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  • Coming Out Now

    For gay teens, life is better--and worse. They see more role models but AIDS is unrelenting. ...
  • Bring Back The Juvenile Delinquent

    Educational experts should realize that the goody-goody teens who reach their peak in high school these days only have weight problems, divorce and alcoholism in their future. It's the bad kids who healthily reject authority and suffer teen angst who build character and excel later in life. Unfortunately, few kids know how to rebel with class anymore. We no longer have juvenile delinquents--we have 13-year-old serial murderers. Somehow I doubt today's over-the-top hellcats will ever feel nostalgia for the good ole days of crack and "wilding." ...
  • This Year's Role Model

    There's no way around it: if you want to understand today's teenagers, you have to discover their heroes. Or, as the philosopher Joseph Campbell has pointed out, the people we admire are a reflection of our inner selves. Which isn't to say that pinpointing today's teen heroes is a Herculean task. Years of research have produced a scientific way of obtaining people's opinions about any number of things, heroes included. Yet in preparing this report, I didn't want to go that route. ...
  • The Patterns Of Abuse

    In a 1989 poll of seniors, 60% said they had drunk alcohol in the past 30 days; in 1980, 72% said they had. 17% of the 1989 seniors said they had smoked it once in the past 30 days; in 1979, 37% said they had.Between 1986 and 1989, the number of seniors using it decreased from 6.2% to 2.8%.Inner-cities use is still heavy, but overall use by high schoolers has fallen slightly since '87.
  • Against All Odds, I'm Just Fine

    What troubled times the American teenager lives in! Ads for Nike shoes urge us to "Just do it!" while the White House tells us to "Just say no." The baby boomers have watched their babies grow into teens and history has repeated itself: the punk teens of the '80s have taken the place of the hippie teens of the '60s. Once again the generation gap has widened and the adults have finally remembered to remember that teenagers are just no good. They have even coined a name for their persecution of adolescents: "teen-bashing." ...
  • Kids With Causes

    For a growing number of teenagers, the sentiment "I'm OK, who cares about you?" no longer prevails. Though there are no firm numbers on teen activism, many teachers and counselors predict a comeback. Granted, it's not yet a tidal wave of altruism. But in groups or on their own, teenagers are running recycling programs and peer hot lines, staffing soup kitchens and recording senior citizens' oral histories. Peter Scales, deputy director of the Center for Early Adolescence at the University of North Carolina, says, "The desire is there. We just have to tap into it." ...
  • Chance Of A Lifetime

    Aldo Gutierrez's chances of escaping the tough streets of south-central Los Angeles were no better than average. One of seven children born to Mexican immigrants, he was already a rebel and interested in gangs by the sixth grade. But at his elementary-school graduation, something astonishing happened: a wealthy California woman named Winifred Rhodes-Bea offered Aldo and his classmates a chance to escape the relentless cycle of early childbearing welfare and grinding poverty that often begins with dropping out. If they worked hard and stayed in school, Rhodes-Bea promised in the speech she delivered in the school auditorium, she would support them all the way--and pay for their college education. Aldo, now a ninth-grade scholarship student at Verbum Dei, a private Roman Catholic school, has turned his life around. "Before, I didn't really have any expectations. I used to be happy with a C," he says. "But now I want more than that." Hoping to become an engineer, Aldo will be--if all...
  • Stalking The Youth Market

    None dare call them sneakers. Sneakers is the kind of completely uncool word that parents use when they just refuse to understand. Little kids wear sneakers. Today's teenager wears what the trade calls "athletic shoes" or "fashion/casual footwear"--terms that you can stick a $150 price tag on. They are expressions of lifestyle. Tokens. ...
  • Work And What It's Worth

    Two or three days a week during the school year, 17-year-old Meta Smith headed directly from class to Mr. G's supermarket in Chicago. From 3 to 8 p.m. she bagged groceries, rang up sales and served cold cuts in the store's deli. Then she headed home for a night of homework before jumping into bed--and waking up at 6 the next morning to begin the routine anew. Her motivation: m-o-n-e-y. Most weeks, Meta earned about $90, which she used to buy make-up, clothes, jewelry and lunches. Says she: "So far it's the best job I've had." ...
  • A Much Riskier Passage

    There was a time when teenagers believed themselves to be part of a conquering army. Through much of the 1960s and 1970s, the legions of adolescence appeared to command the center of American culture like a victorious occupying force, imposing their singular tastes In clothing, music and recreational drugs on a good many of the rest of us. It was a hegemony buttressed by advertisers, fashion setters, record producers suddenly zeroing in on the teen multitudes as if they controlled the best part of the country's wealth, which in some sense they did. But even more than market power, what made the young insurgents invincible was the conviction that they were right: from the crusade of the children, grown-ups believed, they must learn to trust their feelings, to shun materialism, to make love, not money. ...
  • The New Rules Of Courtship

    It used to be simpler. When the parents of today's teenagers were kids the rules of attraction were clear, logical, precise. Boy liked Girl. Girl liked Boy. Boy asked Girl out. Boy spent the next five months trying, often against all hope, to score. Boy, despite embarrassing failure, lied to his friends and said he scored anyway. Back then, before Prince and all that disco unpleasantness, even the most pathetic black-socks-in-gym-class loser could find someone to go out with. ...
  • Facing The Alternatives

    Only half of sexually active teen women surveyed reported contraceptive use at first intercourse. Only 17 percent used the pill. Almost all teen pregnancies--5 out of 6--are unintended.About 40 percent of teenage pregnancies end in abortion.They account for 26 percent of all abortions performed in the United States.
  • Highs And Lows

    Grace Slick grew up in Palo Alto, Calif, the daughter of an investment banker. She attended Finch College (along with Tricia Nixon) and in 1966 joined the Jefferson Airplane. Her first album with the band Surrealistic Pillow sold 2 million copies and Slick's song, "White Rabbit," with its famous last lyric, "Feed your head," became an anthem of the psychedelic generation. Dubbed the "Acid Queen" by the press, she was said to have "the voice that launched a thousand trips." Eventually, though, it was her drinking that caught up with her. She is now a recovering alcoholic and lives in Mill Valley, north of San Francisco, with her husband, Skip Johnson. Her daughter, China, by Airplane founder Paul Kantner, is now a VJ-- video jockey--on MTV. ...
  • How Many? How Bad?

    teenagers in the United States have become pregnant every year since 1973. Put another way, that's 1 out of 10 girls, ages 15 to 19, getting pregnant every year.An estimated 93 percent of the nation's high schools offer some form of sex education.
  • Prom Night Isn't What You Think

    In the movies, prom night is the night when all teenagers discover true love. In Mother's memory chest, it is the night immortalized by a dusty picture of a young girl and her long-forgotten sweetheart. In the boys' locker room it is the night for which all the girls have been saving their virginity. ...
  • Tales Of A Mother/Confessor

    My own adolescent rebellion came late. Somewhere around the age of 35. I don't recommend waiting till then. Better to drag your parents through it than your kids. I was the good child in our family. My job was to be happy, to make up for my brother, who wasn't. Even as a teen, I gave my parents little trouble. I told them only what I thought they wanted to hear. I kept the rest to myself. I played my role well, but it took its toll. My rashes were famous all over town. My aunt called me Camille. ...
  • Don't Expect Me To Be Perfect

    I am a 16-year-old Korean-American. My family has been in the United States for six years now. I'll be a junior next fall. ...
  • 1984 Michael Jackson Tour

    After months of anticipation, Michael Jackson's troubled and controversial tour has finally kicked off in Kansas City and the enigmatic star is living up to his reputation as the reluctant Pied Piper of pop.
  • Using Drugs to Fight Autism

    Brian Pingree was a beautiful child, but his mother knew something was terribly wrong. For hours, the three-year-old would sit rocking back and forth aimlessly, oblivious to his brothers and sisters who played nearby. When Carmen Pingree hugged and kissed her son, he would stiffen and turn his face away. He rarely spoke, and when he did, his voice had the flat tone of a science-fiction robot. Although he could open latches and locks with uncanny ease, he had trouble using a fork. Mrs. Pingree later learned that Brian was autistic, the victim of the most bizarre and complicated of all childhood disorders. Until recently, it was also the most misunderstood by doctors and psychologists. According to classical Freudians, autism was a severe emotional disease caused by the mother's unconscious rejection of her baby. Some experts considered autistics irredeemably retarded and urged that they be institutionalized, while others suggested that these children were schizophrenic and should be...
  • Michael Jackson: The Peter Pan of Pop

    It's a giddy and glamourous sound, Hands clap, horns blare. A carnival of percussion erupts. Electric guitars chatter like a corps of African talking drums. A voice gasps and then chants a chorus. So go the first few seconds of "Wanna Be Startin' Somethin' " six minutes of musical frenzy from a new Epic album called "Thriller." The show-stopping style could come from only one star—Michael Jackson.
  • Why Kennedy Withdrew From 1984 Race

    Stressing 'an overriding obligation' to his three children, he folds the tents of Camelot—at least for now. His surprise withdrawal fronm the Democratic race sets off a fierce scramble for the '84 nomination.
  • Autism: It May Be A Genetic Defect

    The autistic child lives in a bizarre world known only to him. He may rock aimlessly back and forth, flap his hands in front of his face or twirl on his toes like a dervish. He may hear some sounds, but ignore others. He may learn to talk, then abruptly stop speaking altogether. For decades specialists regarded autism, which affects at least 300,000 children in the United States, as a severe psychological disorder. Now most authorities consider it to be a physical problem, perhaps caused by neurological defects. And last week a California psychiatrist presented statistics suggesting that the brain damage may be inherited or congenital.Dr. Edward R. Ritvo of the University of California, Los Angeles, studied autistic children from 230 families. In the test group, he told a meeting of the National Society for Autistic Children in Boston, Ritvo found 25 pairs ofidentical twins; in all cases both of the twins were autistic. Among eighteen sets of nonidentical twins, two pairs were both...
  • Kennedy Enters 1980 Presidential Race

    Quite early one morning last week, a familiar figure in a sober business suit stepped from the door of his home on the Virginia side of the Potomac. Blinking for a moment in the bright sunlight, he slid into the passenger seat of a blue 1971 Oldsmobile convertible and headed for the United States Senate. As the car inched through Washington's rush-hour traffic, he asked the driver to put the top down. Suddenly a construction worker at the side of the road caught sight of his curly dark hair and Boston Irish jaw. "Hey, Mister President?" the man yelled, and when everyone started waving, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy broke into a grin as broad as Back Bay. Turning to the reporter in the back seat, he asked cheerfully, "Have you got that down?" No one missed the message. After more than a year of diplomatic evasion and political feinting, Teddy Kennedy laid down an unmistakable challenge to Jimmy Carter last week. Dropping his longstanding endorsement of the President, Kennedy announced that...
  • Ted Kennedy’s Advisers

    It is part of the Camelot mythology that if Teddy Kennedy runs for President, old knights of the realm would drop everything and rally to the last brother—everyone from Arthur Schlesinger and John Kenneth Galbraith to Ted Soren-sen and Larry O'Brien. Not so. While the Kennedy name would be sure to attract plenty of political and academic celebrities, a Teddy-for-President campaign would be more likely to feature a new generation of the best and the brightest. Kennedy has several pools to draw from. Veterans from Bobby Kennedy's 1968 campaign, such as Frank Mankiewicz and Fred Dutton, would be available for part-time counsel. So would academics like MIT president Jerome Wiesner, Harvard Prof. Abram Chayes and Yale Prof. Burke Marshall. But Kennedy's hard-core troopers would almost certainly come from the top levels of his Senate office and committee staffs, an inner circle of heady and sometimes brash young men thoroughly committed to Kennedy and his programs. "Most of his people are...
  • Ted Kennedy and Health Care Reform 1979

    NEWSWEEK Washington correspondent John J. Lindsay talked with Sen. Edward Kennedy last week about his new plan for national health insurance and about the broad problems of medical care in the U.S. Some excerpts: ...
  • Kennedy and Carter in 1980 Race

    In the crystal-lit Senate Caucus Room, where his two elder brothers began their quests for the Presidency, the Last Kennedy proposed a revolutionary womb-to-tomb health-insurance plan for all Americans last week and dared Jimmy Carter to join him. His challenge and his choice of theaters set Washington chattering yet again that Sen. Edward M. Kennedy must be gearing up to take the Democratic nominanation away from Carter in 1980. The senator, in public and private, uttered his usual rote denials. But this time they were shadowed by the quickening spread of a dump-Jimmy, draft-Teddy insurgency in the provinces—and by the wakening belief among Kennedy's most senior political advisers whether he wants to or not. What Kennedy offered was a vote-now, pay-later program expending Federal health benefits for the needy and mandating private insurance for everybody else (following story). By his estimates, the plan would add $28.6 billion to the budget and would cost employers and employees ...
  • Ted Kennedy Presidential Nomination

    He arrives on Capitol Hill: tires burn, car windows drop, heads pop out and yell, "Hey, Teddy! Give 'em hell!" He strides the Senate corrdors at his habitual half-lope: his progress becomes a parade, the tourists scrambling, reaching, touching, firing flash-cubes like Roman candles. He and Sen. Henry M. Jackson, the nominal Democratic favorite for President, pay separate calls on a United Auto Workers regional conference in a Washington motel. Hardly anybody notices Jackson till his hosts, embarrassed, begin tugging delegates forward to say hello. But noncandidate Edward Moore Kennedy has to fight his way in and out of the room, through thickets of grown-up trade-union pros clawing for handshakes, jostling for pictures, begging for autographs on anything from matchbooks to dollar bills. Teddy is the one who turns them on—the single incandescent presence, excepting only George Wallace, in the lack-luster Democratic Presidential politics of 1976. He has taken himself out of the...
  • Other Voices: How Social Scientists See Women’s Lib

    Radical battlers for women's rights have always roused strong reactions in scientists and social critics. Among the eminent minds of the past, John Stuart Mill considered feminists the vanguard of humanity while Horace Walpole dubbed them "hyenas in petticoats." Now that female emancipation is half-realized, contemporary thinkers polarize more benignly. At one extreme are sympathetic critics who bless many of the aims and ideas of the women's liberation movement but not all its tactics. At the other are amused or exasperated foes who contend that the ladies just don't know what they are talking about.In the friendlier group are several prominent social scientists, including anthropologist Margaret Mead and sociologist David Riesman. Miss Mead believes that many traits we call masculine and feminine are merely inherited stereotypes. Like spokesmen for women's lib, she proposes that men share child-rearing and domestic chores and that women be encouraged to learn aggressive, masculine...
  • Ted Kennedy Car Accident in Chappaquiddick

    With that mumbled response in a crowded Edgartown, Mass., courtroom last week, the last Kennedy broke a week's pained and damaging silence on the night that changed his life—and moved to short up the last tottering towers of Camelot. He had spent his longest week closeted with kinsmen and advisers against a gray drizzly chill that blanketed Hyannis Port, wondering whether his and his family's claim on the Presidency of the U.S. had died in the auto accident that killed Mary Jo Kopechne. The decision to plead guilty was the easiest part of the strategy they worked out—an utterly routine deal in which Teddy took a two-month suspended sentence and averted a potentially messy trial. The critically hard second step came some 10 hours later when Kennedy went on television before and estimated 35 million Americans with an extraordinary confession that he had fled in panicky confusion from a crisis—a flight he himself judged "indefensible"—and threw himself on the mercy of the only jury...
  • Robert Kennedy Shot, Killed in Los Angeles

    With sickening familiarity there was the same fell scene all over again—the crack of the gun, the crumpling body, the screams, the kaleidoscopic pandemonium, a voice that cried, "Get a doctor! Get a doctor!" and another that wailed in anguish, "Jesus Christ! Oh, Jesus Christ!" and then trailed off in a series of broken sobs.Thus in Los Angeles was Robert Kennedy cut down by a bullet in the brain, the third great U.S. leader to die at the hand of an assassin in less than five years. And there was in Kennedy's death a chilling completeness—a fulfillment he himself seemed to understand and even to expect. Beneath all the wealth and Camelot glamour, the Kennedy family record was a catalogue of ill fortune: the violent deaths of Joe Jr., Kathleen, and finally Jack; the sister born hopelessly retarded, the stroke that lamed and silenced patriarch Joe Sr., the plane crash that nearly dispatched Ted. John Kennedy's death particularly seemed to haunt Bobby, even as he set out to re-create...
  • A flame Burned Fiercely

    From the time of his brother's assassination, the mission was never in doubt; one day he would try to regain the lost Presidency. Most people simply assumed it; one close friend put it quite plainly: "Anyone who has gone to the President's grave…with Robert Kennedy gets the sense that he feels that something great was broken here, and that as his brother's brother he has an obligation to continue it."But at first the obligation seemed more apparent than the desire. A score of interviewers asked him when he would make the race—1968? 1972? Each heard a version of the same distracted reply: "I don't even know if I'm going to be here." An aide elaborated: "Bob just feels it's futile to plan too much. He has a visceral sense of the precarious nature of human life and effort."Campaigning at last, he seldom seemed far from this somber mood.  There were all the exhilarated images of the final weeks; Bobby Kennedy rolling down a dozen Main Streets to a dozen courthouse squares in the Midwest...
  • Remembering Robert F. Kennedy

    Once again, the flags slid down to half-staff. Once again, a starlit and star-crossed family came together to mourn its fallen. Once again, a Presidential jet called Air Force One streaked homeward across a continent, its cargo the body of a vital young man of unqualified promise and uncompleted destiny.Once again, the queues wound past the coffin, and once again Washington paused in sadness for a state funeral procession wending toward Arlington's slopes. With a terrible symmetry, a lone assassin struck down Robert Francis Kennedy last week, and once again a nation was left to watch and grieve and wonder.Death came to Kennedy just as he was celebrating the latest victory of his run to reclaim the Presidency his brother has lost—a run that had already helped force Lyndon Johnson's abdication and now, in California, had eked out a win over rival dissenter Eugene McCarthy. He died not as President but as pretender, felled not in the bright sunshine but in the gloom of a dingy serving...
  • Robert Kennedy Wins Indiana Primary

    The winner in an election is still the man who gets the most votes. And by that standard, Robert Kennedy, who held an 11 point margin over Gov. Roger Branigin and 15 points over Sen. Eugene McCarthy, won the Indiana primary.By the same token, when a man finishes third out of a field of three, he is the clear loser. McCarthy lost in Indiana. It is nonsense for the Minnesota senator to play the game that he could have won in a two way contest with Kennedy alone. The final NEWSWEEK Poll, which was taken on the eve of the primary, showed that in a two-way race Kennedy would have overwhelmed McCarthy by 61 to 39 percent.But in the end Bobby's Indiana victory was far from overwhelming. For all his own earlier poor-mouthing, the first full survey for NEWSWEEK, conducted two weeks before balloting, showed Bobby solidly ahead with an indicated plurality of close to 50 percent. But in the last 5 days he began to slip, and his final total came to rest at 42 percent.To a degree, Kennedy was...
  • How Bobby Kennedy Won the '68 Indiana Primary

    He swept into Indiana with a lean and hungry look—a Kennedy in search of a convincing candidacy. For four punishing weeks, he crisscrossed thousands of miles of Hoosier heartland, offering his person to the rolling mobs of teeny-boppers—and a new, toned down rhetoric to the inscrutable voters. He brought his mother and his brother, his wife, a sister-in-law, even his Irish cocker spaniel, Freckles. The campaign cost him a cracked front tooth, countless cufflinks and perhaps upward of $1 million. And when the votes were counted in the Democratic primary last week, Indiana was grudging in its rewards. But Robert F. Kennedy did what he had to do in his first major test as a Presidential candidate: he finished first.By the standards of John F. Kennedy's 1960 West Virginia triumph, Bobby Kennedy's performance in Indiana fell short of a breakthrough, but it was a victory, none the less. Facing off against Eugene McCarthy and Gov. Roger Branigin, Indiana's favorite son, Kennedy led the...
  • A Newly Serious John F. Kennedy Is Sworn In

    His face deep-tanned by the Florida sun, his step springy as a watered golf green and sure as the ocean surf, and yet his whole mien somehow sobered and aged by the imminence of grave responsibility, John Fitzgerald Kennedy prepared this week to swear his solemn oath of office as the 35th and—at the age of 43—youngest elected President of the United States. The new Chief Executive had lost none of his restless energy, or the sudden flash of his eyes, or the spontaneity of his laughter. But much of the brashness of young Jack Kennedy, the cocksure candidate, had vanished, and in its place was a new seriousness, a palpable sense of the awesomeness of his position that well became John F. Kennedy, the President. Where once he had relied confidently on Kennedy wit, wealth, charm, and pluck, he now publicly asked the guidance of God, and the support of a united nation. He had won the free world's most powerful and responsible office largely by questioning the policies of his predecessor...