Newswire

Newswire

  • HELP FROM THE HOLY WARRIORS

    Until the mujahedin arrived last June, Alma Halep rarely stepped inside a mosque. Like most Bosnian Muslims, the 16-year-old girl had a lot more in common with her ethnic Serb and Croat neighbors than her Islamic "brethren" from the Middle East. War has changed her habits. Now she prays the traditional five times a day at a mosque in Travnik, the central Bosnian town where she, her mother and her younger brother fled after Serbs destroyed their home in nearby Turbe. Besides religious instruction, the visitors from the east are offering military assistance. "They are very good men," says Alma, tucking a few strands of blond hair under the blue scarf that covers her head. "In our country, some of the men don't want to be killed and are afraid to fight." As for the mujahedin, "They are the only ones who have come here to help us." ...
  • A CITY BEHIND WALLS

    In the whole, it's not too surprising that the Shatto Recreation Center near downtown Los Angeles survived last April's riots unscathed while buildings all around were looted and torched. There's not a lot to steal inside, except for some tennis racquets, and even an enraged mob would have to be exceptionally perverse to destroy its own basketball court. But it also is a building that defies you to burn it down, or even scratch your initials in it. Its roof rises from the ground in a graceful roll of galvanized steel, and the front and back facades are almost windowless expanses of textured brick--a surface designed to be as inhospitable to graffiti as a wall covered in English ivy. For many property owners, the lesson of the Shatto center in the wake of the riots is clear: if I had a steel roof on my house, it would take an atom bomb to burn it down. ...
  • Correction

    In our recent article on Ross Perot ("What Does He Want") NATIONAL AFFAIRS, Sept. 28), we incorrectly reported that Saatchi and Saatchi, the London-based advertising agency, had called television networks to ask about buying advertising time for Perot. Saatchi and Saatchi has denied its involvement, informing us that it has been working for the Bush/Quayle campaign under an agreement that prohibits it from working on any other campaign. Further investigation into the matter indicates that while an advertising agency did make such calls for Perot, our sources mistakenly identified that agency as Saatchi and Saatchi. NEWSWEEK regrets the error.
  • COUNTING THE GHOSTS

    Chilling, revealing and acrimonious by turns, last week's hearings before the Senate Select Committee on POW-MIA Affairs was another bitter chapter in the history of the Vietnam War-and an attempt, as it were, to prove the existence of ghosts. There were various estimates: 67 ghosts, 133 ghosts, possibly as many as 478 ghosts. The ghosts had names, ranks and serial numbers and relatives who, nearly 20 years after the U.S. withdrawal from Vietnam, followed the Senate hearings with anguished fascination. This was the moment when those who kept the secrets came forward to say in public what they had never said before. Yes, the U.S. government had reason to believe that at least some Americans were left behind when Richard Nixon announced in 1973 that all surviving U.S. POWs had returned from Vietnam. But no one could answer the all-important question: are any of the missing still alive? ...
  • THE HIV DATING GAME

    MEN AND WOMEN WHO CARRY THE AIDS VIRUS MUST MAKE TOUGH CHOICES WHEN THEY BECOME INTIMATE
  • the cultural elite

    Kenny Rogers is not in the "cultural elite." While he still knows when to hold 'em and when to fold 'em, none of his songs are currently shaping American culture. But Madonna certainly meets the entrance requirements. Ted Kennedy has been expelled. But Dan Quayle is a member. ...
  • Appearance Counts

    Never underestimate the importance of public relations. Along with aid for victims of Hurricane Andrew, the Federal Emergency Management Agency has set aside funds to spruce up its battered image. FEMA spent more than $50,000 on billboards and $73,000 on polo shirts for staffers. It has also solicited bids for buttons and Frisbees with FEMA's 800 number. "It comes out of the president's fund," a spokesman says.
  • How Did These Guys Get Here?

    Paul Tsongas, the brainy Massachusetts politician with the Elmer Fudd voice, becomes the first Democrat to enter the race.Five Democrats have entered the race: Virginia Gov. Douglas Wilder, Iowa Sen. Tom Harkin, Nebraska Sen. Bo Kerrey, Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton and former California governor Jerry Brown.Patrick Buchanan, a very conservative political commentator, enters the race for the Republican nomination. Buchanan will pull an impressive "protest vote" of more than 30 percent of Republicans in some states.On a trip to Tokyo, Bush throws up and collapses at a formal dinner. The episode worries voters, who think Vice President Dan Quayle isn't ready to take over the top job if Bush is incapacitated.One of the supermarket tabloids runs a cover story that says Bill Clinton had a girlfriend outside his marriage. Clinton goes on TV and says he and his wife have a strong marriage but he drops by 12 points in opinion polls.The first big primary: New Hampshire. Tsongas wins as Clinton...
  • Schlafly's Son: Out Of The Gop Closet

    Long before "family values" became an election year mantra for the Republican Party, Phyllis Schlafly was a frontline soldier for the conservative social agenda. The founder of the influential Eagle Forum has waged war against abortion, the equal rights amendment, sex education in the public schools and so-called alternative lifestyles. At the GOP convention in Houston last month she supported the party platform's condemnation of same sex marriages and gay civil rights. But last week her 41 year-old son confirmed that Schlafly's own family life has been something less than the Ozzie and Harriet ideal so righteously extolled by conservatives. In an interview with the San Francisco Examiner, Schlafly's son acknowledged that he was gay. ...
  • Mann In The Wilderness

    Not many filmmakers today are attempting grand passions, bold romantic gestures, love stories unfolding against breathtaking period landscapes. It's certainly not what you'd expect from macho stylist Michael Mann, the master of Armani-meets-Sartre urban fatalism, who brought us "Miami Vice" and the movies "Thief " and " Manhunter." Then again, if Susan Sontag can try her hand at a romance, why shouldn't the hard-boiled Mann translate James Fenimore Cooper for a late-20th-century audience? His gorgeous The Last of the Mohicans gets off to a bumpy start, gathers feeling and momentum and comes roaring into the homestretch at full gallop. When this historical adventure kicks in, it's thrilling in the way old-fashioned epics used to be, but its romanticism has a fierce, violent physicality that gives it a distinctively modern stamp. ...
  • Barbara Bush

    Barbara Pierce Bush grew up in Rye, N.Y., only a few miles down the Long Island Sound from George's childhood hometown of Greenwich, Conn. She was an outgoing, witty girl. At Christmas vacation, Barbara met George Bush; she was 16, he was 17. Later, she attended Smith College for one year, but dropped out to marry her high-school sweetheart. Since then, Mrs. Bush has followed her husband around the globe and has become one of the country's most popular First Ladies ever.
  • Schwarzkopf On Politics

    In a NEWSWEEK ON AiR radio interview Sunday, General Schwarzkopf addressed polities and the draft debate in the current presidential campaign. ...
  • New Lease On Life

    Until recently, it seemed that Lawrence Walsh would be the last special prosecutor. Republicans and Democrats were ready to pull the plug on the independent-counsel law, which expires in December. But last week, the post gained a new lease on life when a Senate committee backed a bill to renew the law; a House committee is expected to follow suit this week. Why the about-face? Democrats say new questions about Bush administration aid to Iraq before the gulf war has renewed their interest in the independent-counsel office. Republicans, with an eye on the polls, say the option of calling for a special prosecutor might come in handy one day if Clinton wins in November.
  • An Insider's Glimpse

    Matisse was the mystery man of modern art-a private, stiff petit bourgeois who, as it happened, painted the most luscious masterpieces of the century. One person who got a rare look at the reserved painter was Rosamond Bernier, the journalist renowned for her graceful, anecdote-filled lectures about art, and the author of "Matisse, Picasso and Miro: As I Knew Them." As an editor for Vogue in Europe, she first met Matisse in 1947 when he was close to 80. He was unfailingly formal with her, addressing her as Madame. He studied her closely, once even suggesting she get a yellow scarf to wear with her big orange Balenciaga coat. (She did.) Bernier was also a close friend of his son, the art dealer Pierre Matisse. In an interview with NEWSWEEK'S Maggie Malone, she talked about her impressions of the artist. ...
  • History Of Campaigns

    American politics has changed so much that a person who lived 200 years ago would barely understand what we do now. But one tradition has endured: from the beginning, our politicians have made fun of each other instead of shooting each other. The language-"campaign," "tactics," "battleground states"-comes from war. But American political fighting, unlike that in many other nations, has been mostly nonviolent. All with the first president, George Washington, who left office voluntarily. That set an example so other presidents would not try to be kings or dictators. ...
  • Bill Clinton

    Young Billy Clinton had little reason to worry about his report card: he usually got A's. The one exception was "deportment," or behavior. The reason he didn't ace that subject was that he talked too much in class. When he was in the second grade at St. John's Elementary School in Hot Springs, Ark., Sister Mary gave him a C in deportment. " I know he'll not tolerate this C, but it will be good for him," Sister Mary told his mom. "And I promise you, if he wants to be, he will be president someday." Obviously, he does want to be president-even though there are some people who still think he talks too much. ...
  • Goof Du Jour

    At a benefit in Baltimore last week, Paul Prudhomme made crawfish pancakes with Basmati rice, butter-veal glaze syrup and a dash of gun oil. Just kidding, folks. Which is what he might have said the next day, when airport guards spied a loaded pistol in his bag. The hefty chef forgot he had packed his target shooter-and he wasn't hiding it: "If I sat on it, no one would find it." At a cooking demo later he said, "I'd have brought my Uzi, but I couldn't find the shoulder strap."
  • 'It's Scary When You're Not Superman'

    If I really told you everything about me, you wouldn't like me." Dexter Manley is speaking from Ottawa, where he plays for the Rough Riders of the Canadian Football League. In fact he sounds likable, with a touch of the young Muhammad Ali. He enjoys the CFL, but he's not the top wild dog anymore. And "I don't like the pay--$75,000," a big falloff from his NFL high of $700,000. ...