Newswire

Newswire

  • This Economy Won't Walk

    Yup. But It May Not Be Quite As Crippled As You've Been Led To Believe.
  • Sugarcoated Hostility

    During World War II, when the army psychiatrist Col. William Menninger first coined the term "passive-aggressive" to refer to insubordinate soldiers who ignored and resisted orders, little did he think that this unwieldy, seemingly contradictory phrase would make its way into the mainstream. Today, passive aggression is everywhere, from the boardroom to the bedroom, at home and in the office, and especially in the "cold wars" between the sexes. Everyone, it seems, is at least a little bit passive-aggressive, and the label has become part of our psychological lexicon. ...
  • Beating the Odds in Biotech

    You might think Elliott Hillback would be a little wary. It's been a rough year for biotech in the stock market. Industry shares took a pounding which knocked away a third of their value, and the upheaval left a string of crippled firms. Yet the company Hillback works for, Genzyme, is building a fancy new $85 million production plant in Boston. Hillback's bet: "We are at the very edge of the very beginning of this business." ...
  • BUZZWORDS

    Grab your guns, America. Hunting season has begun--and defenseless animals beware. A shot to the heart-best because it kills quickly.A spot where male deer gather, usually in high country.When you hit a bird and it flies 100 yards before falling.A young doe, which has no antlers.A bare-necessities hunting camp with no running water. One with running water.
  • ON PARNASSUS FOR 15 MINUTES

    Considering that writers are basically people who sit alone in a room somewhere, there's always been a surprising appetite for their life stories. Lately readers don't even demand major flameouts like Ezra Pound or best sellers of yesteryear like Dickens. Relatively few people now read, say, Jean Stafford except under professorial duress, yet trade publishers have issued two Stafford biographies since 1988. Maybe it's just another sign of the times. On the supply side we've got an academic world in which criticism has been shanghaied by post-structuralist and p.c. crazies, leaving biography as a vehicle for rational literary discourse. On the demand side we've got upscale ex-college students, conditioned by the culture's obsession with celebrity gossip, who'd rather read about writers than confront their actual writing. Of course, it never hurts if a biographer's subject boozes and ... whatever the non-gender-specific equivalent of "wenches" is. ...
  • Home, Home on the Train

    For decades, old railroad cars have provided shelter for homeless people-until the cops kicked them out. Now Dan Sweat --coordinator of the Atlanta Project, Jim my Carter's campaign against poverty-has a clever solution: turn old boxcars into shelters for the homeless. Sweat and other activists for the homeless plan to divide Atlanta's unused cars into dormitory-style rooms. Kitchens and bathrooms will be at the center of the 41-foot cars, which will be arranged into a village with a railway theme. The CSX Transportation Co. has donated 21 boxcars-and says up to 1,000 more may be available.
  • Take My Comedy Routine. Please.

    Fifteen minutes of fame is 15 minutes of bean( funny is even better. Now, a new invention that's one part Japan and two parts Catskills lets anyone go boffo--or bomb-like a Jay Leno. Stand Up To Go weds the mass appeal of karaoke and the bewildering popularity of comedy clubs, freeing closet borscht belters to be kings and queens of comedy for a day. ...
  • ET, PHONE US

    NEXT WEEK NASA'S MOST POWERFUL RADIO TELESCOPES WILL BEGIN SEARCHING FOR SIGNALS FROM ALIENS. BUT NOW THAT WE'RE LISTENING, IS ANYONE OUT THERE TO CALL?
  • Hidden Horrors In Sudan

    The letter was smuggled out of Juba in southern Sudan last summer. "Lucky are the people in Yugoslavia and Somalia, for the world is with them," it said plaintively. "It may be a blessing to die or get killed in front of a camera, because the world will know." The world is well informed, and properly appalled, about "ethnic cleansing" in Bosnia and the mass starvation caused by civil strife in Somalia. At a time when humanitarian horrors are competing for the world's attention, southern Sudan is the site of an unseen tragedy. ...
  • And Now, Doctored Files?

    The FBI, NEWSWEEK has learned, has opened an investigation into allegations that someone tampered with Bill Clinton's passport file at the State Department. For weeks, news organizations have been chasing an unsubstantiated rumor that Clinton, as an anguished young Rhodes scholar faced with the draft, considered applying for citizenship in some other country. Three-two newspapers and a television network-filed Freedom of Information Act requests with the State Department seeking Clinton's passport file from the late '60s and early '70s. When State officials pulled Clinton's file late last week, they discovered that it had apparently been tampered with-that several pages seemed to have been ripped out. The FBI was immediately brought in to investigate. ...
  • Anatomy Of A Fire

    Norman Maclean got many good reviews for "A River Runs Through It," but none pleased him more than the letters he got from fishermen. "There's no bastards in the world who like to argue more than fishermen," he once said, "and not one of them corrected me on anything. That is my idea of a good review." ...
  • Hello, Barbie? Shut Up.

    Barbie better button up her lip. That's what the American Association of University Women says, outraged that after 33 years of silence, Barbie's first words prove she's a bit of a bimbo. Some new Teen Talk Barbies say, "Math class is tough," and this, apparently, is bad for the confidence of preteen girls. What does Ken say? That's the good news: nothing.
  • Seeing Red Over Little Green Lies

    Sorry kids, you can't trust a superhero, at least when it comes to the environment. Comic books and cartoons are now trying to teach kids to save the planet. Too bad they get so much wrong. ...
  • 'Let's Get It On': Perils Super Special Sound B

    The presidential candidates are busy cramming for the three 90-minute debates coming up this month. Besides facts at their fingertips, they'll need snappy comebacks to tricky questions. To save them time to study the issues, PERI offers these one-liners: ...
  • Please, Mr. Postman

    Nick Bantock got the inspiration for the best-selling Griffin & Sabine (Chronicle. $16.95) four years ago, after a bout of postal envy. One day, after withdrawing his mail from his post-office box, the Vancouver artist was grumbling over the usual assortment of bills and circulars when a man nearby extracted from his box a "really nice looking letter from overseas." Walking home, Bantock found himself craving exotic mail. "Then it occurred to me, if you want a letter, write it yourself." ...
  • The Wounds Of Words

    Until eight weeks ago, Susan*, 37, lived in daily fear of David's return from work. "I would start shaking," she says. "I didn't know what kind of mood he'd be in. From noon on it would be sheer terror, because I'd be watching that clock. I couldn't eat; I couldn't sleep. I lost 25 pounds in two months." While Susan isn't a battered woman in the traditional sense, she took an emotional beating that left deep wounds of its own. David-with whom she has been involved on and off for five years-would fly into rages, complaining about dirt, slamming things around their house near San Francisco and lashing out about her use of money, says Susan, even though she was paying half the household bills. After the birth of their son, now a toddler, David's blasts of fury escalated into daily salvos. Not long ago, he also began to berate Susan's teenage daughter, who has threatened to run away. He even yelled at their son when the child didn't respond to his tickling. "The tiniest details would...
  • A Shockproof Electorate

    Voters Are More Adept Than The Politicans Think At Sorting Through The Rhetorical Muck Of The Campaign
  • Say Goodbye To The Pretender

    Who says chivalry is dead? Damsel in distress Daryl Hannah was allegedly injured in a fight in L.A. recently with singer Jackson Browne, her sometime boyfriend. But before she could say "Get me a lawyer," one showed up-looking like a lawyer in love. Who was that tanned man? None other than John F. Kennedy Jr., 31, who reportedly escorted the 31-year-old actress back to New York last week. They landed just days before "A Current Affair" aired a tape of them necking on a Gotham stoop. JFK and Daryl have been spotted together for years, but the tape was the best proof yet they are still hot and heavy. This shouldn't be a surprise to real Kennedy watchers. After all, John-John is hardly the first in his family to fly west for a pretty face.
  • A Deficit Plan That's No Joke

    Politicians have been losing elections by preaching fiscal sanity since the dawn of the republic-consider Walter Mondale and Michael Dukakis, to name just two. Now comes Ross Perot, who hopes to beat George Bush and Bill Clinton with a plan for balancing the federal budget as virtually his only weapon. The odds aren't good, to say the least. But even if Perot's reborn candidacy seems to border on the frivolous, his deficit plan is serious--and it just maybe the most detailed, balanced and thoughtful budget proposal ever presented in a U.S. presidential election. ...
  • Dining-Room Boutique

    Weary of fighting for a parking spot at the Parvenu Mall? Tired of waiting in line for a salesclerk too bored to take your credit card? Call Marilyn Parfet instead. She'll usher you into her well-appointed dining room, seat you in an upholstered chair and show off the latest women's ready-to-wear, tastefully draped across the window seat and the 18th-century mahogany table. Clothes hang on grids to make a discreet dressing room. In a standing mirror, you can see how your new wardrobe would wear in a real-life situation-if your real life takes place in a lovely Westchester, N.Y., suburb. ...