Newswire

Newswire

  • The Invisible Man

    Dan Quayle's place on the Republican ticket is secure, but don't expect to see a lot of the vice president this week in Houston. With Quayle's approval ratings in some polls at a record low, George Bush's advisers plan to keep the gaffe-prone veep out of the limelight. Quayle and his staff are staying at a separate hotel from the presidential party. Bush's men didn't permit Quayle to pose with the president for newsmagazine cover photos or other preconvention photos. Asked if the Bush camp was keeping Quayle under wraps, one top aide said, "Wouldn't you?" Quayle supporters offer a different explanation for the strategy. In the weeks ahead, they say, the Bush camp will try to make an issue of the fact that Bill Clinton is more popular with Al Gore beside him than he is alone. "We want to compare the two candidates," says a Quayle loyalist. "It's George Bush vs. Bill Clinton. Why does Clinton need Gore his side every two seconds? Can't he handle it alone?"
  • How To Look Like Your Jewelry

    For truly conspicuous consumers: why stop at coordinating your outfits? Cosmetics giant Estee Lauder and fashion-jewelry queen Carolee Friedlander now want you to make sure your earrings and necklaces are the same shade as your eye shadow--and, of course, they hope to sell you both. "You can't just put merchandise on a counter anymore," says Friedlander. "It has to be theater." Let's hope the stuff doesn't cost as much as theater tickets, though . . .
  • Better Than A Gold Watch

    In his new novel, "Wages of Sin," priest-author Andrew Greeley suggests a new interpretation for the old Roman Catholic idea of baptism of desire. At one point in the plot, his heroine slips off her robe, dives naked into a pool and pulls off her startled lover's swimming trunks. "You set me on fire," she breathes between passionate kisses, and sure enough, they make love right there in the water. ...
  • The Writing On The Wall

    As I came in one evening out of a driving rain, even the dull gray of my apartment building's lifeless lobby held a certain warmth. A grocery-store delivery boy headed out the door as I headed in. I did not envy him his job this night. In the elevator, my mood jumped a notch as I was hit with a distinct smell: in the short time I was gone, our superintendent buried years of grit under a new coat of paint. It was a nice touch, like taking a tired old dog to the groomer. ...
  • Sex, Abortion And Hypocrisy ..Se.-Campaign '92

    It's as if a country long obsessed with sex suddenly has a headache. A reporter asks the president in the Oval Office if he'd ever had an affair; the First Lady refers to a "fling" on the part of the Democratic nominee. Zzzzzzz ... Not tonight, honey. Stories that once sent a frisson of excitement through the body politic have become missionary-style dull. Even disgust with the prying press hasn't really caught fire this time, though it's not for lack of trying by the Republicans. Voters care about private affairs, all right, their own private affairs, like whether they have a job or can get an abortion.This year's unmistakable consensus is for privacy-to let both candidates and women do largely what they want with their bodies. A NEWSWEEK Poll shows 85 percent think the press should drop the entire infidelity question and that it's "not a serious issue"-for either candidate. The pro-choice position is now overwhelmingly supported even by delegates to the GOP convention. And so it...
  • Hats Off To Nashville

    The snowflakes dusting Garth Brooks's Stetson on the cover of "Beyond the Season" could mean only one thing: while the rest of us sweat through August, it's Christmas in the fiscal year of the hat. With a mere 119 shopping days left, Brooks releases his holiday set next week. But while Brooks's tasteful readings of chestnuts like "White Christmas" and "What Child Is This" have the yuletide niche to themselves for now, half of Nashville is chasing his success. Here are some of the contenders. ...
  • From Sea To Shining Sea

    In midsummer, the waters off Maine are at the serving temperature of white Burgundy, but they hold no terror for me. Tom Bergh, the owner of the Maine Island Kayak Co., has equipped my body for immersion with the same care nature lavishes on the coconut. And although over the next two days we will never leave the sheltering arms of Penobscot Bay, skirting islands at about the average distance a Madison Avenue bus keeps from the curb, our kayaks are packed with enough survival gear to paddle to Iceland. I have on full-length polypropylene underwear, waterproof rubber pants, a wet suit and a Gore-Tex sea-kayaking jacket that all by itself cost as much as the suit I was married in. I have a sea-kayaking hat festooned with more zippers, grommets, snaps and pouches than a carry-on suitcase. The first rule of sea kayaking is to know your equipment, but the person who said that clearly never encountered a six-page instruction booklet for a hat. I have a life vest that could support a...
  • The Golden Goose Bites Back

    Relief at last! That 10 percent mortgage is history; refinancing at 7% cut your payment by $300 a month. Enjoy the savings. But please, temper your exultation. Somebody on Wall Street may be crying.For most of the past decade, mortgages have been the Street's golden goose. More than $1.5 trillion of mortgages just like yours have been packaged into bondlike securities by investment banks and government-sponsored companies with nicknames like Fannie Mae, Ginnie Mae and Freddie Mac. Strong demand from banks, life insurers and individual buyers has turned traders of mortgage-backed securities into multimillionaires. But as interest rates tumble and refinancing soars, Wall Street is learning that the golden goose can bite. Says David Bullett of Teachers Insurance and Annuity Association, "It's caused quite a ripple in the market."In the bond market, lower interest rates are good news. But mortgages are a different animal: as rates fall, homeowners can easily refinance and pay off their...
  • Attack Of The Killer Seaweed

    Officials in France, Spain and Italy are scrambling to turn back the green tide: a highly toxic seaweed is invading the Mediterranean. Ingesting a single gram can kill a rat. Though Caulerpa taxifolia hasn't yet hurt any people, scientists fear it's disrupting the ecosystem by smothering other plant life. Some blame Jacques Cousteau's Oceanographic Museum for unleashing a sample of the stuff. Whatever its source, this native of tropical seas has no predators on the Riviera, has clogged the seascape from Nice to Menton and shows no sign of stopping.
  • 'A Conspiracy Of Silence'

    "All our American POWs are on the way home," President Richard Nixon told the nation on March 29,1973, after a peace agreement in Paris formally ended U.S. involvement in the Vietnam War. And for years afterward officials publicly scoffed at suggestions that U.S. servicemen might still be alive in Vietnam, Laos or Cambodia. It was "at least a conspiracy of silence," says Sen. John Kerry. His select committee has questioned dozens of witnesses and forced the White House and Pentagon to declassify more than a million documents in an effort to put the issue to rest. In the most dramatic hearings yet, three Reagan administration officials testified last week that the government feared from the start that some live prisoners were left behind, although they had no proof. Called to testify under oath, former assistant defense secretary Richard Armitage, former National Security Council staffer Richard Childress and former Defense Intelligence Agency head Lt. Gen. Leonard Perroots repeated...
  • The Face Of Defeat

    The Serbs have all but won their war in Bosnia. Their brutal policy of ethnic cleansing has demolished whole villages and made refugees of more than 1 million civilians mostly Muslims and Croats. A "cleansed" corridor now stretches 200 miles from Belgrade to Bihac, beginning to turn the twisted dream of a Greater Serbia into geopolitical fact. Last week the assembly of the self-declared "Serbian Republic" in Bosnia and Herzegovina passed an audacious resolution that institutionalized the spoils of war. Completely excluding the Muslims and Croats who remain in Bosnia, it declared an alliance with the "new" Yugoslavia(Serbia and Montenegro). "Once you get independence, it becomes too precious," Radovan Karadzic, president of the "republic," told NEWSWEEK. "It's like a jewel, and you can't give it up anymore." ...
  • Will Trade Free North America?

    The new North American Free Trade Agreement paves the way for a $6.5 trillion megamarket. An ecstatic Carlos Salinas de Gortari all but declared his nation liberated from the Third World. Yet north of the border the agreement was buried in the "family values" media mud storm. The pact still has to pass the U.S. Senate, with a potential fight brewing over environmental and labor concerns.
  • Gay Gop's The Enemy Within

    They're predominantly white, affluent and fiscally conservative. They believe in small government and the primacy of individual rights. They Bill Clinton and his campaign rhetoric with suspicion. It's a group of voters who ought to be residing comfortably in the mainstream of the Republican Party. But for gay and lesbian conservatives the Big Tent is off-limits. Closeted homosexuals serve at every level of the GOP (and the Democratic Party), from elective office to appointive government posts to jobs with Washington lobbying firms. Yet those who've come out will be among the enemy at the Astrodome this week, condemned in the party's right-leaning platform and targeted by a "family values" message that serves as shorthand scorn for their lifestyle. They'll get no solace from their Democratic brethren either: many regard gay GOPs as self-loathers and lavender Uncle Toms. "I have the unique pleasure of being on the opposite sides of both Barney Frank and Jesse Helms," says Richard...
  • A Lightweight Takes On The Big Boys

    Not all success stories are as painful as Sheri Poe's. Conceived in 1987 as an answer to Poe's backache, RYKA's athletic shoes have labored through a series of mishaps and bad timing that would have knocked out a weaker competitor. Money-lenders hooted at her business plan. Quality problems hobbled the first shoes. There were times when sheer survival seemed so dicey, Poe says, she began to pray that the periodic rumors of a takeover were true. Today RYKA, the only producer of women's athletic shoes actually run by women, is racing toward $12 million in annual sales-small by Nike's standards, but undoubtedly healthy. ...
  • Texas Two-Step

    In 1957, when Ike was president and sputnik had put the fear of God-or godless communism-into America, two lanky young men teamed up on a tennis court in Houston. They were ideal doubles partners: lefty and righty, excitable and cool. They were products of the same world: of boarding schools, the Ivy League, military credentialing. They shared a knack for business, a hunger to lead and a desire to build the Republican Party as their vehicle. ...
  • What Went Wrong-Campaign '92

    It was just another meeting, the same old meeting, with the same players ... and the same result. John Sununu had called the president's top domestic-policy advisers to his White House office and asked for guidance: was there anything George Bush should do differently now? Budget director Richard Darman said no, the sluggish economy was about to boom. Pollster Bob Teeter said no, the public wanted the president to pursue his foreign-policy initiatives and, anyway, people didn't trust government activism very much. Someone mentioned that Jack Kemp, Congressman Newt Gingrich and the usual wild-eyed activist suspects thought it was the perfect time to launch a domestic-policy blitz-push a growth package, push school choice, an urban agenda. But no one took that seriously. Kemp was a blabophiliac. And Gingrich had lost his place among George Bush's 3,000 closest friends by turning tail on the president's budget summit. ...
  • A Mixed Record

    Yes, substance counts-and in 1992, George Bush's hopes for victory probably depend on a large bloc of upscale "swing" voters who are plainly fed up with talking-point campaigners and sound-bite politics. A selective look at key areas of the Bush record: ...
  • 'The Media Isn't Doing Its Job'

    In an interview at the vice president's residence, Marilyn Quayle greeted NEWSWEEK'S Ann McDaniel and Clara Bingham with barely a smile and a limp handshake. She made no secret of her dislike for the press as she talked about a wide range of issues. Excerpts: ...
  • The Little Prince

    She was single when she became a mother-to-be, thanks to a certain lack of protection by the father-to-be, her former bodyguard. Princess Stephanie of Monaco, 27, still wasn't guarding her body too carefully when a photographer recently caught her airing the royal belly on the French Riviera. The baby, a boy, is due in November. Stephanie and sweetheart Daniel Ducruet have no immediate marriage plans-but say they eventually expect to move on from bedding to wedding.