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  • Criminal Justice System

    When we enter the cell in Bilibid Prison, a group of inmates suddenly disperses. They had been hunching over something. We now see it is what seems to be a little girl dressed in scanty garments. She stands up, ashamed. Her eyebrows are drawn in large, swooping arcs. Her fingernails and toenails are painted maroon. "Isn't this a prison for male inmates only?" we ask our guide, a worker from the Philippine Jesuit Prison Service. "That is a boy," she says. The child stands up, adjusting his garments. We have apparently interrupted a scene of molestation. "This is the whole problem."The diversity of problems in the Philippines is both remarkable and depressingly familiar--from a flat-footed economy to Muslim terrorists in the south to thick layers of official corruption. But almost all the country's ills can be traced back to a fundamental lack of justice. That sense reaches its starkest expression in places like Bilibid, 15 kilometers outside Manila. In the Philippines, children as...
  • Why Not Saddam

    Saddam Hussein's jets streak across the Iraqi night, challenging American fighters to give chase. His SAM batteries, more effective now than at any time since the gulf war, probe the skies with radar, ready to fire. Often they do; so far they've missed. But the heat is on in the no-fly zones patrolled by the United States and Britain above northern and southern Iraq. New provocations and retaliations erupted again last week: in the most intensive bombing raids since February, about 20 U.S. and British warplanes attacked a military-communications center, a SAM site and a long-range-radar installation. Between air-strikes, President George W. Bush explained that Saddam was "still a menace, and we need to keep him in check, and will."In check? How about in jail? Slobodan Milosevic awaits trial at The Hague, and former Rwandan officials are on the stand in Arusha, Tanzania. Cambodia is gearing up for a war-crimes tribunal, and the former Chadian dictator Hissene Habre faces extradition...
  • Finding The 'Next' Netheads

    One of the iron laws of the Information Age is that every time somebody lays down an iron law of the Information Age, it turns out to be 180 degrees off the mark. Early on, futurists predicted that the computer would lead to the paperless office. Now we are swimming in more paper than ever. Techno-enthusiasts have long predicted that the Internet would upset old hierarchies, empowering the geek rebel and weakening the corporate fat cat. But we are not living in an age of toppled hierarchies and decentralization of power. On the contrary, there is a great wave of consolidation wherever you look--in banking, media, airlines, the automotive sector. Think AOL Time Warner. Think DaimlerChrysler. Even in the high-tech sector, a few giants dominate: Microsoft, Intel, Amazon, Nokia and so on.Most important, young people--the ones who grew up with the Internet--are not rebels and free agents. On the contrary, they are incredibly--even disconcertingly--comfortable with authority. Public...
  • Perspectives

    "I have made this decision with great care, and I pray it is the right one." George W. Bush, announcing that he will allow limited federal funding for stem-cell research"This will come as a great surprise to my ex-wife, three sons, ex-girlfriends and whomever the future ex-Mrs. Leach might be." "Lifestyles of the Rich and Famous" host Robin Leach, on a controversial New York Times crossword puzzle that he said implied he was gay"The street was full of blood." Sarit Barashy, who was shopping nearby when explosives were set off in a Jerusalem pizzeria, killing the suicide bomber and 15 others"It doesn't rise to the level of a Mt. Vernon or a Monticello, but it does have a place in Americana." Robert Sahagian, on his court fight to preserve the childhood home of Jay Leno, which is set for demolition this week"He thought it was a good thing to do, considering the weather." Sgt. Mark Blanchette, on arresting a man who went to a gas station and filled up his SUV in the buff"I will not...
  • When We Were Kings

    Bill Murray is working the room: enter at your own risk. It's a drizzly morning in New Jersey, and director Wes Anderson is shooting "The Royal Tenenbaums," a comedy due in December about one deeply eccentric family's attempt to survive divorce, heartache, the '70s and each other. A vast old WPA building has been transformed into a hospital, and between takes Murray rambles around the set. He pretends to scold Gwyneth Paltrow ("Hey, are you in character?"), then pretends to comfort Ben Stiller ("You're our rock. You gotta keep it together"). He pretends to be furious with the soft-spoken director ("Bill?" "What?! You're riding us too hard, Wes!"), then complains to producer Barry Mendel that Anderson's turned into a gonzo taskmaster like the man who directed "Pearl Harbor" ("Hey, Barry, who died and made him Michael Bay?"). In a quiet moment Murray reflects on his chances of winning an Oscar someday. "My only hope's a Hersholt award," he says. "It's a humanitarian thing. I gotta...
  • Out Of Tune

    It's not hard to see why the ingredients of Louis De Bernieres's novel "Corelli's Mandolin" looked like surefire movie material. Set on a beautiful Greek island torn apart by World War II, this darkly satiric epic has comedy, drama, a love story, occupying armies of amiable Italians and nasty Nazis, horrific war scenes and an earthquake to boot. On-screen, adapted by Shawn Slovo, directed by John ("Shakespeare in Love") Madden and rechristened "Captain Corelli's Mandolin," all these goodies are crammed into an overproduced jumble that searches vainly for a proper tone.Not surprisingly, the movie emphasizes the love triangle between the beautiful Pelagia (Penelope Cruz), who's the daughter of a local doctor (John Hurt), and the two men who love her--a fisherman turned partisan (Christian Bale) and the captain of the occupying Italian forces, the humanistic, music-loving Corelli (Nicolas Cage). Problem is, every role is miscast. Whose idea was it to have the boyishly British Bale play...
  • L.A.'S Master Of Colors

    As the comedian Rodney Dangerfield might put it, Los Angeles don't get no respect... at least in terms of the history of modern art in America. The city has always been considered a distant second--maybe even third, after Chicago--to New York. Gotham hosted the groundbreaking Armory Show in 1913, enjoyed a whole Greenwich Villageful of avant-garde painters and poets in the 1920s and was the birthplace of abstract expressionism in the '40s. But do you know that L.A. was home to a painter (Knud Merrild) who dripped way before Jackson Pollock did? Or that Andy Warhol had his first gallery solo show in L.A., not New York? Or that the first American modern-art "ism" (synchromism) was the brainchild of an artist who--except for some neophyte years in Paris and a brief, disappointing layover in New York--spent his whole long, rich career in the Big Orange? You'll realize that last one--joyfully, in spades--if you can catch "Color, Myth, and Music: Stanton Macdonald-Wright and Synchromism"...
  • Is This The Party To Whom I Am Speaking?

    Want to flesh out your resume? A job at Rotterdam-based telemarketer Telesales may be just the thing. "Always Wanted to Work in the Nude?" it recently advertised, trying to lure hard-to-find staff. "In an office job like a call center," the Dutch company explains, "it doesn't matter what you're wearing because customers don't see you." This select team will operate under the name Au Nature Telesales. Not to worry. Applicants don't have to interview naked. "We are not a sex-line center. And we have no erotic demands at all," insists co-owner Robert van Sligter. "We [just] want everybody in our office to feel pleasant and free."
  • Losing Maureen

    The moon is waning, but it's still round and bright enough to turn the night silver. I am waiting for the phone call that is now inevitable. It will be my mother telling me that my sister, Maureen, has died. We have all been waiting--family members in different cities--knowing that her death is imminent. We have respected Maureen's wishes, and those of her husband and daughter--letting them have these last days and hours to themselves. She wanted to devote what little strength she had left to them. So, we wait, and pray, and watch the sky a lot.We are, technically, half sisters, sharing the same father. This, I think, made us wary of each other. We both clamored for more of him and his approval, and blamed each other when we felt we didn't get enough. I didn't understand that before, in the years of distance and tension, but I do now. It must have been very hard for her to watch her parents divorce, to watch her father begin a new family and hold another daughter in his arms. Many...
  • Overexposed

    Skin Cancer: With Temps Rising, So Are Rates Of This Deadly Disease. How Scientists Are Hunting For New Treatments--And Better Approaches To Prevention.
  • Give Peace A Chance

    Two Northern Irelands were in the news last week. Dominating the front pages: the battered peace process, forever caught in the punch-up between good news and bad. Back on the business pages, a different story unfolded. A luxury Ramada hotel opened its doors in Belfast--part of a sustained construction boom that belies the city's skewed image as a war zone alight with burning police Land Rovers. Real-estate prices continued to climb, well ahead of inflation; retail rents were rising faster in Belfast than anywhere else in Britain except London. A Confederation of British Industry survey found that Northern Ireland was one of only two places in the United Kingdom that would not lose jobs this year.Pay attention to those business stories. For all the hand-wringing about disarmament and the fate of their elected Assembly, which was temporarily suspended last weekend, the people of Northern Ireland have mostly moved beyond the Troubles that consumed them for nearly three decades. There...
  • Be Productive-Hit The Beach

    These are the dog days of August, and in this hot, sweltering weather most Americans are busy working. (I know, I know, not you folks in the Hamptons.) Meanwhile, most Europeans are busy vacationing. Thus it has ever been, only it's getting worse. Nowadays the average European gets about three times as many days of paid vacation as his counterpart in America. Why do we do this to ourselves?The conventional answer is that this attitude toward work makes the American economy the envy of the world. America has a hectic, turbo charged system that builds, destroys and rebuilds, all at warp speed. It's what created the information revolution, Silicon Valley, hedge funds, biotechnology, nanotechnology (whatever that is) and so on. And there's no time in it for lolling on the beach, buddy!But there's now some dispute about just how productive the American economy has been. Last week the Commerce Department released a slew of figures that have economists chattering. It turns out that the...
  • Newsmakers; Crazy Like A Foxx

    Not since David Letterman introduced Oprah to Uma has the viewing public been subjected to such a horrendous hosting performance. At last year's MTV Video Music Awards, the Wayans brothers offered up very few laughs, just mean-spirited gags poking fun at the very stars the broadcast was designed to honor. But Jamie Foxx, who'll host this year's show Sept. 6, insists his joshing will be kinder and gentler. (We just hope it's funnier.) "A lot of stars are going through some serious things right now," he says. "I don't want to make fun of them. I want them to get out of rehab." But fear not, the always unceremonious ceremony will still feature those two MTV mainstays: sin and skin. "Even I'm going to be naked," he says. "It's going to be me in pasties and open-toed cowboy boots. Am I hoping anyone else strips? Well, I'm always hoping." Aren't we all?They Drive a Hard Bargain Acting at 6 months, producing at 6 years and full-fledged media moguls by 15. While most of their peers are...
  • Romancing New Readers

    In "See Jane Date," a soon-to-be published novel, the heroine is a 28-year-old Manhattan publishing assistant who dreams about DKNY sweaters, frets about her hip measurements and goes through men almost as fast as she goes through Marlboro Lights. She spends her weekends drinking cosmopolitans at trendy TriBeCa bars and fantasizes about her Pierce Brosnan-esque boss. But even though the book is being published by Harlequin Enterprises Inc., the reigning champion of supermarket trash, there are no Fabio look-alikes, wealthy cowboys or amnesiac brides anywhere within its 284 pages."See Jane Date" represents the cheeky new face of the $1.4 billion romance industry. In an effort to seduce younger readers, romance publishers are expanding into the exploding "chick lit" genre. The new titles aim to surf the commercial wave created by Penguin's "Bridget Jones's Diary," a British import that sold more than a million copies in the United States and spawned a recent hit Miramax film. The...
  • Mail Call

    Many readers weighed in on our July 16 story about the U.S. controversy over stem-cell research. Some were deeply troubled by the use of fetal cells for science while the majority supported federal funding. One reader insisted Roman Catholics must follow the teachings of the pope and noted, "It isn't always easy or popular to do the right thing." But another argued, "Which is better, to discard these precious gifts from God, or to use them for the betterment of mankind?" The Stem Cell Wars As a pro-life woman with Parkinson's disease, I read with interest your article on stem-cell research ("Cellular Divide," U.S. AFFAIRS, July 16). I was a bit dismayed by your implication that anyone with this disease would automatically be in favor of stem-cell treatment. I am grappling with a number of questions about this issue. For instance, what will happen if we run out of fertilized eggs to harvest for stem cells? Do we create more? What about looking more closely into using the placenta? I...
  • Internal Affairs

    So, Bubba has his $12 million book deal. Should bookstores stack it under fiction or nonfiction? Clinton once said: "It depends on what the meaning of the word 'is' is," but now insists the book will be "setting the record straight." Still, maybe best to simply stack it under biography.Elsewhere, the American Bar Association backed a rule prohibiting lawyers from having sex with clients. No word as to whether a similar law will be considered by politicians.Copyright 2001 Newsweek: not for distribution outside of Newsweek Inc.
  • Don't Get Burned!

    Who's signing up for high-speed Internet access these days? People like my mom, who recently became one of the 7.5 million Web users who got tired of slow connections and signed up for broadband. Last month she tossed out her old modem and subscribed to cable Internet access through Cox@Home in San Diego. She's 59, retired and an avid golfer. She sends the occasional e-mail but mainly uses the Web to manage her investment portfolios. A typical user, in other words. So I asked her if she had installed a personal firewall on her PC. "No," she said. "How do you do that?" Sigh. My own mother!High-speed connections present an easy target for hackers because they are "always on," thus giving mischief-makers more time to find you and attack your PC. Even though hard numbers don't exist, the hacker threat is real. Security experts estimate that there are a couple thousand elite hackers around the world, of the sort skilled enough to have created the Code Red II worm that infected 200,000...
  • Movies Under The Moon

    Toting bagfuls of snacks and drinks, a small crowd gathers on a swath of patchy grass beside New York City's East River. Seats are staked out with blankets and coolers. Conversation tapers off when a pinkish-red sunset envelops Manhattan's skyscrapers across the river, triggering a click, a whir and the flicker of celluloid on a large screen mounted on a trailer. This evening's offering at the Socrates Sculpture Park in Queens: "Wattstax," a 1972 documentary about an L.A. concert that captured the broiling racial tension of the era. Against a darkening sky, a young Jesse Jackson leaps out from the screen leading chants of "I am somebody!" The orange glows of cigarettes (some tobacco, some not) dot the audience like fireflies. Madhavi Me-non, a 31-year-old restaurant worker, explains the allure: "It's the feeling of the great outdoors," she says, "and experiencing a sense of community."Watching movies and sitting under the stars have always been two of summertime's greatest pleasures...
  • Cyberscope

    Be careful who you trust," warns Majestic, the online adventure that blurs the lines between fact and fiction by twinning gameplaying with everyday methods of communication (free demo, then $9.99 per month; majestic thegame.com). Intended for adults, Majestic uses e-mail, fax, voice mail, instant messaging and the Internet to send you messages and clues about a government conspiracy in which one person is dead and more will follow. You try to save them by unraveling the hints and searching out answers using Majestic's search engine, linked to thousands of real and specially created conspiracy sites. Played in real time, Majestic decides when it is ready to proceed; players will sometimes wait hours for the next critical message. Depending on your fancy, you may find the lulls boring, but others will find it a gut-wrenching thrill.STUFFPower Your Gadgets Anywhere Under the Sun In a mobile, wireless world, batteries are the weakest link. But some tech companies are applying an ancient...
  • Rediscovering The Old East

    Getting there is half the fun. My convertible blasts along ancient, tree-lined country lanes, through fields of rye ripening under a Curacao-blue sky. Nothing could be farther away from the metropolitan frazzle of Berlin than the wide-open Pomeranian countryside, three hours north of the capital. Past rolling hills and through dusty medieval villages, the road ends at the dock of a small passenger ferry. Across a narrow channel of the Baltic Sea lies a long, low strip of land, reachable only by boat. No cars allowed. Hiddensee is an island time forgot.Preserved under the glass bubble of communism until German reunification a decade ago, the place is just as it was in the '20s, when Thomas Mann and Albert Einstein summered in its thatched-roof cottages. No roads, motels, neon signs--nothing but a few simple villages, winding bike paths and sandy walking trails. Even in midsummer, its beaches are deserted.A decade after the fall of the wall, Germany's old East is drawing visitors...
  • The Disc That Saved Hollywood

    You'd think that, at 64, the decidedly dated Snow White would be headed for retirement. Disney has milked $1.1 billion out of the perky princess since "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" first arrived in 1937, rereleasing the movie eight times in theaters for each successive generation, and then selling millions of videotapes in two "limited" releases. Nonetheless, Disney is going to the wishing well again. On Oct. 9, "Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs" arrives on a next- generation DVD, and Disney CEO Michael Eisner is hoping that one bite of this apple will make shareholders forget all about "Pearl Harbor" and Disney's California Adventure. Two years in the making, "Snow White" the DVD is 15 hours of digitally compressed entertainment offered up in four different languages and jammed onto two silvery, CD-size discs.There's a "making of" documentary, an interactive Dopey game and an original recording of "Some Day My Prince Will Come" by Barbra Streisand. You can take a virtual tour of...
  • Prozac Pipeline

    The banner ad flashes like a neon marquee in Ginza: PROZAC... PROZAC... PROZAC. The tag line reads: "If you don't know about this you're behind the times." The Web site linked to the ad, run by a company with no obvious name or address, is one of hundreds that offer Japanese consumers mail-order drugs from overseas. They peddle everything from herbal elixirs to diet pills to St. John's wort. But their bread-and-butter trade is in "lifestyle" antidepressants, chiefly Prozac, Paxil and Zoloft.This unregulated trade stems from a loophole in Japan's drug laws. While pharmaceutical products developed overseas must undergo extensive (critics say redundant) clinical trials prior to commercial sale in Japan, ordinary Japanese can buy almost anything for their own use. Typically, pharmaceuticals reach the Japanese market five to 10 years after they've appeared in the West. Prozac, an extreme example, debuted in Belgium in 1986 but won't arrive in Japan until 2003 at the earliest. Web-based ...
  • Not A Thought Of Damnation

    It's a question you asked over 200 years ago, Napper, but I'll tell you how Ireland stands in the year 2001. There was a time well into the 20th century when Irish writers looked over their shoulders for fear of the church, the censor and a tyrannical priggishness. The likes of James Joyce and Sean O'Casey escaped to the Continent and England, respectively. Others were vilified and simply driven from town and country: Brinsley MacNamara, John McGahern, Edna O'Brien. It was almost a mark of honor to have your work banned, and most Irish writers were so honored.But all is changed in Ireland: Mother Church is going through an agonizing reappraisal, the Irish censor hardly knows what to do with his idleness and priggishness is as rare as chastity.If you'd been in Dublin on June 16 this year, you might have observed people parading through the streets in garb more appropriate to the year 1904. Many a tourist wondered if he/she had gone into a time warp--but there was an explanation, and...
  • 'My Life Has Been Full Of Narrow Escapes'

    As a kid, John McCain loved playing in the sun. Like his fair-haired, fair-skinned friends, he'd roast himself red, hoping a rich tan would follow the blisters. Years later, in the early '90s, he paid the price: skin cancer. He had it treated quickly, but it recurred last year, amid the chaos of the presidential campaign. Now, after a round of painful surgeries, McCain is free of signs of the disease--though the chance it could recur is never far from his mind. For the first time, the senator and his wife, Cindy McCain, spoke with NEWSWEEK about his battle against cancer--and how it affected his life and his family. ...
  • What Happened To Irish Art?

    Rain beats down on W. B. Yeats's grave in Drumcliffe, but still the faithful come. As the guide talks of the Irish poet's death in 1939, a tall professorial type nods solemnly. Japanese tourists in dripping red Windbreakers grin gamely for the camera. Until a few years ago, literary pilgrims to Ireland could find shelter from the rain in an old stable, where a local woman would serve tea and homemade Guinness cake. Today, tourists flock to the stout new visitors' center, built two years ago with funds from the European Union. There, they can hunt for information on Irish writers at the computer center, sign up for the audiovisual tour and buy Celtic fridge magnets, Yeats pens or Irish tin whistles, complete with their own instructional CDs.Yeats, who declared "romantic Ireland's dead and gone," would have been bemused. His country's astonishing economic success during the past decade, built on the IT boom and huge tax breaks for foreign companies, jacked up the GDP by 11.5 percent...
  • The Age Of Navel Gazing

    Close your eyes and try to picture Britney Spears with her navel covered. Can't do it, right? That's because you've never seen it covered. That's because it never has been. Say this much for the young siren, though: she has helped liberate that six-inch swath of skin below the bra and above the belt for every X-chromosomal American, no matter how old, no matter what shape.Navels are nothing new--scientists say we've had them at least since Madonna's "Like a Virgin" world tour--but this summer they're everywhere. On billboards. In the workplace. Singing in a commercial for Levi's. "Isn't it nice?" says Daniella Clark, founder of the high-end Los Angeles boutique Frankie B., whose "low-cut" jeans sales have jumped from $1.5 million last year to $7 million so far in 2001. "We get tons of e-mails from boyfriends and husbands thanking us." There's even a hot accessory called the Bel-ly Light that blinks red or green, depending on your mood. High schools are starting to institute "no...
  • In Search Of The Gods

    Azov is hardly the kind of place where most people would look for adventure. Life is slow in this postcard-pretty Russian town on the delta of the muddy river Don. No one has bothered to tear down the statue of Lenin in the main square. Azov used to be a busy port. But that was before the river's channel shifted, leaving the town in sleepy solitude.Until Thor Heyerdahl showed up. Half a world and more than half a century away from the route of his famous Kon-Tiki expedition, the Norwegian explorer is pursuing the most wildly ambitious quest of his life. Conquering the Pacific on a balsa raft was kid stuff. This time his goal is nothing less than to find Asgard, the fabled home of the Vikings' gods. Its remains, he believes, are here in Azov, buried eight meters or more underground. Most experts on Norse history stop just short of calling the whole idea insane. But Heyerdahl, 86, is so confident, he has put up $100,000 of his own money in search of Asgard.His dream began when he was...