Newswire

Newswire

  • Here We Go Again

    Call it deniability, campaign style. The White House is officially disclaiming any connection with Floyd Brown, the conservative political strategist behind the infamous 1988 ad featuring furloughed convict Willie Horton. But Bush campaign officials are said to be privately delighted that Brown is back in business. He set up a Presidential Victory Horton Committee in the basement of a town house near the Capitol earlier this month. He expects to raise at least $10 million for TV spots attacking the '92 Democratic nominee. Brown declined to discuss specific plans for the ads, but his team is combing Bill Clinton's record for a Horton-like issue.
  • Fergie Flops At The Palace

    He was the royal stud-the "Randy Andy" who made Koo Stark famous. She was an exuberant woman of the world, fresh from a three-year hitch with a live-in lover. The daughter of a polo-playing military family, Sarah Ferguson was the feisty commoner who would keep Britain's Prince Andrew happy. But Fergie was undone by the same breezy qualities that made her seem so refreshing in 1986. She drew criticism for her weight, her haircut and her clothes. Royal watchers frowned on her friends, her perceived inattentiveness to her two daughters and her penchant for cutting up in public. She never fit in with what Prince Philip calls "the family firm," and last week she was unceremoniously shown the palace door. ...
  • Please, Spare Us A Boom

    Although doubters remain, the overwhelming evidence is that the economy has begun a sustained recovery. Housing construction and retail sales have risen smartly. Consumers have cut debt loads, increasing their purchasing power. Banks are beginning to dig out from huge loan losses. Inflation is low. The recovery could, of course, get derailed by surprise developments. But for the time being, we ought to be asking what kind of recovery we'll need. ...
  • An Uplifting Experience

    It's not for everyone. But there's a unique "entertainment" phenomenon drifting around the Pacific Northwest these days: The Jim Rose Circus Sideshow Freaks. Throughout the region, thrill-seeking trendies pack in to see Mr. Lifto, who hoists blocks of cement from hooks and chains attached to his nipples. Then there's The Tube, who drinks and serves beer in, let's say, a uniquely personal way. How hot is the show? Even the "Northern Exposure" crew dropped in one night, though it's unclear how many were able to stomach the guy who eats live slugs. Meanwhile, freakmania is spreading unabated. New York's Coney Island will offer a show-replete with a man who hammers nails up his nose-all summer.
  • Across The Divide

    Apartheid did the job intended for it: it created a society in which human separation seemed almost an order of nature. Displaced black squatters lived by themselves in squalid camps outside the cities. Black farmers worked alone in a vast and sometimes harsh land. Black children came of age apart from whites--and divided, too, from Indian South Africans and even sometimes from blacks of different tribes. But as a formal policy, racial separation was doomed by its inefficiency, high cost and the opposition it aroused abroad-and most South Africans knew it. Last week's whites-only vote to begin the process of dismantling apartheid met with overwhelming approval inside South Africa and a near-universal welcome outside. Black and white students celebrated together in one sign of the social barriers that have already fallen. But when the first bursts of jubilation die down, South Africans will be left to finish the work of exorcising the deep suspicions and abiding grievances that have...
  • Married, With Children

    She's gone from baring her buttocks to baring her soul. Well, kind of. Former Miss America-she hates to be called that-Vanessa Williams lost her crown in 1984 after Penthouse exposed her. Now she's an aspiring singer; one song "Save the Best for Last" is tops on the singles charts. In the April McCall's, she tells Deborah Norville (herself a deposed star) about her comeback. They discuss Williams's husband, Ramon Hervey II, her two daughters and such pressing matters as facials, dinner menus and baby fat. Hey, it beats answering stupid questions from Bert Parks.
  • 'I Leaned Out And Saw The Abyss'

    Jorge Cohen, press attache for the Israeli Embassy in Buenos Aires, stepped outside his second-floor office to make some photocopies when the blast hit. It blew him back nearly 30 feet. Cut and dazed, he stumbled past two bleeding bodies to look for his secretary. "I leaned out and saw the abyss," he says. At least 28 people, including four Israelis, were killed when, the government believes, 130 pounds of explosives inside a Ford pickup parked at the embassy went off. It was the worst terrorist incident Argentina has ever suffered. ...
  • At Chrysler's Wheel: A 'Car Guy'

    Robert J. Eaton is what the auto industry calls a "car guy." As the former head of General Motors' European operations, he spearheaded the creation of snappy new Opel models and was the driving force behind the flamboyant Lotus Omega, an Opel derivative with a top speed of 176 miles per hour. GM insiders depict Eaton as an inveterate car enthusiast who was disappointed if he didn't have a different GM car to test-drive every day. "He had an instinctive feel for the market," says Garel Rhys, an economist at the Cardiff Business School. "He knew what Europeans wanted." ...
  • Can He Beat Bush?

    Bill and Hillary Clinton were taking a rare day off at home in the Arkansas governor's mansion last week when they got an unexpected phone call. It was former senator Paul Tsongas, saying he was leaving the race for the Democratic nomination. Clinton should have been jubilant: he had just moved a giant step closer to the presidency of the United States. Yet when he lumbered down the spiral staircase to head back onto the campaign trail, Clinton seemed oddly subdued. "This whole thing just started today," he said quietly. ...
  • Betting On A Guilt-Free Egg

    You've heard about rot-resistant tomatoes and hormone-enriched cattle. How about high-tech eggs? Scientists have scrambled for years to invent a healthier version of the much-maligned breakfast food-and now, the race is over. Well, maybe. Last month, Michael Foods Inc., a Minneapolis processed-foods maker, announced plans to market Simply Eggs, a liquid whole-eggs product treated with a compound that the company says extracts 80 percent of its cholesterol. The news whipped up immediate excitement on Wall Street, initially pushing Michael's stock up $5 to $20.50. (It has since dropped to $16.87.) But skeptics say the company may have overhyped the stuff's health benefits and ask: is it Michael Foods' investors who are in for a beating?. ...
  • The Real Character Issues

    For obvious reasons, Bill Clinton prefers not to talk about character. But one night in February at an Elks Lodge in Dover, N.H., he took a stab at it. For once, the smooth bark was stripped off, and the pure sap of ambition and idealistic defiance came pouring through. "I'll tell you what I think the character issue in this election is," he shouted into the smoky air. "How can you have the power of the presidency and never use it to help people improve their lives until your life needs saving in an election?" ...
  • When Kids Molest Kids

    This is not just kids saying, "Show me yours and I'll show you mine." We're talking about 5-year-olds that initiate oral copulation, 9-year-olds that sodomize ...SANDRA BALLESTER,For years it was thought that the deadly cycle of sex abuse began and ended with adult offenders who themselves had been molested as children. Now it looks as if only half the story has been told. The long unacknowledged truth is that there is a large population of molested children in this country who turn around, at startlingly tender ages, and become child molesters themselves. Almost before they can be gathered in for healing as victims, they inflict their terrible wound on others. No one knows for sure how many such young victim-victimizers there are. But as more and more cases come to light, experts speculate they number in the thousands-and even that estimate may be conservative.That the problem went unrecognized for so long is not surprising to psychologists. Parents of young molesters are...
  • A Little Clinic On The Side

    Rosana Trinidad feels betrayed. On the advice of her gynecologist last summer, the 38-year-old mother of two went to a clinic in Titusville, Fla., for a mammography exam. Two sets of X-rays revealed a mysterious formation in her right breast, so Trinidad was scheduled for a biopsy at the local hospital. Three agonizing weeks later, just minutes before the operation, the hospital's radiologists performed their own preliminary mammography-and found there was nothing wrong with her breast. ...
  • '92 Campaign Edition

    The CW is sorry the races seem to be wrapping up so early. But fun's ahead. Both Bush and Clinton will be buried and revived a dozen times between now and November. ...
  • Do Not Pass Go

    Your datebook notes April 15 with the entry, PAY TAXES. But the diary that Leona Helmsley's clutching likely has a more pressing command: GO To JAIL. Last week a federal judge in Manhattan ordered her to surrender that day to begin a four-year sentence for tax fraud. The 71-year-old hotel queen has been free on $25 million bail since 1989. She pleaded that jail time would kill her; as if to prove the point, she later collapsed outside the courthouse. Her first possible job in the pokey? Maid service.
  • The T Stands For Troubled

    In his white pants and dark blue blazer, religious broadcaster Paul Crouch always looks on camera as if he had just stepped off a yacht. He is, in fact, an expert navigator in the perilous seas of televangelism. While other TV evangelists like Jim Bakker and Jimmy Swaggart drown in disgrace, the low-key Crouch has cruised to the top of religious broadcasting. His Trinity Broadcasting Network, with more than 285 stations, is the largest purveyor of religious programming in the world. ...
  • Buzzwords

    At the Oscars, they even have nicknames for the nominees, among other things: Laura Dern and mother, Diane Ladd.Jodie Foster, who's everyone's favorite.Oliver Stone.Jack Palance. (That's what old-time Westerns used to be called.) What could hurt "The Silence of the Lambs."
  • A New Day Dawns

    South African President F. W. de Klerk couldn't have asked for a sweeter birthday gift. On the day he turned 56 last week, he learned that nearly 70 percent of his fellow white South Africans had voted to endorse his efforts to negotiate an end to apartheid. For the overwhelming majority of South Africans, white and black, the referendum was a moment to savor: as a result of the vote, stalled constitutional negotiations between the government and black leaders suddenly recovered their momentum, and white reactionaries were in retreat. Not since the February 1990 release of Nelson Mandela had the nation experienced such good feeling. "Let us look forward, let us take hands and use this magnificent result as a great impetus for what we have to do," de Klerk proclaimed. ...
  • Eddie Olmos's East L.A. Story

    "How many people feel like going out and gangbanging?" This is Edward James Olmos, talking to members of youth gangs invited to a screening of his movie, American Me, in San Antonio, Texas. At first hesitant, uneasy, the audience, largely Latino, begins to respond to Olmos, who draws them out as he preaches, struts, cajoles. Hands go up. Gang members, mothers of gang members, ex-offenders stand up to speak. Voices crack, tears flow. They thank Olmos for making the film. It is the truth, they say. ...
  • Testing Ground

    He was waiting, like a messenger from Media Hell, on the tarmac of a tiny airport south of Manchester, N.H. When the door of Bill Clinton's jet opened that dreary morning in mid-February, ABC News producer Mark Halperin handed Clinton campaign manager George Stephanopoulos a letter. Stephanopoulos read one sentence and felt for a moment as if he was going to collapse. ...