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  • Home Brew: Happening Hops

    It's the last culinary frontier, the long sought answer to what you drink with spaghetti from your home pasta maker and smoked chicken breasts from your home smoker. It's simpler than roasting your own coffee, cheaper than buying a vineyard and less hassle than moonshine. It's what Yuppies would drink on Fourth of July picnics, if they went to Fourth of July picnics. It's home brew, the beer you make yourself. ...
  • Women In Jail: Unequal Justice

    Californians call it The Campus, and with its low-lying, red-brick buildings set against 120 acres of dairy land, the California Institution for Women at Frontera looks deceptively civilized. The illusion ends inside. Constructed in the early 1950s as a repository for 800 or so wayward ladies, Frontera today holds more than 2,500 women at any given moment. The convicts complain that guards spy on them while they're showering or using the toilet. Inspectors have found rodent droppings and roaches in the food. In a lawsuit against the state, inmates charged that shower drains get so backed up, they have to stand on crates to avoid the slime. ...
  • Rabbit Rerun

    Most 50-year-old retired movie stars don't get a chance at a comeback. But last week Bugs Bunny began hopping up again. For the next year, before most regular feature films, theaters in the 1,700-screen AMC chain will show a vintage Looney Tunes short starring demicentenarian Bugs and his cohorts. AMC made the move after a poll revealed that what audiences wanted most--after concession stands with health food--was cartoons. Carrots are not for sale.
  • A Scapegoat On The Iowa?

    From the start, a strong odor of doubt hung over the Navy's official verdict that last year's disastrous explosion on the battleship Iowa was "most probably" set off by a suicidal sailor. Last week, prodded to act by a senator with new findings and a scientific report, the Navy said it would reopen its investigation--and disclosed the first solid evidence that the disaster may have been an accident after all. ...
  • New Fuel For The Intifada

    Days earlier, the commander of Israel's forces in the West Bank had pronounced the intifada "in retreat." But then a former Israeli soldier described by authorities as "deranged" opened fire on a group of unarmed Arab laborers near Tel Aviv, killing eight. The gunman, 21year-old Ami Popper, told investigators last week that his rampage was triggered by a shattered romance, not by politics. "An odious act of insanity," said Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir. But within hours of the shootings, Palestinians in the occupied territories swarmed into the streets, sparking the most violent rioting since the early days of the 30-month-on intifada. ...
  • In Defense Of Reagan

    It is time somebody said it: "Let's hear it for Ronald Reagan!" Count me in the chorus that gives George Bush a high approval rating, but don't include me among those who think being pro-Bush demands bashing Reagan. The current momentum of public and press opinion paints our former president less like the first since Ike to have served for two full terms and more like a deposed dictator who was forced upon us and whose yoke we finally have thrown off. Our public memory is mercilessly fickle. No wonder politicians lament, as did Montana's once powerful senator Burton K. Wheeler on his retirement, "Let 'em be ungrateful to someone else for a while."Not that Reagan has not made mistakes in retirement. He seems not to have acclimated to being an ex-president nearly so well as he acclimated to the presidency. Like actors, ex-leaders should avoid stepping on their successors' lines. Once the spotlight is turned to another, politicians are best served when their public does not see them,...
  • Too Little And Too Late?

    Small flurries of panic buying began even before Prime Minister Nikolai Ryzhkov delivered his speech. Then the flurries became a wave. Shoppers in Kiev raced from store to store last Friday, buying twice the usual amount of cooking oil, six times as much flour and eight times as much macaroni as they had purchased on an ordinary day. But those days ended abruptly when Ryzhkov made his announcement to the Soviet Parliament. The government proposed to double the price of food at the beginning of next year; bread prices would triple on the first of July. Angry miners spoke of a strike--possibly similar to the walkout that paralyzed Soviet industry last summer. Ukrainian Prime Minister Vitaly Masol vowed his republic would "stand in firm opposition" to the Moscow plan--and even Mikhail Gorbachev failed to give it much of an endorsement. Within a single day Ryzhkov was left vulnerably alone, pleading with the public for "restraint and calm." ...
  • It's Not Boring, It's High Concept

    ABC gets credit for renewing "'Twin Peaks," but blew it by nixing "Anything But Love." This is especially true given the interesting plots of next year's shows, including:(Zzz) Cop Rock, ABC A musical. Imagine cops inhaling jelly donuts, then bursting into arias. Bochco's chutzpah is appreciated, but c'mon.(Zzzzzzzzzzz) Baby Talk, ABC This spinoff of the uniquely dumb movie "Look Who's Talking" also features that comic impresario, Tony Danza, as the baby's voice.(Zzzzzz) Going Places, ABC "The Dick Van Dyke Show" was funny, but it had Dick Van Dyke. This one's about comedy writers writing a comedy show.(Zz) Fresh Prince of Bel Air, NBC Rapper plays a poor Philly kid dumped in moneytown. Sounds like "The Famous Teddy Z" with less Yiddish, more rhyming.PHOTO (COLOR): "Baby Talk'PHOTO (COLOR): "Fresh Prince'Subject Terms: TELEVISION programs
  • The Perils Of Condescension

    To be fanciful, suppose Democrats, having lost seven of 10 presidential elections since 1952, want to win in 1992. What should they do? They should begin by picking up (with two hands; it is heavy) Michael Barone's book "Our Country: The Shaping of America from Roosevelt to Reagan." They will learn such illuminating things as: The only book found on Adlai Stevenson's bedside table after his death (on a London street) was the Social Register. ...
  • Another Weapons Fiasco

    A mysterious Israeli weapons shipment that ended up in a Colombian drug lord's arsenal may have links to an aborted secret State Department effort to oust Manuel Noriega before the invasion. The curious tale is being unraveled by government investigators in Antigua, where the 500 Israeli weapons stopped in April 1989 before being transshipped to Colombia. The Israeli behind the shipment, mercenary Yair Klein, claims he was arming and training anti-Noriega exiles on Antigua. American intelligence officials deny any connection to the weapons that were found on the ranch of slain cocaine kingpin Rodriguez Gacha. But in May of 1988 the then assistant secretary of state Elliott Abrams ordered $1 million from a Panamanian escrow account given to the exiles. Antigua's defense chief says he checked about Klein's training school with the CIA and got clearance. One congressional source blames Abrams--who did not return NEWSWEEK'S calls--for failing to keep close tabs on the operation.
  • The Best Defense Isn't Free

    What Manuel Antonio Noriega Continues to learn about the strange ways of American justice! First, the United States Army swooped down on his Panama last December, guns ablazing, and spirited him away to a Miami jail cell. This was the kind of military operation that the renegade dictator could understand--perhaps even appreciate--although it could net him 165 years behind bars. But then Noriega got some surprises: he was presumed to be innocent, there would be no summary trial, he could demand certain information from the prosecution, he even received the fabled Miranda warnings. This system was pretty good. And early last week came news that would tickle an ironist and a deposed jefe The United States would pay his multimillion-dollar legal bills, at least until he had money of his own. Not such a bad country after all. ...
  • On Reform: Prime Time For Crime

    In the control room at Moscow police headquarters, lights on the wall map are flashing while Yuri Ivanov directs telephone traffic. "I used to be able to take naps on the night shift," says Ivanov, an operator on the night shift. "Not anymore." Tonight, there's only one murder: a report comes in about three women who buried a bloody 7-month-old infant by a creek in northeastern Moscow. Criminal investigator Vladimir Orlov and his team jump into a creaking old van and careen up to the site. "Democracy and all the changes in our society" are behind the current crime boom, says Orlov. "People don't i have any sense of control over themselves these days." ...
  • Marla Is Feeling Blue (As In Jeans)

    For a while there, Marla Maples was a decidedly sympathetic character. But now that she's used her other-woman status with Donald Trump to make a big killing, all bets are off. The Marla will earn an estimated $600,000 as the latest huckster--and symbol of true womanhood--for No Excuses jeans, the "A Current Affair" of clothing manufacturers. The aspiring model, who had previously shown real class by turning down offers to sell her story, now joins Donna Rice in the great pantheon of spurned but quite wealthy dates.
  • Buzzwords

    Want to start your own van line? Movers pack their own special patios: Chowder: Odds and ends, usually thrown into one box. Movers hate this stuff, they'd rather move a piano.Sticks: Furniture.Bedbug haulers: Drivers who truck household goods cross-country.O.S.: Overstuffed.Lumpers: Beefy guys who lug items between the house and the truck.Straight house: A one-story house.Blackjack: An upright piano. Tesselation: The art of packing a truck to fill every nook and cranny.
  • Out Of Bounds

    California Democratic gubernatorial candidate Dianne Feinstein, for shamelessly and endlessly exploiting the Hillside Strangler murders to win votes. The most recent example came last week in a debate with her opponent John Van de Kamp, the former state attorney general who did not prosecute for murder in the case. "I know how those women were killed. And I have visions of them bound, their mouths taped, spread-eagled, choked to death," Feinstein said at one point.
  • The Death Of Democracy

    The pictures looked like Japanese atrocities against the Chinese in the '30s--or Goya's images of war. In fact, they were supposed to represent justice, the summary justice dealt to protesters across China after the Democracy Movement massacre. Apparently to discourage new protests, police commissioned Chinese photographers and TV crews in one university town to document a public execution. As the first anniversary of the massacre approached, a photographer smuggled his film of the shootings last year to Paris. His photos showed the killing fields where the movement died. ...
  • Cabinet Edition

    The arrows on HHS chief Sullivan go up with each anti-smoking salvo; those of Attorney General Thornburgh and Education Sec. Cavazos are still headed downtown. ...
  • If You Don't Mind Bad Vibes...

    For $219,000, Reading Real Estate outside Boston is shopping "an immaculate home on a quiet street" that features three bedrooms, a spacious country kitchen, a pool and a hot tub. The only catch is, the house belonged to Chuck and Carol Stuart before the infamous husband allegedly killed his wife, then jumped off a bridge. The realty company isn't commenting on who the house belongs to. Although the killing did not occur at home, it would be wise to note that a California real estate agent was recently held liable for not telling a buyer that a multiple murder had occurred in the house she bought. Reading's concern is understandable: the crime is such a sensitive subject in Boston that the TV movie about it is being filmed in Chicago.
  • The Sound Of British Soul

    Her singing has the sultry, sophisticated soul smooch of a Whitney Houston or a Sade. But Lisa Stansfield, 24, is a white woman from the north of England, and she's exploded on British and U.S. pop charts like a Guy Fawkes' Day firecracker at the Apollo--where she recently aroused wild cheering. Stansfield, whose trademark is the whimsical kiss curl on her forehead, has no formal vocal training. But she does have a sly wit. "I think it's really cheeky," she says, "that we've taken American music, put our stamp on it and sold it back to the Americans." And the Yanks, far from being miffed, are turning the other cheek to the kiss-curl girl: Stansfield's first single, "All Around the World," shot up to number three on Billboard's "Hot 100" chart.
  • The Man With Two Brains

    After three quiet years, Scott Turow is back. This is launch week for his latest novel, "Burden of Proof," with a first printing of 800,000 copies. Come August, the film version of his 1987 thriller, "Presumed Innocent," starring Harrison Ford, will be out. (That book has sold 5 million copies, and the movie rights brought $1 million.) Now, on the eve of his new book tour, two pressing legal cases have come up that the workaholic author attorney can't--or won't--dish off to other lawyers in his office. It's shaping up to be another schizophrenic summer for the man with two souls. ...
  • Phony Smokes From Cuba

    The capitalist spirit is alive in Cuba. Last week three men were convicted in Miami of smuggling cigarette-manufacturing equipment into Cuba in order to make counterfeit Winston cigarettes. Documents seized in the arrest indicate let the counterfeiters planned to make $2.1 million from the operation. U.S. Customs officials say that, in order to get the fakes off the market, the R J. Reynolds Tobacco Co. bought up all 90,000 counterfeit cartons in Holland. The officials say Winston was the only brand faked because the counterfeiters were working with a former RJR engineer who knew how to duplicate that blend.
  • Mommy Vs. Mommy

    Tension between mothers is building as they increasingly choose divergent paths: going to work, or staying home to care for their kids ...
  • Assault Weapons: A Setback For The Nra

    Only the day before, the National Rifle Association was confidently predicting a victory and the gun-control forces were bracing for defeat. Yet when the fight was over, the Senate had voted to ban nine types of assault weapons from the U.S. market. Champagne corks poped for the biggest gun-control triumph in years on Capitol Hill, and Sarah Brady, who has become the movement's most prominent speaker since her husbands near fatal wounding in the 1981 assassination attempt on Ronald Reagan, was exultant. After its "devastating, huge loss," she said, the NRA has turned into "a paper tiger." ...
  • An Idyllic Life Of Crime

    Dreamlike Fryburg, Calif., is America's bicycling capital. It's also home to a bunch of mobsters, plunked down in paradise by the federal witness-protection program. In "My Blue Heaven," due in July, Steve Martin is Vinnie Antonelli, a relocated crook who sets up shop in Fryburg without fear of prosecution. One crime he doesn't commit: dressing to kill. Vinnie clearly never saw Steve Martin's classic "Dead Men Don't Wear Plaid."
  • You Are What You Buy

    The scene: the kitchen of Elizabeth Makkay, shopper and mother of three in Putnam Valley, N.Y. For nearly two hours, consumer snoop Allison Cohen has probed the depths of Makkay's shopping psyche--and the contents of her cabinets, refrigerator and medicine chest. Her mission: to categorize consumers' shopping styles and determine their response to a new line of products called President's Choice. Video camera rolling, she spots a preponderance of store-brand and discounted merchandise. But, oh, what's this? A bag of President's Choice "Decadent" cookies, a jar of President's Choice peanut butter and a bottle of President's Choice barbecue sauce. Cohen has seen Makkay's type before. "Definitely shopping involved," she declares. "A terrific candidate for "The Price Is Right'." ...
  • Christo's Latest

    Some people are going to say Japan is living up to its picky, no-fun stereotype. Christo, the Bulgarian-born artist who wrapped in fabric Paris's landmark bridge, Pont Neuf, five years ago, is planning to string 1,300 blue umbrellas across a Japanese valley and 1,700 yellow ones in California. But Japan, unlike California, has taken a regulatory stance and is requiring enough documentation to fill a Yellow Page-size binder. Christo, no stranger to red tape, is finding the Japanese overly fussy. But then, maybe wind-testing a 450-pound umbrella isn't such a bad idea.
  • How Do Planes Differ From Buses?

    Guaranteeing that small children ride in safety--whether by airliner or school bus--hardly sounds like a controversial cause. Yet efforts to translate that desire into federal regulations have raised two hotly debated questions. Who should pay for the extra safety measures and would their costs really be worth their presumed benefits? ...
  • Boesky Washes His Dirty Linen In Public

    For four years Ivan Boesky has been Wall Street's unseen villain. Under wraps, then behind bars, the former takeover speculator implicated some of the biggest names in the financial markets by giving secret testimony before federal grand juries. Boesky's singing led to guilty pleas of securities violations by, among others, Drexel Burnham Lambert and junk-bond king Michael Milken. Finally last week Boesky, 53, materialized, testifying in public for the first time since he copped a plea to insider-trading schemes. ...
  • Keep Holding Your Breath

    For nine years, every time the Clean Air Act of 1970 came up for renewal, Congress managed to duck. It just couldn't resolve wrangles between lawmakers looking out for the interests of the automobile and other industries and those more concerned with cleaning up the muck that passes for urban air. While Congress contented itself with simply extending the old law, much of the nation's air got dirtier on several measures, and half the population now breathes unhealthy air. But even Congress can't ignore burning lungs forever, and last week the House voted overwhelmingly to strengthen the act. Besides mandating reductions in acid rain and airborne toxics, the bill will affect what's put into the tanks of America's 178 million vehicles. Trouble is, these provisions may not do enough to clear the air. ...
  • Neither Ally Nor Enemy

    We have no eternal allies, and we have no perpetual enemies," Lord Palmerston said in the House of Commons in 1848. "Our interests are eternal and perpetual." In their dealings with Soviet leaders, Americans have generally disregarded that cynical but sound advice. We swing from one extreme to another, from false hopes to angry disappointment. At one moment, we see an eternal friend; at another, a perpetual enemy. Now more than ever, the Soviet Union is neither-and we need to do better in identifying our permanent interests. ...
  • Sit Down, Taxpayers

    It's official: the S&Ls are in even worse shape than the government told you. Last week Treasury Secretary Nicholas Brady confirmed independent reports (NEWSWEEK, May 21) of ballooning bailout costs. He admitted to Congress that the taxpayers' tab for the thrift crisis could be as much as $130 billion--about 75 percent higher than estimates announced just last August. Budget director Richard Darman warned that the numbers were "just very, very much larger than the budget system is designed to handle." ...
  • Global Effort

    Margaret Thatcher is going to break ranks with the United States, Canada and the Soviet Union by calling for a stabilization of carbon-dioxide emissions at current levels by 2005. The British prime minister's decision came after she reviewed a report by the respected Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change, which concluded that emissions resulting from human activities "are substantially increasing" concentrations of greenhouse gases, thus leading to increased global warming. Emissions would have to be reduced by more than 60 percent to stabilize concentrations in the atmosphere, the report says.
  • This Is Big. Reeeeally Big.

    For years, the goal in computing has been to make things smaller, building down from early room-size monsters to today's palmtop PCs. Even computer terms--like "bit" and "microprocessor"--connote tininess. Now The Computer Museum, Boston's repository of vintage number-crunchers and intriguing interactive exhibits, has gone the other way: a really, really BIG computer, two stories tall. It boasts keys a foot across, six-foot-wide disks and--get ready for this oxymoron--the biggest microchip in the world, 7 1/2 feet square. The WalkThrough Computer, a new permanent exhibit modeled after such displays as the walkthrough human heart at Chicago's Museum of Science and Industry, will give visitors a chance to see the soul of a new machine close up. No wonder the museum is calling the June 21 unveiling "the biggest event in computer history." Steve Jobs, eat your heart out. ...
  • Russia's Champagne Taste

    A historical irony pervades "From Poussin to Matisse: The Russian A Taste for French Painting" at New York's Metropolitan Museum of Art. The old masters wound up in the Soviet Union largely because Russian noblemen, with the purchasing power of contemporary Japanese, prowled France to buy up art dispersed by the Revolution. The modern paintings in the exhibition came mostly from the collections of two turn-of-the-century bourgeois Muscovites who were ahead of the French themselves in appreciating the likes of van Gogh and Matisse. Then, in 1918, the Bolsheviks nationalized the lot--all of which they dismissed as decadent capitalist nonsense. The result? Splendid paintings, old and modern, preserved in two stately museums--the Hermitage in Leningrad and Moscow's Pushkin. This show, the latest in a series of art exchanges prompted by the 1985 Reagan-Gorbachev summit, draws on the Soviet state collections to give a picture of the Russian passion for French culture. There is a great,...
  • Autarky: A New Challenge

    Richer than Saudi Arabia: that's what people in the trans-Urals region of Tyumen say they could be if allowed to sell their oil themselves. It is worth about $37 billion a year, and Moscow takes virtually all of it. In Yakutia, Siberian diamond and gold prospectors are of a similar mind: they're agitating for control of their own mines. And in a move that provoked outcry in Moscow, the Uzbek Council of Ministers passed a law prohibiting consumer goods from being sold outside the republic. ...
  • David Lynch's New Peak

    When you're hot you're hot. Even before David Lynch walked off with the Cannes Film Festival's top prize the Palme d'Or, for his flammable new film "Wild at Heart," Lynchmania had infected the Cote d'Azur. Each Thursday night during the festival, the American Pavilion threw a "Twin Peaks" party (serving pie and a good cup of black coffee) for crowds of "Peak" addicts who, ignoring the hundreds of new movies unreeling around them, preferred to huddle in front of TV monitors watching tapes of the latest episode from the United States. The first screening of "Wild at Heart"--at 8:30 in the morning--was so eagerly anticipated that the 2,400-seat Grand Auditorium Lumiere was half full of sleepy souls by 8. When the film ended, with the Elvis-like Nicolas Cage atop a car crooning "Love Me Tender" to Laura Dern, the audience broke into wild cheering. After a steady diet of lugubrious and sometimes immobile films from around the world, Lynch's lurid comic melodrama was a blast of freshly...
  • A Fine Mess

    The long census nightmare continues. As if census takers haven't already had enough difficulty getting people to cooperate, they now have a credibility problem. In Houston, con artists posing as census takers have been trying to fine people $50 for not turning in their forms. The scheme was discovered when a real census worker making routine checks of nonfilers was told by several people, "Oh, an enumerator already came by wanting to collect that fine." The Census Bureau, by the way, does not fine people for not reporting. Meanwhile, in Iowa, an overzealous census worker was suspended for violating confidentiality rules after he told police he smelled marijuana in a person's home.
  • Why He's Failing

    After nearly five years in office, Mikhail Gorbachev is a brilliant failure. His mastery of Soviet politics is almost complete; his grip on power seems rock-solid for the foreseeable future. But Gorbachev is failing in a more fundamental sense. He has been unable, so far, to achieve his principal goal: to save the Soviet system from itself. He has started a revolution in his homeland and beyond, but he is not even close to finishing it. ...
  • 'Dear Mommy, How Are You Doing?'

    It is Mother's Day at the Lorton Correctional Complex outside Washington, D.C., and Michael, 10, is waiting impatiently as the women in camouflage pants file into the gym. Finally, Jennifer Nimmons, who is serving 18 months on a drug charge, arrives and Michael rushes into her arms. He has brought his mother a present: a cutout of a dancing bear with a letter on its stomach, which he reads aloud. "Dear Mommy, How are you doing in the hospital? Have a happy mother's day, this is a poem for you. 'Roses are red, Violets are blue, You are the best mother, I ever wrote to.'" Then he asks: "Is this a hospital?" ...
  • For Sale: The Shuttles

    In the midst of all the recent turmoil in the airline industry, there always seemed one steady, profitable business--the Northeast shuttle services. Whether owned by Eastern, Pan Am or Donald Trump, the shuttles have been viewed as highflying cash cows. Operating in the Boston-New York-Washington corridor, their passengers are almost all business travelers whose companies seemed unfazed by ever-increasing fares. "It's like owning a cable-TV company," observes Paul Turk. an airline consultant. "There's not much competition and you can move prices without affecting traffic much." ...
  • The Bad News Bears

    When the stock market talks, everybody listens--even the frowning bad-news bears. The Dow Jones industrial average hit a new high in May, and most of the pessimists beat a retreat. Individual investors have been piling into stocks since December by buying stock-owning mutual funds. That may be bad news. Market lore says the public is always wrong. ...
  • A Deadline For A Divorce

    Canadian Prime Minister Pierre, Trudeau surveyed the results of Quebec's referendum on independence and pronounced the separatism movement in his native province dead. But on the night of that defeat a decade ago, Rene Levesque who had led the raucous rebellion that brought Quebec to the brink of secession, took a different view. "A la prochaine, " he said. Until the next time. ...
  • Holding A Bad Hand

    What's the matter with Mikhail Gorbachev? Never has a leader of the Soviet Union looked so weak coming to a summit with an American president. In Moscow, political upstarts to his right and left openly ridicule him. The Baltic States are trying to peel away; as many as four more Soviet republics may follow. After five years of tinkering with the economy, he has fixed too little, too late; but more radical reforms promise inflation and unemployment--and the danger of strikes and food riots. Gorbachev's opponents are too weak to topple him. Yet, even as he tightens his grip on the government, the government loses control over the country. ...
  • Togetherness

    For the record, the Kryptonite Corp. has not come out on either side of the abortion debate. But that hasn't stopped anti-abortion protesters from using the world's toughest bicycle locks to keep police from dragging them away during sit-down protests. The right-to-lifers are locking themselves to clinics, cars or anything else that will let them obstruct traffic longer. Kryptonite is reporting increased calls from police departments asking how to thwart the locks. The best solutions: get a locksmith to drill out the cylinders or employ gigantic Jaws of Life cutters used for auto wrecks.
  • Are Teens Tv Smart?

    Robert Pittman, one of the creators of MTV, thinks teens today are an audience best spoken to in pictures. "TV babies seem to perceive visual messages better" than previous generations did, Pittman wrote in a recent New York Times editorial. "They can 'reed' a picture or understand body language at a glance." ...
  • Teens And Tv

    Teenagers between the ages of 12 and 17 watch TV an average of 22 hours a week. That means they spend about 3 hours a day in front of the tube. Ads consume 3 to 4 hours--about 20%--of TV watched per week.The more TV teens watch, the lower their writing ability; in one study, 17-year-olds who watched 6 or more hours of TV per week scored about 10 percent lower on a writing test than did those who watch only 2 hours per week.
  • The Push For Sex Education

    In the past few years, many communities have tried various initiatives aimed at preventing teen pregnancy. No single approach works for every child or every school, but experts say that the most effective measures consist of a combination of education, health care and--most important--strong parental support. ...
  • The Unhealthy Facts Of Life

    By March 1990 the Centers for Disease Control had counted 1,429 cases of AIDS among teenagers. Although teenage AIDS cases account for only 1% of the nation's total, the number of cases doubles every 14 months.More teenagers get the AIDS virus heterosexually than do adults.National statistics on chlamydia are not available, though experts in various locales report that between 7% and 40% of female teens have been infected.The syphilis rate for teens age 15-19 has jumped 67% since 1985.Condom use among teenagers doubled between 1979 and 1988.
  • The Dangers Of Doing It

    Street wisdom drives 16-year-old Meta Jones crazy. Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are at record-high levels among teens, yet the kids Meta knows at Coolidge Senior High in Washington D.C., have more faith in superstition than science. "They believe in the 'quick-withdrawal method'," she says. "They think you can't catch anything if he pulls out quickly enough." A lot of boys don't worry, she says, because "they think it's the girls who catch [diseases] more easily." And everyone seems to think STDs are someone else's problem. "They say, 'We're young. This isn't going to happen to us'." ...
  • Anatomy Of A Fad

    Teen Trends Follow Their Own Elusive Grapevine, Fed By Mass Media And Peer Pressure
  • High School Homeroom

    Cambridge Rindge and Latin School is only blocks from Harvard Yard, but it is really a world apart. The only public high school in Cambridge, Mass., Rindge and Latin's student body is a cross section of the city behind the privileged university. Nearly 70 flags hang from the ceiling of the cafeteria, representing the national origins of the 2,100 students. The day begins early here just before 8 a.m., when the streets in front of Rindge and Latin begin to fill up with kids. Some are chatting with friends, others hear only the rhythms of their Walkmans. Even amid this diversity, a few students stand out. They are girls like Charlene. unwillingly trapped in a time warp between adulthood and youth. ...
  • That's No Way To End A Good Life

    Last night as I was lying awake in bed, I thought about suicide--my own suicide. I had just told my best friend's boyfriend that I wanted him to go out with me, not her. I know this doesn't seem like a very good reason for killing yourself, but there was more to it. I had asked him to go out with me only because I didn't want him to invite her to the prom. I didn't do it because I like him--I did it because I couldn't stand the thought of him stealing her away from me. I felt awful for having betrayed my friend. ...
  • Coming Out Now

    For gay teens, life is better--and worse. They see more role models but AIDS is unrelenting. ...
  • Bring Back The Juvenile Delinquent

    Educational experts should realize that the goody-goody teens who reach their peak in high school these days only have weight problems, divorce and alcoholism in their future. It's the bad kids who healthily reject authority and suffer teen angst who build character and excel later in life. Unfortunately, few kids know how to rebel with class anymore. We no longer have juvenile delinquents--we have 13-year-old serial murderers. Somehow I doubt today's over-the-top hellcats will ever feel nostalgia for the good ole days of crack and "wilding." ...