Newswire

Newswire

  • The Heart Of The Matter

    Anne Truitt is an artist of the old school. That she was born into genteel circumstance in Baltimore in 1921 and graduated from Bryn Mawr during World War II are only indirectly connected. Yes, Truitt is a grandmother who lives and works not in Soho but in Washington, D.C., reads the classics, and is given to saying things like "I have a friend in Horace." ("I like to smoke when I talk," is about as downtown as she gets.) Of course she writes well, having published two critically praised memoirs, "Daybook" (1982) and "Turn" (1986). But what really marks her as an orphan of the current cacophonous scene is her beautiful sculpture. Fifteen examples of it, dating from 1961 to 1988, are the subject of a jewel-like exhibition, "Anne Truitt: A Life in Art," at The Baltimore Museum of Art through April 19. ...
  • Will Hillary Hurt Or Help?

    It was the summer of 1974 and Bill Clinton, then a 28-year-old law professor at the University of Arkansas, was making his political debut as a candidate for Congress. His headquarters was an old bungalow on College Avenue in Fayetteville and his campaign limo was a green AMC Gremlin. Every day, Clinton stumped the district in his Gremlin, then drove back to Fayetteville with pockets full of business cards and scraps of paper from the folks he'd met. This jumble of names and notes--vital intelligence for his election effort-became an untidy pile on his desk, a symbol of the campaign's chronic disorganization. Then Hillary Rodham-a Yale Law graduate like Clinton, and soon to be his wife--arrived. Fresh-faced, smart as whip and a born organizer, Hillary "sat right down and went to work," an old friend, Ann Henderson, recalls. "We didn't really have a campaign manager until she came along. After that, we did." ...
  • The Calm After The Storm

    At the University of Chicago, Gerhard Casper earned a reputation as a legal scholar and a brilliant administrator. But the most important credential he brings to his new job as Stanford University president may be his status as an outsider-with no connection to charges that Stanford overbilled the federal government by up to $300 million in research grants. A sense of humor doesn't hurt, either. When he was named Stanford's ninth president last week, the 54-year-old Chicago provost had his own theory of why he was the search committee's unanimous choice. The German-born Casper joked that the trustees wanted someone who could correctly pronounce a Stanford motto: "Die Luft der Freiheit weht" (The wind of freedom blows). ...
  • Wreckage On The Hill: The Body Count Begins

    "Never apologize, never explain," the saying goes. Legislators were doing both last week, all the while wishing that It would just disappear. But Rubbergate proved to be a scandal with bounce. Down in the wards, the House bank affair claimed its first victims-a sign that anti-incumbent fever could prove deadly this season. On Tuesday, Chicago voters kicked out Democratic Rep. Charles Hayes after five terms. He had told critics his 716 overdrafts were a private matter, but Illinois voters obviously disagreed; for good measure, they even threw out Rep. Gus Savage and Sen. Alan Dixon-two incumbents untainted by the checking scandal (box). New York Rep. Robert Mrazek's long-shot bid for the Democratic Senate nomination began to look doomed after he was identified as worst abuser currently in the House, with 972 bum checks. Now, says Democratic Senatorial Campaign Committee political director Don Foley, "Everyone is asking, 'Does this mean I'm vulnerable, too?'" ...
  • Bombs Away

    Environmentalists are keeping a wary eye on plans to expand U.S. military exercises in or near national parks and wilderness areas. After finding flares and other debris, officials at Alaska's Yukon-Charley National Preserve suspect that a 35,000-acre fire there last summer was caused by a military exercise. Meanwhile, there is concern that several planned exercises will harm wildlife and ruin the solitude in Idaho and Colorado parks. The military has stood behind such exercises, calling sonic booms "the sounds of freedom."
  • A New Warning For Saddam

    It was time to put Saddam Hussein on notice-again. Fed up with the Iraqi leader's welshing on agreements that ended the Persian Gulf War, the United Nations last week demanded that Baghdad come up with a comprehensive plan for destroying its ballistic-missile capability. Or else. The "else," as always, was the prospect of renewed allied bombing. Using the press to get its message to Saddam, Pentagon sources offered details of combat readiness: about 50 nuclear, chemical or ballistic-missile facilities were targeted for air or missile strikes, they said. Just in case Saddam missed the point, the aircraft carrier America steamed into the gulf with 85 warplanes. "We will see whether he plans to comply, defy or try to be cute," said a senior U.S. official. Saddam put his military on full alert. ...
  • Kosher Cruises For Passover

    Passover has always been a time for remembrance and celebration. Today, however, more and more Jews happen to observe the holiday while, say shaking their booties on a Caribbean cruise. Kosher Passover tours-first started years ago-are suddenly a major industry for cruise lines and resorts across the country. On Singer Island, Fla., the Howard Johnson Oceanfront Plaza Resort is nearly sold out of a package that includes a "murder/mystery Passover Seder," in which a whodunit is acted out as people break matzo. Travel agents are offering Seder-and-gambling cruises to Nassau. And Ft. Lauderdale's Bonaventure Spa boasts kosher barbecues and a dance band called Schlock Rock. "They're great," says a travel agent. "They're from New York!"
  • Maverick's Playground

    Ross Perot rolled into Washing-ton last week as a marvel of politico-genetic engineering. Testing the reception for an independent presidential candidacy, the jug-eared Texas billionaire gave a speech embodying just about every protest theme of 1992. There was a nod to Paul Tsongas's piety through pain ("Let's start making some sacrifices to leave our children a better country"), a flick at Pat Buchanan's neoisolationism ("Pass a law making it a criminal offense for foreign companies or individuals to influence U.S. laws or policies with money") and a salute to Jerry Brown's war on Washington ("This city has become a town filled with sound bites, shell games, handlers, media stuntmen..."). In short, he said, "it's time to take out the trash and clean out the barn." ...
  • Pound Foolish?

    The United States has been widely criticized for not providing enough aid to the former Soviet Union. Here is a breakdown of contributions to the Commonwealth of Independent States from September 1990 to December 1991. Country Donation in billions Germany $34.88 Italy $ 5.85 United States $ 4.08 European Commission $ 3.88 Japan $ 2.72 Spain $ 1.36 France $ 1.22 United Kingdom $ 0.07 Others $14.01 SOURCE: NATIONAL PLANNING ASSOCIATION
  • A Spouse Was Easier To Find Than A Church

    Five months after pledging publicly to put his private life in order, Sen. Edward M. Kennedy announced last week that he would marry Victoria Reggie, the 38-year-old daughter of old family friends from Crowley, La. But it is unlikely that the wedding, planned for later this year, will be blessed by the Roman Catholic Church. Both Kennedy and his fiancee are divorced Catholics; under canon law neither is free to remarry without church annulments of their previous marriages. As Cardinal Bernard Law of Boston explained last week, "in the eyes of the church," Kennedy is still married to his former wife, Joan, who divorced him in 1983. Reggie, a Washington lawyer, divorced in 1990. ...
  • Freeze Out?

    Democracy is in a holding pattern in Kansas. The number of potential candidates filing for office is down 75 percent from 1988 because they don't know where to run. After months of debate, the legislature, which is required to approve a new political map by April 11, is hopelessly deadlocked. The Democrat-controlled House recently passed a redistricting plan, but the Republican-controlled Senate hasn't even considered it yet. Any map the legislators approve will have to be reviewed by the courts. "It's a travesty," says Iola insurance agent Gary McIntosh, an aspiring state Senate candidate. "They want to freeze out new faces." Kansas will lose one congressional seat this year.
  • No Instant Answers

    It has become as much a ritual of the National Football League as the opening coin toss. A big play occurs on the field. All eyes dart to the giant screen for the replay. Then, almost as one, the crowd looks upward toward some nameless officials hidden behind plexiglass and a multitude of TV screens. And then comes...The Wait. ...
  • Murder By Mistake?

    Was the killing of the Hizbullah leader Sheik Abbas Musawi, assassinated in Lebanon last month by the Israelis, an accident? After the attack by Israeli helicopter gunships on a convoy carrying the Shiite cleric and his family, Israeli Defense Minister Moshe Arens called the raid a planned assault aimed at sending a "message to all terrorist organizations." In fact, NEWSWEEK has learned, it was a botched operation. The real goal of the mission, Israeli sources say, was to kidnap Musawi and bring him to Israel for trial or exchange for an Israeli POW believed held by the Hizbullah. The operation went wrong, the sources say, when the U.S.made Apache helicopters tracking the convoy misfired. They were meant to take out the vehicle carrying Musawi's bodyguards, allowing commandos in a backup chopper to land and capture him alive. Instead, an Israeli missile hit Musawi's car, incinerating everyone in it. An Israeli armed forces spokesman denied there was any plan to "kidnap" Musawi.
  • The Daughter I Gave Away

    Every so often, the media bring us another reunion of adopted children and their natural parents. It typically ends this way: the parent (usually the mother) and child (now an adult) are happy to have found one another. But in time the relationship becomes "troubled." And even in the best of circumstances, the reporter usually adds, the two people can never be more than "friends." ...
  • 'You Didn't Reveal Your Pain'

    Bill Clinton's father, William Blythe III, after whom he was named, died in a car accident before he was born. He was raised by his grandparents from age 2 until 7 when his mother, with whom he is still close, married Roger Clinton Sr. Bill loved his stepfather and took his name, but Roger Clinton was an alcoholic prone to violence. After one ugly incident young Bill, still in his early teens, pointed to his mother and young half brother and warned his stepfather: "You will never hit either of them again. If you want them, you'll have to go through me." His stepfather backed down. In recent weeks Clinton has paused at various times along the campaign trail to talk with NEWSWEEK'S Eleanor Clift and Jonathan Alter about the influence of those early years on him. Excerpts: ...
  • Searching For Nirvana Ii

    In his home in Lawrence, Kans., Peter Fitch picks up the phone on the third ring. "Pizza Hut." ...
  • Broadway Mind-Stretchers

    In a rare week, the two most eagerly awaited serious plays of the season arrived on Broadway. John Guare's Four Baboons Adoring the Sun boasts England's superstar director Peter Hall and Tony-winning players Stockard Channing and James Naughton. Ariel Dorfman's Death and the Maiden has America's superstar director Mike Nichols and movie luminaries Glenn Close, Richard Dreyfuss and Gene Hackman. In such a week playgoers could hardly want more. Or could they.? ...
  • Hold My Calls

    Homeless people looking for work have one big problem: prospective employers can't reach them, except perhaps at chaotic shelters. Now a nonprofit Seattle group called The Worker Center has a solution: free voice-mail boxes for people without homes and offices. A person living on the street can now get a private number and leave a personal greeting so employers responding to his calls can leave messages. "People who usually take six to nine months to find work," says Worker Center spokeswoman Pat Barry, "are finding work in three to six weeks." Since last year 126 jobs have been landed through the program.
  • Fax It To 'Em

    Sensing cracks in the regime of President Hashemi Rafsanjani, a former Iranian diplomat is quietly organizing moderate Iranian exiles. His goal: to topple the mullahs with a fax revolution much as the Chinese dissidents attempted three years ago. Assad Homayoun, who was deputy chief of mission in the Iranian Embassy in Washington before the shah was deposed, has formed the Free Iran Committee to rally centrist Iranians in the United States and Europe. Homayoun hopes to flood Iran with foreign broadcasts, underground newspaper articles and faxes. The State Department had no comment.
  • The Hardest Sell

    When Robert Eaton takes over as the new head of Chrysler next year, he might want to sit down and talk to people like Roger Slade. A Washington, D.C., economist, Slade drove a 1986 Chrysler LeBaron for four years. His blunt assessment of the car? "It was dreadful" he says. "We had endless trouble with it." When he decided to buy a new car he looked again at some American models but ended up buying the higher-priced Nissan Infiniti. "Although some of the domestics-were rather good in actual performance," he says, "other kinds of considerations-like styling and the interior-were sadly lacking." Last month, for family reasons, Slade sold the Infiniti and didn't bother visiting American showrooms. He bought a Honda Acura Legend. Why? "The Japanese cars have superior quality," he says. ...