Newswire

Newswire

  • Hypocrisy On Haiti

    Washington's welcome mat for Haitian refugees apparently depends on their VIP status. As the Bush administration announced it would close the U.S. naval base in Guantanamo, Cuba, to asylum seekers, The San Diego Union-Tribune reported that the navy's elite counterterrorist unit, SEAL Team-6, helped a few top officials in the Aristide government escape shortly after the coup. During the secret operation, confirmed for NEWSWEEK by Pentagon sources, SEALs slipped into Haiti and helped spirit out the political leaders by boat. "It was a textbook operation that had more than an average amount of suspense," said one Pentagon source.
  • 'You In Congress, Listen Up'

    Sounding the alarm against those who think the country is only the sum of its special interests
  • Not What The Doctor Ordered

    American drug companies are justly famous for their largesse. They entertain lavishly, they sponsor conferences and symposia, and they spend $350 million a year advertising in medical journals. Unfortunately, according to a study appearing in this week's Annals of Internal Medicine, the messages those ads convey are often dangerously unreliable. Researchers at UCLA examined a collection of prescription-drug ads from 10 leading medical journals and discovered that 92 percent violated federal rules designed to combat misleading claims. "Until existing regulations are applied rigorously," the study concludes, "the public is at risk." ...
  • Values In The Classroom

    The spring and summer of '89 were a notably sad time for young people, race relations and civic values. A band of wilding black and Hispanic youths attacked the white Central Park jogger that year, and a group of whites set upon the black 16-year-old, Yusuf Hawkins, in Bensonhurst. Norman Siegel, the executive director of the New York ACLU, was on a protest march in Brooklyn when he got the idea for an ethics program for teenagers. Several of the young men convicted in connection with the Hawkins killing had attended New Utrecht High, Siegel's alma mater, so he went there to teach his first class in racial tolerance. Siegel says the values course, which has spread to 15 other New York schools in the last three years, is "a cross between law school and 'Donahue,' with people clamoring to put [across] their point of view." ...
  • First Lady Culture Clash

    When Dan Quayle attacked Murphy Brown, some Democrats thought his real target was Hillary Clinton. Like the fictional newswoman, Hillary is a hard-charging professional who doesn't usually settle for a supporting role. Cultural pioneers get high ratings in Hollywood. But as Hillary has discovered, they make some people nervous on the campaign trail. And in a presidential race that could turn on the question of values, a candidate can ill afford to have a wife who somehow seems to symbolize the "wrong" ones. ...
  • Not Their Finest Hour

    War reporters approach books about their coverage with much the same mix of curiosity and fear they would a battlefield souvenir: wary of booby traps, but intrigued. Inevitably they are suspicious of analysts who, braving the thunder of video combat and visiting newspaper morgues, second-guess the judgment of those who actually reported the conflict. ...
  • The Books Of Summer

    It used to be easy to hype each summer's novels. A TAN-FASTIC FUN-IN-THE-SUN FICTION FIESTA. Or, HAVE A BALL WITH THIS BEACH-BAG BOOK BONANZA. This year, as the ozone layer melts away like a TV addict's attention span, all we can responsibly say is: here are some new books which you must under no circumstances take outdoors for more than five minutes without a hat and sunblock. ...
  • Nixon's Brief

    First he criticized George Bush for his "pathetically inadequate" efforts to help the former Soviet republics. Now Richard Nixon is off to Moscow to brief Russian President Boris Yeltsin on how best to obtain U.S. aid. Before leaving for Moscow, Nixon went to Washington last week for talks with senior administration officials. "He wants to make sure (the aid] doesn't get screwed up on either side," says a Nixon associate. "He thinks it's a historical necessity." Nixon is leading an American delegation to Russia and Ukraine to discuss private aid programs. The group is sponsored by the nonprofit Fund for Democracy and Development.
  • Let The Walls Tumble Down

    On the day the Berlin wall fell, late in 1989, I was in Jericho, whose walls had famously fallen some time before. New walls had since been erected, however, and I was imprisoned behind them. I had refused to do reserve service in the West Bank. I belong to a small group of soldiers who would rather go to jail than support the occupation. ...
  • Getting Tough On Serbia

    Hungry and shaken by two months of bombardment, Sarajevo residents came out of hiding last week during a rare moment of peace. As they lined up to buy bread, three mortar shells, fired by Serbian irregulars from a nearby hill, exploded in the crowded marketplace, killing at least 16 people and wounding more than 100. Moments later local TV cameramen captured the gore: survivors moaning and twitching in their own blood, severed limbs scattered among the dead and dying. Rescuers had to dodge sniper fire to reach the victims. One man, the lower part of his leg blown off, crawled toward the TV camera, begging for help. ...
  • A Mystery In Your Lunchbox

    Hungry? Sit right down, we're having catfish, corn on the cob, baked potatoes and fresh tomatoes. might turn out to be the most nutritious meal of your life. It might even be the best-tasting dinner you ever had. On the other hand, it might expose your body to a toxic combination no human has ever experienced before. Or it might induce an allergic reaction--even though you're not allergic to any of these foods. Still hungry? Bon appetit! ...
  • Out In The Cold

    Frustrated by his lack of sufficient access to Boris Yeltsin, Russia's chief spy is close to resigning, a longtime associate tells NEWSWEEK. The source says that Yevgeny Primakov, among the last of Mikhail Gorbachev's top aides now holding key posts in the Yeltsin administration, feels frozen out of the president's inner circle. Primakov worries that Yeltsin might fire him before meeting with George Bush later this month. To avoid embarrassment, the source says, Primakov may quit soon.
  • 'Iraq-Gate': Were We Soft On Saddam?

    The White House has long since abandoned any hope that George Bush can glide to re-election on the strength of his triumph in the Persian Gulf-and now, 15 months after Operation Desert Storm, it is uneasily facing up to the possibility that U.S. policy toward Iraq may be a political liability in 1992. The reason: bit by bit and month by month, congressional investigators have unearthed disturbing evidence that the Bush administration not only turned a blind eye toward Saddam Hussein's aggressive designs in the Middle East but may actually have helped the dictator rebuild his military machine for the invasion of Kuwait. To congressional Democrats, the gestating "Iraq-gate" scandal points up the president's underlying vulnerability on foreign-policy issues, while administration officials, indignant at what they consider to be cheap shots from Capitol Hill, are belatedly trying to defend a policy that unquestionably failed. ...
  • A Life And Death Puzzle

    There are many puzzling and disturbing things about the outbreak of birth defects in Brownsville, Texas, in recent years, not the least of which is the way it was discovered. Connie Riezenman, the infection-control nurse at Valley Regional Medical Center, recalls being mildly surprised when two mothers showed up within 24 hours in March 1991, carrying fetuses with anencephaly-an invariably fatal condition in which the brain fails to develop. A month later, in a span of 36 hours, three more mothers were admitted with the same diagnosis. "It was very scary," she recalls. "We thought, 'Oh my God, when is the next one going to happen?"' ...
  • Lost In Space

    Secretary of Housing and Urban Development Jack Kemp thought he had finally found grace in the White House. For three years, George Bush virtually ignored the "bleeding-heart conservative" and his "empowerment" proposals for solving urban poverty. Since the Los Angeles riots, Kemp has been a regular at White House meetings and on presidential trips to urban areas. But Kemp now says his presence on the stage with Bush is just window dressing. "Everything I say goes down a black hole," Kemp told NEWSWEEK. On a campaign swing last week, Kemp flew on the "overflow" plane with the press pool and some White House staffers, instead of Bush's small Gulfstream jet. And Kemp's suggestion that Bush mention Abraham Lincoln's Homestead Act-which Kemp sees as a historical precursor to his HOPE program for helping public-housing tenants buy their own homes-- was ignored.
  • No Day At The Beach

    The pioneers of "sunless" tanning were easy to spot. Like players in a low-budget sci-fi movie, they were the ones with distinctive orange hands yellow feet. But today, thanks to much improved technology, the indoor do-it-yourselfers blend in with the other glowing sybarites around the pool-the only difference is that their transformation from ghostly to golden took only a couple of hours. ...
  • Honey, I Shrunk The Disc

    Each summer in Chicago, dedicated techno-freaks hover in the shadows around the massive McCormick Place convention center. Their goal: cadging a precious plastic name tag from a departing conventioneer at the trade-only Summer Consumer Electronics Show, thus gaining entrance to a noisy, garish Valhalla of gadgetry. But this weekend there'll be no need for subterfuge: $10 will buy a tick-' et to a banquet of new electronic confections designed to entice reluctant consumers back into their local audio-video emporiums. ...
  • Is It Apocalypse Now?

    Slip the floppy disk into your Macintosh. Your mission: explore how the future of the world can unfold, without bringing the planet to the brink of apocalypse. The screen shows a rat's nest of loops describing 225 measures, from fertility to soil loss to industrial capacity. Hidden deep in the software are the equations relating them. Now choose your poison. Cut the same 42 million acres of forests that are being taken today; your world has no forests in 47 years. Click. Make your hungry people work the soil more intensely; land fertility, which fell only 5 percent from 19 70 to 2000, plunges 12 percent per year in 2040. Click. By the year 2020 reserves of minerals and other resources have shrunk to just 30 years' worth. Crop yields plummet billions starve. Industrial output per capita crashes; the "rich" live at the level of 1900. By 2100 your world has collapsed.It's not a very jolly video game. More like Malthusian Nintendo, it is a sophisticated simulation called World3 whose...