Newswire

Newswire

  • Morgenthau's Mission

    Robert Morgenthau puffs on a long Dunhill Montecruz, one of the two cigars he will allow himself today "to quiet my nerves." The Manhattan district attorney, who just turned 73, has issued a bundle of indictments in the case of now defunct Bank of Credit and Commerce International. In fact, his sweeping charges of international corruption are certain to spark government scandals in a dozen countries. Not a bad birthday present. ...
  • Dog Days And Red-Hot Stuff

    What's got scruffy black fur, four legs and a tail, and likes to play dead? If you live in south Florida, it could well be Resusci-Rover, the newest member of the family of electronically correct mannequins that help humane humans learn to perform CPR (cardiopulmonary resuscitation). Last week the Palm Beach County chapter of the American Red Cross announced it will begin offering courses in mouth-to-snout rescue techniques this fall--and dog lovers from as far away as Ohio have phoned to find out about learning some new tricks.Breathing life into a canine companion isn't quite as close an encounter as you may think; you won't have to worry about any exchange of bodily fluids. Because a dog's mouth is so large, the rescuer clamps the animal's jaws shut, cups her other hand around its nose and puffs air in from a hygienic distance. (True dog devotees, of course, consider their pooches' smooches sublime and insist dog saliva is sterile.)As with people, dog resuscitation alternates...
  • The Limits Of Schmooze

    George Bush now lives in fear of the dreaded "L word"--not "liberal" but "landslide." So he's fighting back by flashing his national-security credentials. Surrogates are fanning out to claim that "children sleep easier" because of Bush's efforts to lift the threat of nuclear war. The explaining how the president "changed the world." ...
  • Deepening Shame

    On Sept. 7, 1991, life stopped imitating art for Marie Weston and Lisa Reagan. Until then, the two Californians bought the "Top Gun" image of naval aviators: hard-drinking, maybe, but dashing and decent all the same. At the Las Vegas Hilton for a getaway weekend last fall, Weston and Reagan kept running into officers attending the annual convention of the Tailhook Association, an independent group of retired and active naval aviators. When a Marine captain offered to accompany them to a Tailhook party, the women accepted. " These people protect our country," says Reagan. " I assumed I was OK." She was wrong. According to Reagan and Weston, the captain delivered them straight into the now notorious gantlet of drunken officers lining a third-floor corridor. Several dozen men hurled the women down the hallway, all the while pawing their breasts, grabbing their crotches, drenching them with alcohol. Ten minutes later, they say, the captain deposited them at the elevator with a jaunty, ...
  • Haiti Hiatus?

    Washington officials are bluntly telling exiled Haitian President Jean-Bertrand Aristide not to count on a continued U.S.-backed embargo. "The message is that, one way or another, the embargo is going," says a Washington source involved in efforts to end the Haitian crisis. U.S. officials are pressing Aristide to open talks with the interim government of Marc Bazin. Haiti's foreign minister was in Washington last week for hearings on the crisis. And an Organization of American States group recently returned from meetings with Bazin. Whether the boycott forces talks or not, "adding to Haiti's suffering can't be justified any longer," says the source.
  • The Paragon Of Reporters

    One recent balmy summer afternoon, Joseph Mitchell stood in the middle of New York's Fulton Fish Market and grinned like a schoolboy playing hooky. "As soon as I came down here in the '30s as a reporter, I felt at home," he said. Over a half century later, he is still prowling the market's cobbled streets. "It's so exciting, with the colors, the smells, the noise as the background to all that trading," he said. "Most markets now are abstract. It's stocks and bonds. But this is the real thing that those old Dutch painters painted. I think of it as the Dutchness of New York. I like that aspect of it, even the old Dutch names of the streets. If you come down here at 5 a.m. and walk around, you can't help leaving exhilarated." ...
  • Don't Wait For The Welcome Wagon

    When his old comrades In Moscow snubbed him, Erich Honecker holed up in the Chilean Embassy there last December. When the Chileans prepared to expel him, he considered North Korea. But Honecker, who turns 80 this month, decided to return to Berlin last week to face a series of charges, including manslaughter, stemming from his 18-year tenure as leader of East Germany.
  • Living With Training

    Shannon Miller won a silver and a bronze in the individual events while Kim Zmeskal was shut out.They wake up in the dark, while most everyone else is still sleeping. When other people's alarm clocks start ringing, they are already working at the gym. Their concentration is total, even at this early hour. Over and over, they twist and turn their bodies, making sure that each muscle knows exactly what to do. After practicing hundreds of moves, they might head off for a few hours of school; then it's back to the gym for an afternoon-into-evening session.And that's in the off season.To prepare for an important competition, such world-class gymnasts as Kim Zmeskal and Shannon Miller spend even more hours each day perfecting every detail of their performance. For teenage girls, the sacrifices are obvious. Zmeskal had to leave her Houston school in 1989; now she keeps up with class work through the mail. She has a strict low-fat, no-sweet diet and can't even remember the last time she...
  • The World's Fastest Birdie

    A British variation of an old Indian game has become the modern, high-speed rage of AsiaThere's a new event this summer at Barcelona, and it could be called Watch the Birdie. The official name, however, is badminton. Yes, badminton. Having survived tryouts at the 1972 Games in Munich and the 1988 Games in Seoul, it has now achieved full medal status. Badminton as an Olympic sport? What next, roller hockey? (Actually, yes; roller hockey is a demonstration sport in Barcelona, and if it fares well, it, too, could be a gold-medal contender.)Competitive badminton is a far cry from the garden-variety game, where families set up the net in the backyard and lazily ping the plastic shuttlecock back and forth while burgers sizzle on the barbie. And none of this plastic stuff for the pros-they use a shuttlecock made of 16 goose feathers taken from the identical wings of four different geese. Played indoors (less wind to blow the bird around), badminton demands speed, quick reflexes and stamina...
  • Bull Update

    When we last checked in with Shearson Lehman's Elaine Carzareill, in November, she was shrugging off a 120-point drop in the Dow Jones industrial average. In fact, she boldly predicted a 3800 Dow by the end of l992 and a President Bush victory this November. Despite the recent slide in the Dow, now at 3285, Garzarelli is still a Bush and market bull. Her advice: "Any correction is a gift. People should be buying [stocks] madly." By mid-1993, reckons the woman who called the crash of 187, the Dow could flirt with 4000.
  • Shark Repellent

    For now, there's a pretty good way to avoid getting hustled in pool halls: rack 'em up on L-shaped pool tables. The new tables-roughly the size of a regular table and a half-have become increasingly popular in the Midwest since they were invented two years ago by a Conover, Wis., cabinetmaker. Balls are racked at the "elbow," or the main corner, and you can break from either end. This clever configuration opens the way to countless new trick shots. Better yet, few people are expert enough to be sharks at it. The tables cost $4,000, and possible buyers should figure out ahead of time how to get them through the door.
  • The Corpses Of Summer

    Even Evelyn Wood might have trouble getting through this season's stack of thrillers and mysteries by Labor Day. If you're not a demon speed reader, you might take the sure route-Sue Grafton, whose new Kinsey Millhone case, "'I'is for Innocent," is her best yet, or Elmore Leonard, whose "Rum Punch" is irresistible from the start. ("Sunday morning, Ordell took Louis to watch the white-power demonstration in downtown Palm Beach.") But if you have the time and inclination to venture off the high road, you'll find plenty worth exploring, from dark alleys to deceptively serene country lanes. Here's a travel guide, including a red flag on a real tourist trap. You have been warned. ...
  • An Ultimatum For Saddam

    It was a long time to have to stand on tiptoe. For more than two weeks, the U.N. inspection team camped outside Baghdad's Agriculture Ministry. They were trying to seize documents believed to contain clues to Saddam Hussein's weapons plants-60 percent of which were left untouched during Operation Desert Storm-to force compliance with the Persian Gulf War cease-fire accord. The team expected the same kind of bullying defiance it had already met at least three times, before the Iraq's finally backed off. But this time Saddam didn't blink-perhaps calculating that George Bush's political weakness gave Baghdad a chance to get rid of the U.N. inspectors. Angry demonstrators threw stones and slashed tires. After a protester tried to stab an inspector with a skewer, as Iraqi police blithely looked on, the team withdrew. Exasperated, the United States, Britain and France dispensed with the usual vague talk of reprisal and threatened an ultimatum, warning that if Iraq failed to meet U.N....
  • Heptathlon Joyner-Kersee

    At the Olympic track-and-field trials In New Orleans last month, the other "world's greatest athlete," Jackie Joyner-Kersee, seemed to run into the ghost of championships past. Rounding the turn In the 200-meter, the world-record holder in 1988 Olympic heptathlon champ put her arms out as though she were protecting herself from a fall. She kept her footing-but it was at the same spot in the race where she strained her right hamstring at last year's World Championships in Tokyo, forcing her to leave the competition on a stretcher and in tears. Her husband and coach, Bob Kersee, said, "The ghost of Tokyo tapped her on the shoulder." ...
  • Bonanza?

    Will a good law go bad? The job portion of the Americans With Disabilities Act went into effect Sunday, and businesses worry it will whip plaintiffs' attorneys into a frenzy. Government officials, in fact, predict as many as 15,000 more complaints a year, some relating to employment practices like asking about an applicant's disabilities.
  • Ancient Splendors

    Reconstructing, in your mind's eye, the splendor of an ancient civilization from the artifacts in a museum is a little like building a life-size model of a brontosaurus based on some fossilized teeth. You peruse dozens of isolated objects, salvaged or stolen from dusty ruins-yet your imagination swims in images of golden thrones, spooky tombs and the prayer halls of faraway caliphates. If the show works, that is. Here are two that do: "Egypt's Dazzling Sun: Amenhotep Ill and His World" at The Cleveland Museum of Art (it will travel to Ft. Worth, Texas, and Paris) and "Al-Andalus: The Art of Islamic Spain" at the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. Both modestly scaled exhibitions run through Sept. 27. ...
  • Keeping The Big Mo Rolling

    Here's a problem Bill Clinton didn't dream of having a few weeks ago: how does he keep Big Mo on his side? Though he's still well ahead, the NEWSWEEK Poll shows that he has lost nearly a third of his 27-point post-convention lead over George Bush. One response in Little Rock, Ark., is to lower expectations. "We knew the boost was artificial," said Clinton communications director George Stephanopoulos. Other Clinton insiders are nervous. "The kind of crowds we're getting, the response-it's what you want to see in the final weeks," said one. "You don't expect it in the first few days." Here's how the Clintonites hope to stay ahead-and some of the pitfalls they face: ...
  • The Definition Of A Bad Trip

    Fidel Castro was looking to gain friends last week. Instead, he lost a couple. At a Latin American summit in Madrid, Castro hoped to strengthen Cuba's ties to Spain and other Latin countries. But the security chief at Madrid's Cuban Embassy and the chief videotape editor covering Castro's visit both took the opportunity to defect.
  • Barcelona: The Perfect Evening

    Why plow through tattered old travelogues when PERI can give you the ultimate insider's guide to Barcelona during the Olympics? After the day's events, stop in for a drink at Torres de Avila, a multilevel bar with a spectacular view of the city, thanks to trendy designer Javier Mariscal. Order a mojito, style concoction that sometimes has a luminescent green color. But be careful: prices are as spectacular as the drinks. Getting hungry? Models and assorted other Beautiful People head to Servicio Wilson, in the nearby foothills of Tibidabo, where great Catalan food is served along with Mexican, Japanese and Cajun. Back in town, taste the esqueixada cold, salted-cod salad (this is not paella country). When you're ready to walk off the dinner, wander over to Las Ramblas, a bustling promenade filled with chirping birds, fire-eaters and trendy cafes open until the wee hours. Finally, track down a coveted EC. Barcelona lapel pin (for the Football Club Barcelona). The sell it to pay for...
  • Bush's Problem

    Last week people said the Republicans were looking for a plan. The ones I talked with sounded more as if they were looking for Dr. Kevorkian's phone number. Everyone says that the huge imbalance in the Democrats' favor will not last forever and that the contest will get much closer as time goes by. But no one thinks a Bush victory can be achieved by doing nothing. All think it will require something. But the somethings differ, many of them sounding perfectly nuts. ...