Newswire

Newswire

  • Buy Me Some Peanuts--And Sushi, Too

    Rockefeller Center, Columbia Pictures and now the Seattle Mariners. Despite an earlier ban on foreign ownership, the lords of baseball last week agreed to let investors led by Japan's Nintendo Co. buy the financially troubled team. Nintendo president Hiroshi Yamauchi said held leave baseball decisions in Seattle. But aren't those the Super Mario Brothers there in the outfield?
  • The Jesse Primary

    Now, here's a fun couple: Jesse Jackson and Ross Perot, arm in arm, smiling, thumbs up. An endorsement? Nope. Just good friends, Jackson says. Perot was simply posing for a ritual photograph after the Reverend's CNN chat show. ("You're not running," Jackson cooed on air. " You're flying.") Earlier, Perot had met privately for several hours with Jackson's National Rainbow Coalition brain trust. "He was very good on race," said a Jackson associate. "He talked values, not six-point programs. I'd been expecting a kook, but everyone seemed pretty impressed." ...
  • Quayle And 'Family Values'

    I keep wondering how the Queen of England is going to respond when Dan Quayle gets around to the subject of the royal family's "family values," as he surely will, what with Charles's reported mistress, Andrew's-or was it Anne's?-reported extramarital flirtations, and the rest. Are the Windsors guilty of "a poverty of values" too? I guess so. Quayle thinks those of us who treat his new campaign without the proper gravity are making fan of important moral values. But it is not the important moral values we are making fun of It is the highly selective, self-promoting and morally questionable nature of the Bush-Quayle moral-values campaign itself. ...
  • Sondheim's Still Here

    The ordinary songwriter, even the ordinary theater goer, might be relieved to know that Stephen Sondheim, the Tony-winning composer of "Follies..... Company" and "Into the Woods," uses a rhyming dictionary. Maybe that's what helped him pair "trenchant" and "penchant," or ,'vamp" and "camp." But it can't explain how he came up with something like this diabolical double whammy, a lyric that combines apocopation and internal rhyme--in three-quarter time, no less. ...
  • Scorecard

    Maybe morning-TV personalities are contractually required to become shameless hucksters for products that have nothing to do with their areas of expertise. Or maybe it's just that they'll do anything for a few more dollars. Will Phil and Oprah be next? Say it ain't so. PERI takes a look at the current coffee-time competition: Mentions little Cody in a Charles of the Ritz ad, thereby shattering her own world record for insufferability.America's lovable oaf stands in his undies, gobbles Burger King Breakfast Buddies, and we still kinda like him.Not to be outdone by his partner, the Rege pitches Aspercream, of all things. You get the feeling he hates it.Fake news set blurs line between her real job and that of Vaseline-lotion pitchwoman. Does she need the bucks for alimony?
  • Earth Ii: Tune In, Turn On And Tap Out

    What to do when the Earth Summit just gets too boring? When the byzantine politics and manic debates over convoluted treaties become too much to bear? For the multinational hordes who have descended on Rio, escape is just a cab ride away in Flamengo Park, site of the Global Forum-a harmonic convergence of nearly 1,000 nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) from 160 countries. Here the ecologically correct share space and vibes with Boy Scouts and Bhagwan wanna-bes, wing-nut scientists and holistic healers, the dance troupe Up With People and the PLO. "Who's not here?" asks Bill Bushbacher, director of the Tropical Forestry Program for the Worldwide Fund for Nature. ...
  • Stormy Weather: How The Major Airlines Stack Up

    Analyst Helane Becker predicts a break-even year at best and estimates total debt of $14 billion. But it's "the best-positioned airline," and major route acquisitions are behind it. ...
  • Battle Of The Bantamweights

    Washington's narcissism and provincialism-its tall inability to be interested in or understand anything but itself-was apparent last week as the city's political and journalistic cohorts purred contentedly about Ross Perot hiring two "seasoned professionals." That phrase was the cliche-of-the-day in the river of blather that eddied around the little pebble of a fact that the Perot campaign will be run by Hamilton Jordan and Ed Rollins, two faces familiar, as little about today's America is, to Washington. ...
  • Buzzwords

    Nobody ever interviews them after the game, but umpires have plenty to say on the field. Here are some colorful terms you might hear between calls: The players.A manager prone to arguing.Home-plate duty, closest to the bat-wielding rats.Third-base duty, which is usually pretty dull.A chest protector.Cleaning off home plate.A minor leaguer called up to the big league.Ejecting a Z-baller.
  • Taking Aim At The Bush Rumors

    One of the most gossiped-about political stories of the year will surface later this month in Spy magazine, a satirical monthly with a reputation for outrageousness. In a lengthy but not especially convincing cover story, Spy says George Bush has had at least three extramarital affairs. Two of the women Bush is alleged to have been involved with (before he became president) have held high-level jobs in his administration. None of the women (Spy names only one) admits to having had an affair with the president. ...
  • The Emancipator As Enchanter

    From "Lincoln at Gettysburg"No, he didn't write it on the back of an envelope, and he read it not in a Raymond Massey baritone but in a Kentucky-accented tenor. The crowd at the still-unfinished cemetery in Gettysburg, Pa., was neither bored by featured speaker Edward Everett's two-hour oration nor startled that President Lincoln got on and off in three minutes. That hapless photographer who was still setting up when the president sat down is a myth, too. But the most preposterous misconception is Abraham Lincoln's own guess that the world would "little note nor long remember" what got said that November day in 1863. The Gettysburg Address, writes Garry Wills in Lincoln at Gettysburg: The Words that Remade America (315 pages. Simon & Schuster. $23), amounted to nothing less than "a new founding of the nation." But Wills adds that it was also "one of the most daring acts of open-air sleight-of-hand ever witnessed by the unsuspecting. Everyone in that vast throng of thousands was...
  • 'The Long Island Lolita'

    So who says life's simpler in the suburbs? Mary Jo Buttafuoco thought she and her husband, Joey, had it all: the Biltmore Shores house on Long Island, the membership in the beach club, the speedboat down at the marina in Massapequa, N.Y. But the idyll had a flaw. Joey looked like a simple weight lifter, but, actually, he was a very complicated guy. He fell for Amy Fisher, a schoolgirl whose beeper meant a lot more to her than her binder, and suddenly their passion made "Fatal Attraction" look like horseplay. Last week Amy was in jail charged with attempted murder. From Manhattan to Montauk, the tabloids were running headlines like LONG ISLAND LOLITA and AMY'S HORNY HITMAN. And Joey, with a lot of explaining to do, was out on the stoop telling reporters that Mary Jo was "not OK." "She's got a bullet in her head," he said. "She feels lousy." ...
  • Mudslinger?

    Here's one reason why Ed Rollins should feel right at home now that he's been named Ross Perot's co-campaign chairman: they both fancy covert operations. NEWSWEEK has learned that in 1986, when Rollins handled Republican Linda Chavez's bid for Maryland senate seat, he suggested hiring an investigator to delve into opponent Barbara Mikulski's private life. Chavez said no. A proposal by Rollins's firm for a TV ad featuring an image of a closet-a veiled and unsubstantiated reference to Mikulski's sexuality-was also turned down by the Chavez campaign (Chavez did call Mikulski "anti-male"). Mikulski won overwhelmingly and is expected to be re-elected in November.
  • When Real Estate Is Really Like Sex

    Housesitter" is a romantic comedy about lying, and the refreshing twist is that it shows us the bright side of bearing false witness. Start with the title: there is nothing in this movie about housesitting; on the other hand, it's a better choice than "House Usurper," which is what the character played by Goldie Hawn really is. ...
  • Will Your Money Last?

    The reason you can't take it with you is that it goes before you do. Or so it may seem to the thousands of people now embarked on this nation's largest experiment ever in early retirement. They face the awesome task of making their money last for 30 or 40 years, and it's not clear they'll be able to make it. ...
  • Chicago's Career Queen

    First the good news: at least 100 types of jobs should be around and thriving in the year 2000. The bad news: mentioning some of them at a cocktail party would stop conversation faster than a fly in the foie gras. That's the lowdown from author and career-advice columnist Carol Kleiman, who predicts that jailers, truckdrivers, power-tool repairers and insurance-claims examiners will be among the most sought-after employees in the next decade. And as for glamour careers of the 1980s-well, as she bluntly advised a former Wall Street job seeker recently: "The party's over." ...
  • A Roman Catholic Museum

    Roman Catholics are prominent in American politics and business, but the nation's largest Christian church is nearly invisible in the one area where European Catholicism has long excelled: the fine arts. Now a $50 million fund-raising drive is on to create the first Catholic museum in the United States. The museum's likely home will be the ornate Duke-Semans residence, directly across Fifth Avenue from New York City's Metropolitan Museum of Art. Last month, Pope John Paul II gave his blessing to the project, and the Vatican Museum promised to lend art works for a special "pope's gallery." The museum is the dream of Christina Cox, founder of the little-known American Spirit Foundation. Five years ago, she rode up Fifth Avenue as "Miss Liberty" in the Saint Patrick's Day Parade. There she met Cardinal John J. O'Connor, who, because of Cox's vision, now stands to gain an unlikely new title: patron of the arts.
  • Never Too Old To Go On Line

    When JoAnn Oakes's husband died, six years ago, she found that evenings were the loneliest time. That was before she put an IBM-compatible next to her bed and joined SeniorNet, a national compter network for people 55 and over. Now when Oakes wakes up at 1:30 a.m., she can log on and engage in lively electronic discussions on everything from health problems to abortion, grandparenting to Ross Perot. She's made fast friends and rekindled her love life over the computer line. "Many of us feel left out of the world, " says the 63-year-old resident of Bainbridge Island, Wash. "The computer fills a social need-it's a major part of my life." ...
  • The Man And The Myth

    The great salesmen understand one thing above all: you sell yourself, not the product. Shoes, suits, data-management services: it doesn't matter. You make a sales call. You get in the door. You lend the customers your dreams, the myths of your own life, your belief in your wares. In the case of Ross Perot, candidate, the dictum is doubly apt. He's selling what he's always sold: a cocky faith in himself, in his ability to reach his goals. "This isn't about a guy with some 16-point plan on health insurance," says his top aide, Tom Luce. "This campaign is about Ross Perot's way of getting things done."Perot is making the sales pitch of a lifetime to a customer called America. We've had farmers, lawyers, soldiers and engineers as presidents. We've had an actor, and even a failed haberdasher named Harry Truman. But we've never had a salesman, let alone one like Perot. In the 1992 presidential campaign he's offering a series of images of himself--each, at first glance, with its own appeal...
  • War And Peace

    Recent leaders of the Soviet Union may have distrusted the United States. But that didn't stop them from appreciating Hollywood. A sampling of films most often borrowed from the state film agency, according to the Russian weekly Argumenty i Fakty: "Dirty Harry," "Rocky," "Jaws...... Taxi Driver," "Rosemary's Baby," "Emmanuelle," "Magnum Force," "The Godfather" and "The Deer Hunter.""The Godfather" and all James Bond movies (including "From Russia With Love")."Sun Valley Serenade," with John Payne, and "Waterloo Bridge," starring Vivien Leigh.