance of anyone important. So like everyone else, you take notes off CNN, which your editors back in Brussels or Guatemala City or Denver could just as easily do for themselves. You're in a taxi headed for the Polish Parliament and the cabby says, "Hey, I learned my English from Bobbie Battista." Bobbie Battista? She's an obscure Atlanta-based anchor who has a big following in Poland, where there's no meat but plenty of feed from CNN. You're covering last spring's unrest in Tiananmen Square and you go inside to see the same scene on your hotel-room TV, literally bounced around the world and all the way back again. ...
  • Cover-Up In L.A.

    Here's a lesson in how not to draw attention to something you dislike. The cover of this month's Interview magazine features a decidedly racy photograph of Madonna grabbing her crotch, as is her tendency these days. It's been a very popular cover, but when the magazine decided to use it in large advertising posters on Los Angeles bus shelters, the company that owns the shelters would have none of this naughtiness. The Gannett Outdoor Co. placed a large red bar across Madonna's crotch in the posters--a graphic device that will almost certainly lure one's eyes to the offending pose. "Cities set standards of what can go on the streets," says Gannett spokesman Gary Duckworth, "and the Madonna poster we didn't feel could get by." The magazine, for its part, has a sense of humor about the situation. "They said it was too graphic so [they] added a graphic," laughs Interview publisher Sandy Brant. "It almost makes the picture better." ...
  • Yeltsin's Challenge

    Back from the political dead, a scrappy iconoclast puts a scare into Mikhail (Gorbachev and confronts President Bush with an awkward dilemma ...
  • 'I Dreamed Our House Caught Fire'

    Like Cezanne with Mont Sainte-Victoire, Richard Ford has for a time explored a single landscape. In some of the stories collected three years ago in "Rock Springs," and now in his novel, Wildlife (177pages. Atlantic Monthly. $18.95), the place, the situation and the characters are very nearly the same. The place is Grand Falls, Mont., in 1960. In each story, the narrator is a 16-year-old boy whose young mother is involved in an affair. In one story the father is dead, but in the rest he's alive: likable, marginally employed, he can be pushed to violence. The interloping lover is, of course, a louse, but usually a louse of some complexity-and the mother's reaction to him, her cleareyed willingness to break with her past, makes these stories eloquent. Ford shows us the moment when human connections come apart. ...
  • 'Rose's Century'

    The cake will be decorated with rosebuds, and there'll be three Roses on the guest list--great-granddaughters of Kennedy clan matriarch Rose Fitzgerald Kennedy, who turns 100 next month. Three hundred and fifty guests, including 4 of her 9 children, 28 grandchildren, 22 great-grandchildren and such luminaries as New York Gov. Mario Cuomo (whose son, Andrew, is marrying RFK's daughter Kerry this week), will celebrate "Rose's Century" at a gala luncheon in Hyannis Port on July 15. And Congress will designate a special day in her honor. But Mrs. Kennedy, who is mostly confined to a wheelchair, is too fragile to participate in the festivities.
  • A Murder In Paradise

    Peter Matthiessen first heard about the murder of E. J. Watson when he was 17. "My father had a boat. We were coming up from the Florida Keys, and we put in at Everglade. He told me about this man who had been killed by his neighbors, a man otherwise very popular and successful, a successful planter. It stuck in my brain, this strange thing, a kind of community expurgation, and I never forgot it. ...
  • The Tiniest Patients

    Scores of obstacles confront a fetus struggling to grow from a mere fertilized egg into a sentient, conscious human being. There are fingers to mold from featureless blobs, brains to craft from undifferentiated protoplasm. One of the higher hurdles looms at the eighth week. That's when the diaphragm, separating the abdomen and chest, should close. But for unknown reasons, in about one of 2,500fetuses it remains open. As a result the stomach, intestines, spleen and part of the liver can spill into the chest, leaving the lungs with no room to grow. About 75 percent of such babies die--often right in the delivery room-unable to gasp even the tiniest breath. Now, at least for those fetuses in which the hernia has been detected by ultrasound, there is hope. Last week in The New England Journal of Medicine, a team of physic fans led by Dr. Michael Harrison of the University of California, San Francisco, reported that in two life-threatening cases, they had reached into the womb itself to...
  • New Mag?

    Is there a market for a New York magazine-style weekly in Los Angeles? Knapp Communications Corp. (Architectural Digest, Bon Appetit) seems to think so. Knapp has commissioned writer Jeanie Kasindorf of New York magazine to develop a prototype this summer. (New York is owned by Rupert Murdoch.) A Knapp spokesman said the project is "under study," but Kasindorf says talk of her becoming editor of the still-to-be-named mag is "premature." Knapp hopes to find a niche for a slick weekly between the upscale monthlies (Los Angeles Magazine, L.A. Style) and downscale weeklies (L.A. Weekly, L.A. Reader).
  • Giving Harvard Notice

    Derek Bok came to the presidency of Harvard University in 1971 with wails of student protest echoing through the yard. A lawyer by training and the dean of the Harvard Law School, he was part of a new breed of university president. They were crisis managers and problem solvers: lawyers like Terry Sanford at Duke, Edward Levi at Chicago, Kingman Brewster at Yale and Robben Fleming at Michigan or economists like William Bowen at Princeton. They busily managed, the times changed, and most moved on to high-profile government or foundation jobs, leaving behind swollen coffers and calm campuses. ...
  • Odd Couple

    Arkansas Republicans are having a bit of an identity crisis. In the primary race for lieutenant governor, one strong candidate is Kenneth (Muskie) Harris, a black real-estate company manager from Little Rock. The problem is, Harris's GOP primary opponent is one Ralph Forbes, a former member of the American Nazi Party who believes in racial separation. Several prominent Republicans, including gubernatorial candidate Sheffield Nelson, have been quick to endorse Harris and condemn Forbes. After some urging from supporters, Nelson also decided to contribute money to and campaign for Harris. The supporters believe such aid could help court black voters loyal to Democratic Gov. Bill Clinton.
  • Thanks For The Memories

    At the beginning of Total Recall, a spacesuited Arnold Schwarzenegger stands high on a Martian promontory, looking down on the vast reaches of the red planet. This image could symbolize the astonishing success of Schwarzenegger, the unlikely Austrian born bodybuilder who is now a top box-office megastar. While an action icon like Chuck Norris is strictly a creature of the pow-zap school, Schwarzenegger, under the aegis of filmmakers like James Cameron ("The Terminator"), Ivan Reitman ("Twins") and Dutch director Paul Verhoeven ("Total Recall"), has become a more complex and engaging figure. ...
  • Competition: Tried And True

    We are forever rediscovering old economic truths. Consider the case of Michael Porter, a respected observer of corporations who teaches at the Harvard Business School. He undertook a huge study of 10 nations to determine the secrets of economic success. The result is a book called "The Competitive Advantage of Nations."[*] And so, what creates national advantage? Porter's answer is essentially the same as Adam Smith's: competition. ...
  • The Last Days Of A Bloody Regime

    On the outskirts of Monrovia, four bullet-riddled bodies were strewn in the grass on the side of the road. At the other side of the Liberian capital, two large pools of blood and three severed fingers lay on the sidewalk of the St. Paul River bridge. Those victims who could be identified were from the Gio and Mano tribes, which provide the bulk of support for rebels fighting to topple President Samuel K. Doe, a Krahn tribesman. Yet not one of the victims appeared to be part of the five-month-old rebellion. "[The president's soldiers] are striking out wildly," a diplomat said of the killing, "the way an animal does when it's been wounded and feels it's going to die." ...
  • Rolling On The Miami River

    A long the Miami River, the sight is at once odd and commonplace. Loaded with mostly stolen bicycles in stacks the height of an 8-year-old, small cargo boats routinely chug down the river, headed for the Caribbean. After public calls for a crackdown on the illicit trade, city police recruited the U.S. Customs Service and Border Patrol agents last month to form a task force to stop the smuggling of stolen goods. Raiding boat after boat last week, agents hauled in 350 bikes, largely bound for Haiti where few people can afford cars. On the island, even the most battered bicycle can fetch between $30 and $50. ...
  • No, You Can't Have Nintendo

    My wife and I are the kind of mean parents whom kids grumble about on the playground. We're among that ever-shrinking group of parents known as Nintendo holdouts. We refuse to buy a Nintendo set.(Nintendo, for those of you who have been living in a cave for the past few years, is something that you hook up to your TV set that enables you to play various games on your home screen.) Around Christmas time, my son made a wish list, and I noticed that Nintendo was No. 1. I said, "You know you're not going to get Nintendo." He said, "I know I'm not going to get it from you. But I might get it from him. " Alas, Santa, too, let him down. ...
  • Big Boot For U.S. Soccer

    In the soccer-playing universe it is almost as rare as Halley's comet and could be just as fleeting: a rare sighting of the American team in the quadrennial World Cup. This Sunday the United States will end a 40-year World Cup drought when it takes the field against Czechoslovakia in Florence's Stadio Comunale. The U.S. squad is one of 24 teams that qualified for the 30-day tournament getting underway in Milan this week, and most pundits expect the Americans to pack their bags after the end of first-round play. But the last U.S. World Cup entry achieved one of the sport's all-time upsets, shocking England 1-0 in the 1960 tournament held in Brazil, and the coach of this year's contingent is warning opponents not to take his players too lightly. "We are not going to Italy just to show up," says Hungarian-born skipper Bob Gansler. "We have enough ability to finish." ...
  • Mrs. Bush's 'Three Choices'

    I hope many of you will consider making three very special choices. The first is to believe in something larger than yourself, to get involved in some of the big ideas of our time . . . Early on, I made another choice which I hope you will make as well. Whether you are talking about education, career, or service, you are talking about life and life really must have joy. It's supposed to be fun. One of the reasons I made the most important decision of my life, to marry George Bush, is because he made me laugh . . . ...
  • The Right's War On Poverty

    The phrase "bleeding-heart conservatives" may sound like a contradiction in terms. But there's a new War on Poverty, and the shock troops are coming from the Republican right. GOP House Whip Newt Gingrich is offering to pay third graders in five poor Georgia communities $2 for every book they read this summer. He'll cover the cost of Earning for Learning with his speaking fees. HUD Secretary Jack Kemp wants the federal government to "find a way to guarantee college educations for inner-city, low-income, underclass, minority children." To those who question the cost, Kemp says tartly, "This country is affluent enough to make that commitment." ...
  • Lust And The Middle-Aged Lawyer

    You remember the narrator of Scott Turow's "Presumed Innocent"--he was a prosecutor who stood trial for the murder of a woman colleague--but do you remember the lawyer who defended him? Probably not. Alejandro Stern is fat and stuffy, a workaholic who chainsmokes cigars. Neglectful of his family, Stern also keeps his distance from the common way of speech: "I would probably never bother you," he explains to a cop, "were I not waylaid with a moment on my hands." Relegated to the margins of an ingenious story, so tedious a character can't cause much damage-- yet in his new novel, The Bur den of Proof (Farrar Straus Giroux. $22.95), Turow blunders. He's made Stern the central figure. ...
  • The Leaders Next Time

    "We have no order and we never will, because we walk on our heads and think with our bottoms," wrote Soviet citizen Vasily Yenot in Moscow News earlier this month. It was a pungent expression of a growing Soviet sentiment: true reform is beyond the competence of the present leadership. While few expect President Mikhail Gorbachev to leave power voluntarily or otherwise any time soon, Muscovites are beginning to gossip about possible successors. Following are sketches of some of the most prominent. They typically belong to the generation born just before or during the second world war: old enough to have been brought up in orthodox Communist Party folkways, yet young enough to be untainted by association with Stalinism. All are rising in influence All are people to watch: ...
  • Measles Mystery

    A mysterious outbreak of measles has already killed three children of Hmong immigrants in Minnesota. The deaths are the first since the last measles outbreak in 1980. Though there are only 15,000 Hmong in the state, the Laotian tribesmen have contracted almost half of the state's 489 measles cases. The disease is common in Southeast Asia and researchers are trying to determine whether the Hmong are more vulnerable than other ethnic groups. Public-health agencies are offering clinics and door-to-door nurse visits. But many Hmong can't read warning notices and fear shots will give them the disease.
  • Future Shock In The Old West

    Am I nuts, or is Michael J. Fox getting smaller? Maybe it's just the cowboy outfits that he wears in Back to the future Part 111: stick Fox under a ten-gallon hat (well, say, eight) and the whole Fox configuration seems to dwindle, like a male Alice in Wonderland. Or maybe the series itself is dwindling (creatively, that is, not at the box office). In a way the BTTF movies are a contemporary version of the Alice books, with Wonderland becoming a dimension in time rather than in pure imagination. The first BTTF (1985), however, was an act of imagination--sweet, charming, witty, even wise. The adventures of Marty McFly (Fox) and his adorably bananas scientist friend Doc Brown (Christopher Lloyd), as they traveled back to Marty's past, put all sorts of spins on themes like kids, parents, pop culture, growing up and love. But BTTF II and now III are formula movies, whiz-bang rides in producer Steven Spielberg's titanically profitable amusement park. ...
  • One Step Closer To War

    He was the last moderate leader left in the Kashmir Valley. At Friday prayers, Moulvi Mohammed Farooq often criticized India's ironfisted administration of the I predominantly Muslim state. But he preached that Muslim and Hindu must live in peace. That was no protection. Farooq, 45, was alone in the early morning stillness of his house on Nagin Lake last week when three young men confronted him. Gunfire brought Farooq's family rushing to the scene, but his killers escaped. As secessionist fervor flared, at least 60 people were killed when Indian troops fired on chanting crowds bearing the rosecovered coffin through the capital, Srinagar. With another peacemaker out of the way, India and Pakistan moved a step closer to war.There aren't many such steps left. The two sides talk peace, but both are shopping for arms, NEWSWEEK learned. Another war over Kashmir--the last was in 1965--could be catastrophic. India has exploded a nuclear device and Pakistan is developing a bomb; both could...
  • Home Brew: Happening Hops

    It's the last culinary frontier, the long sought answer to what you drink with spaghetti from your home pasta maker and smoked chicken breasts from your home smoker. It's simpler than roasting your own coffee, cheaper than buying a vineyard and less hassle than moonshine. It's what Yuppies would drink on Fourth of July picnics, if they went to Fourth of July picnics. It's home brew, the beer you make yourself. ...
  • Women In Jail: Unequal Justice

    Californians call it The Campus, and with its low-lying, red-brick buildings set against 120 acres of dairy land, the California Institution for Women at Frontera looks deceptively civilized. The illusion ends inside. Constructed in the early 1950s as a repository for 800 or so wayward ladies, Frontera today holds more than 2,500 women at any given moment. The convicts complain that guards spy on them while they're showering or using the toilet. Inspectors have found rodent droppings and roaches in the food. In a lawsuit against the state, inmates charged that shower drains get so backed up, they have to stand on crates to avoid the slime. ...
  • Rabbit Rerun

    Most 50-year-old retired movie stars don't get a chance at a comeback. But last week Bugs Bunny began hopping up again. For the next year, before most regular feature films, theaters in the 1,700-screen AMC chain will show a vintage Looney Tunes short starring demicentenarian Bugs and his cohorts. AMC made the move after a poll revealed that what audiences wanted most--after concession stands with health food--was cartoons. Carrots are not for sale.
  • A Scapegoat On The Iowa?

    From the start, a strong odor of doubt hung over the Navy's official verdict that last year's disastrous explosion on the battleship Iowa was "most probably" set off by a suicidal sailor. Last week, prodded to act by a senator with new findings and a scientific report, the Navy said it would reopen its investigation--and disclosed the first solid evidence that the disaster may have been an accident after all. ...
  • New Fuel For The Intifada

    Days earlier, the commander of Israel's forces in the West Bank had pronounced the intifada "in retreat." But then a former Israeli soldier described by authorities as "deranged" opened fire on a group of unarmed Arab laborers near Tel Aviv, killing eight. The gunman, 21year-old Ami Popper, told investigators last week that his rampage was triggered by a shattered romance, not by politics. "An odious act of insanity," said Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir. But within hours of the shootings, Palestinians in the occupied territories swarmed into the streets, sparking the most violent rioting since the early days of the 30-month-on intifada. ...
  • In Defense Of Reagan

    It is time somebody said it: "Let's hear it for Ronald Reagan!" Count me in the chorus that gives George Bush a high approval rating, but don't include me among those who think being pro-Bush demands bashing Reagan. The current momentum of public and press opinion paints our former president less like the first since Ike to have served for two full terms and more like a deposed dictator who was forced upon us and whose yoke we finally have thrown off. Our public memory is mercilessly fickle. No wonder politicians lament, as did Montana's once powerful senator Burton K. Wheeler on his retirement, "Let 'em be ungrateful to someone else for a while."Not that Reagan has not made mistakes in retirement. He seems not to have acclimated to being an ex-president nearly so well as he acclimated to the presidency. Like actors, ex-leaders should avoid stepping on their successors' lines. Once the spotlight is turned to another, politicians are best served when their public does not see them,...
  • Too Little And Too Late?

    Small flurries of panic buying began even before Prime Minister Nikolai Ryzhkov delivered his speech. Then the flurries became a wave. Shoppers in Kiev raced from store to store last Friday, buying twice the usual amount of cooking oil, six times as much flour and eight times as much macaroni as they had purchased on an ordinary day. But those days ended abruptly when Ryzhkov made his announcement to the Soviet Parliament. The government proposed to double the price of food at the beginning of next year; bread prices would triple on the first of July. Angry miners spoke of a strike--possibly similar to the walkout that paralyzed Soviet industry last summer. Ukrainian Prime Minister Vitaly Masol vowed his republic would "stand in firm opposition" to the Moscow plan--and even Mikhail Gorbachev failed to give it much of an endorsement. Within a single day Ryzhkov was left vulnerably alone, pleading with the public for "restraint and calm." ...
  • It's Not Boring, It's High Concept

    ABC gets credit for renewing "'Twin Peaks," but blew it by nixing "Anything But Love." This is especially true given the interesting plots of next year's shows, including:(Zzz) Cop Rock, ABC A musical. Imagine cops inhaling jelly donuts, then bursting into arias. Bochco's chutzpah is appreciated, but c'mon.(Zzzzzzzzzzz) Baby Talk, ABC This spinoff of the uniquely dumb movie "Look Who's Talking" also features that comic impresario, Tony Danza, as the baby's voice.(Zzzzzz) Going Places, ABC "The Dick Van Dyke Show" was funny, but it had Dick Van Dyke. This one's about comedy writers writing a comedy show.(Zz) Fresh Prince of Bel Air, NBC Rapper plays a poor Philly kid dumped in moneytown. Sounds like "The Famous Teddy Z" with less Yiddish, more rhyming.PHOTO (COLOR): "Baby Talk'PHOTO (COLOR): "Fresh Prince'Subject Terms: TELEVISION programs
  • The Perils Of Condescension

    To be fanciful, suppose Democrats, having lost seven of 10 presidential elections since 1952, want to win in 1992. What should they do? They should begin by picking up (with two hands; it is heavy) Michael Barone's book "Our Country: The Shaping of America from Roosevelt to Reagan." They will learn such illuminating things as: The only book found on Adlai Stevenson's bedside table after his death (on a London street) was the Social Register. ...
  • Another Weapons Fiasco

    A mysterious Israeli weapons shipment that ended up in a Colombian drug lord's arsenal may have links to an aborted secret State Department effort to oust Manuel Noriega before the invasion. The curious tale is being unraveled by government investigators in Antigua, where the 500 Israeli weapons stopped in April 1989 before being transshipped to Colombia. The Israeli behind the shipment, mercenary Yair Klein, claims he was arming and training anti-Noriega exiles on Antigua. American intelligence officials deny any connection to the weapons that were found on the ranch of slain cocaine kingpin Rodriguez Gacha. But in May of 1988 the then assistant secretary of state Elliott Abrams ordered $1 million from a Panamanian escrow account given to the exiles. Antigua's defense chief says he checked about Klein's training school with the CIA and got clearance. One congressional source blames Abrams--who did not return NEWSWEEK'S calls--for failing to keep close tabs on the operation.
  • The Best Defense Isn't Free

    What Manuel Antonio Noriega Continues to learn about the strange ways of American justice! First, the United States Army swooped down on his Panama last December, guns ablazing, and spirited him away to a Miami jail cell. This was the kind of military operation that the renegade dictator could understand--perhaps even appreciate--although it could net him 165 years behind bars. But then Noriega got some surprises: he was presumed to be innocent, there would be no summary trial, he could demand certain information from the prosecution, he even received the fabled Miranda warnings. This system was pretty good. And early last week came news that would tickle an ironist and a deposed jefe The United States would pay his multimillion-dollar legal bills, at least until he had money of his own. Not such a bad country after all. ...
  • On Reform: Prime Time For Crime

    In the control room at Moscow police headquarters, lights on the wall map are flashing while Yuri Ivanov directs telephone traffic. "I used to be able to take naps on the night shift," says Ivanov, an operator on the night shift. "Not anymore." Tonight, there's only one murder: a report comes in about three women who buried a bloody 7-month-old infant by a creek in northeastern Moscow. Criminal investigator Vladimir Orlov and his team jump into a creaking old van and careen up to the site. "Democracy and all the changes in our society" are behind the current crime boom, says Orlov. "People don't i have any sense of control over themselves these days." ...
  • Marla Is Feeling Blue (As In Jeans)

    For a while there, Marla Maples was a decidedly sympathetic character. But now that she's used her other-woman status with Donald Trump to make a big killing, all bets are off. The Marla will earn an estimated $600,000 as the latest huckster--and symbol of true womanhood--for No Excuses jeans, the "A Current Affair" of clothing manufacturers. The aspiring model, who had previously shown real class by turning down offers to sell her story, now joins Donna Rice in the great pantheon of spurned but quite wealthy dates.
  • Buzzwords

    Want to start your own van line? Movers pack their own special patios: Chowder: Odds and ends, usually thrown into one box. Movers hate this stuff, they'd rather move a piano.Sticks: Furniture.Bedbug haulers: Drivers who truck household goods cross-country.O.S.: Overstuffed.Lumpers: Beefy guys who lug items between the house and the truck.Straight house: A one-story house.Blackjack: An upright piano. Tesselation: The art of packing a truck to fill every nook and cranny.
  • Out Of Bounds

    California Democratic gubernatorial candidate Dianne Feinstein, for shamelessly and endlessly exploiting the Hillside Strangler murders to win votes. The most recent example came last week in a debate with her opponent John Van de Kamp, the former state attorney general who did not prosecute for murder in the case. "I know how those women were killed. And I have visions of them bound, their mouths taped, spread-eagled, choked to death," Feinstein said at one point.
  • The Death Of Democracy

    The pictures looked like Japanese atrocities against the Chinese in the '30s--or Goya's images of war. In fact, they were supposed to represent justice, the summary justice dealt to protesters across China after the Democracy Movement massacre. Apparently to discourage new protests, police commissioned Chinese photographers and TV crews in one university town to document a public execution. As the first anniversary of the massacre approached, a photographer smuggled his film of the shootings last year to Paris. His photos showed the killing fields where the movement died. ...
  • Cabinet Edition

    The arrows on HHS chief Sullivan go up with each anti-smoking salvo; those of Attorney General Thornburgh and Education Sec. Cavazos are still headed downtown. ...
  • If You Don't Mind Bad Vibes...

    For $219,000, Reading Real Estate outside Boston is shopping "an immaculate home on a quiet street" that features three bedrooms, a spacious country kitchen, a pool and a hot tub. The only catch is, the house belonged to Chuck and Carol Stuart before the infamous husband allegedly killed his wife, then jumped off a bridge. The realty company isn't commenting on who the house belongs to. Although the killing did not occur at home, it would be wise to note that a California real estate agent was recently held liable for not telling a buyer that a multiple murder had occurred in the house she bought. Reading's concern is understandable: the crime is such a sensitive subject in Boston that the TV movie about it is being filmed in Chicago.
  • The Sound Of British Soul

    Her singing has the sultry, sophisticated soul smooch of a Whitney Houston or a Sade. But Lisa Stansfield, 24, is a white woman from the north of England, and she's exploded on British and U.S. pop charts like a Guy Fawkes' Day firecracker at the Apollo--where she recently aroused wild cheering. Stansfield, whose trademark is the whimsical kiss curl on her forehead, has no formal vocal training. But she does have a sly wit. "I think it's really cheeky," she says, "that we've taken American music, put our stamp on it and sold it back to the Americans." And the Yanks, far from being miffed, are turning the other cheek to the kiss-curl girl: Stansfield's first single, "All Around the World," shot up to number three on Billboard's "Hot 100" chart.
  • The Man With Two Brains

    After three quiet years, Scott Turow is back. This is launch week for his latest novel, "Burden of Proof," with a first printing of 800,000 copies. Come August, the film version of his 1987 thriller, "Presumed Innocent," starring Harrison Ford, will be out. (That book has sold 5 million copies, and the movie rights brought $1 million.) Now, on the eve of his new book tour, two pressing legal cases have come up that the workaholic author attorney can't--or won't--dish off to other lawyers in his office. It's shaping up to be another schizophrenic summer for the man with two souls. ...