Newswire

Newswire

  • Strip Tease

    So did she or didn't she? The May issue of Playboy features a nude pictorial of 1982 Miss America Elizabeth Ward. But in an accompanying interview the former Miss Arkansas is less revealing when asked about a rumored affair with Bill Clinton. "Have I slept with this person?" Ward, 31, says to Playboy. "I don't believe that's anyone's business." After seeing the article three weeks ago, Ward released a statement through the Clinton campaign denying a romance. Clinton also denies any affair. His campaign chairman says his office won't discuss the matter further.
  • Hung On A Technicality

    Wanda Faye McCoy died with a secret. Roger Keith Coleman wished she could have told it. Now, he may die, too. ...
  • The Kurds Try Again

    This time it was Turkey. The Kurds, a people with no nation to call their Town, were once again in conflict with a government that rules them but cannot claim their loyalty. From mountain sanctuaries in neighboring Iraq, thousands of Kurdish guerrillas descended on southeastern Turkey, the ethnic heartland for which they seek independence. They attacked government offices and barracks across the region, and sympathizers in Istanbul killed two military officers. "This is war," said Prime Minister Suleyman Demirel. His forces counterattacked, fighting street to street in the Kurdish region and strafing suspected bases in Iraq. Nearly 100 people, including women and children, were killed before the government regained control at the weekend. Demirel has tried to appease the 10 million Turkish Kurds, whose brethren in Syria, Iraq and Iran also want independence. "We recognize the Kurdish reality," he has said. But Demirel refuses to discuss independence, and no one thinks the lull in...
  • Guess Who Came To Dinner

    A lot of Sidney Poitier's East Coast pals couldn't make it to Beverly Hills two weeks ago, so the American Film Institute brought Poitier to them. For the first time in its history, the AFI tossed a second party for its annual Life Achievement awardee last week, a black-tie dinner that included Whoopie Goldberg, Cicely Tyson, Ossie Davis and Ruby Dee. Deja vu? No, to Sir, with love, all over again.
  • Bad Blood

    The AIDS-awareness movement has finally hit Japan, but the country sure has selected some bizarre spokespersons to trumpet the cause. Japanese subways are currently plastered with creepy posters of Dracula saying,"I am afraid of AIDS." No doubt all blood sucking Japanese will be more careful now. Similar posters feature Frakenstein's monster, a mummy and a witch. "There is a fear of AIDS among the public," explains a spokesman for the Fuji televison network, which supplied the poters. "We thought Dracula was the best character to show the people's feelings."
  • Whats Wrong With Our Baby?

    While much of the world watched the Olympics, my husband and I witnessed an event that gave us as much joy as any medalist's parents: our baby came back to life. Molly's symptoms had baffled her doctors-more than 50 of them, many at a major university hospital, since mid-November. Why would an active and cheerful 17-month-old suddenly stop eating? Why would she stop walking and playing? When nothing showed up after three days of round-the-clock testing in December, we were sent home with instructions to pop a bottle of milk in Molly's mouth first thing in the morning instead of breast-feeding her, to give her vitamins and not pick her up as much. Was this meager advice the best modern medicine could do?Doctor's advice notwithstanding, I held her during the holidays as she continued to waste away. What was even more disconcerting was her behavior: she wanted nothing to do with toys, books, Christmas or her two older sisters."No!" she yelled whenever they came close.On Dec. 31, our...
  • Paging Dr. Bigmouth

    George Bush's top advisers are furious at White House physician Burton Lee for his public diagnosis of presidential stress-and his prescription of a chief-exec vacation. "We ought to sue him for malpractice," cracked a senior Bush official. Despite persistent rumors-said to originate with members of the Bush family that the president has continuing medical problems, Dr. Lee said after Bush's annual physical that he is in "perfect" health. The only problems: "mild degenerative osteoarthritis" of the hips and neck, along with stress. Bush plans several long weekends in Kennebunkport, Maine, starting next month because the campaign will prevent him from taking his usual summer vacation there. The White House scheduled one trip in early May. But campaign officials plan to veto it. It would be "impolitic, not to mention stupid," said one, to snub the media by skipping the White House correspondents' dinner that weekend.
  • One Nation, One Curriculum?

    In the last three years, 10-year-old Nick Lang's family has moved from Alaska to Colorado to Texas. For Nick, the moves !ant three very different schools in three very different districts. Some adjustment's were minor--studying Texas history instead of Colorado lore. But others were more taxing. "When we moved to Texas in January, the teacher expected every child to know their multiplication tables by heart," says Nick's mother, Roslyn. "In Denver, fourth graders hadn't memorized them yet. Nick started having stomachaches and didn't want to go to school." ...
  • Declaration Of Independence

    THE U.S.A. CANNOT TWIST OUR ARM. A placard in Iran? A billboard in Cuba? No, it's a new slogan currently being floated by the Likud party of Israel's Prime Minister, Yitzhak Shamir. With a crucial election coming on June 23, nationalism bordering on anti-Americanism is resurgent on Israel's right wing. It is the inevitable rejoinder to the Bush administration's refusal to guarantee $10 billion in loans to assist Soviet Jews until the Shamir government freezes Jewish settlements in the occupied territories. Shamir is also outraged at Washington's accusation that Israel transferred Patriot missile technology to China, which led to the humiliating arrival of American inspectors in Israel last week. Israel, which also gets $3 billion in outright aid each year from Washington, will look elsewhere for resettlement aid. "Jews [abroad] are calling me and saying not to fear the loan-guarantee issue," said Shamir. "They say they will arrange ... money and guarantees of their own." ...
  • Peri Picks

    No pain, no gain: that used to be the key rule for looking hip and cutting edge. But it's not true anymore. Now anyone can cultivate the downtown look in minutes--and without any blood or permanent skin damage. PERISCOPE surveys the country's latest crop of faux fashion accessories: Instant Steven Seagal! Big in Hollywood, where people are way too busy to grow their own hair.Just stick 'em on, then scrape 'em off. The look for today's models, who don't really want grinning panthers on their arms forever.Old reliable is back with a vengeance. It's a simple way to transform yourself, Cher style. But the really nice ones will cost you.Talk about eliminating that awful ouch-factor. Here's a helpful fashion tip: go for the double ring to really rattle Aunt Eunice.
  • The Bad Nows About Beef

    Before starting Jeremy Rifkin's new book Beyond Beef (353 pages. Dutton. $21), take a third of a pound of ground beef and shape it into a patty, handling it as little as possible so as not to toughen the meat. Broil it about four minutes on each side and place it on a fresh bun. Add ketchup, mustard or whatever you like. Then enjoy it slowly, savoring every bite. You're not going to want another hamburger for a long, long time. ...
  • A Quit-Now Drive That Worked

    It's been called the "people's vaccine," but it's no folk remedy. Proposition 99 is a brash popular initiative, adopted by California voters four years ago to combat the nation's leading cause of premature death. The measure created a range of programs to discourage smoking and to help people quit-and experience suggests that it worked. Though tobacco-related disease still kills more Californians than AIDS, crime, car accidents and illegal drugs combined, the state's smoking rate has fallen sharply since Proposition 99 took effect. Health officials from around the world are now taking note. Yet the program itself is under assault. Faced with a mammoth budget deficit, California Gov. Pete Wilson has scrapped the initiative's most visible component-an aggressive antismoking media campaign-and he's proposing further cuts in coming years. Health activists are fuming. "We've discovered the equivalent of an AIDS vaccine," says San Francisco heart researcher Stanton Glantz. "He wants to...
  • Hustles, Farces And Fantasies

    White Men Can't Jump. But they can make very entertaining movies, especially if the white man in question is writer/director Ron Shelton, creator of the wonderful "Bull Durham." His new comedy, with Wesley Snipes and Woody Harrelson as a couple of L.A. basketball hustlers whose partnership does not exclude hustling each other, has a fairly perfunctory plot (tension is supplied by two thugs trying to collect Harrelson's debts). But Shelton's strength is character, streetwise wit and funky, lived-in sexuality. Snipes, one of our most versatile young actors, gets to demonstrate his wonderful comic chops, and Harrelson, whose goofiness is part of his scam, partners him beautifully. Sweet and tangy Rosie Perez almost steals the show as the white boy's tippling girlfriend, who amasses an amazing almanac of facts in anticipation of winning a bundle on "Jeopardy!" Propelled by a hip, soulful soundtrack, packed with fast basketball action and fresh glimpses of an L.A. far off the 90210 map, ...
  • Punch Falls, And We Are Not Amused

    Life," wrote Malcolm Muggeridge, who was the eighth editor of Punch magazine, from l953 to 1957, "holds no more wretched occupation than trying to make the English laugh." If so, then a great burden of misery is about to be lifted from the back of Muggeridge's current successor, David Thomas. Unless a buyer can be found-which apparently would take a miracle on the order of resurrecting Robert Maxwell-the April 8 issue of the 150-year-old satircal weekly will be its last. ...
  • Trouble For Team Foley

    They're Washington's oddest power couple. He's the epitome of the congressional "go along to get along" ethos, a man whose button-down affability and plodding caution was the ticket to steady movement up the leadership ladder. She's the imperious and reclusive aide-decamp who made a legion of enemies as she helped him punch that ticket, a skilled carpenter whose sandals and baggy sundresses are more evocative of communes than caucuses. Tom and Heather Foley's unlikely partnership took them to the top in 1989 when they became master and mistress of the House-he as speaker and she as an unpaid but powerful chief of staff. He presided over politics and policy, she meted out the perks: coveted office space, choice parking and, most important, access to her husband. But she also oversaw the House bank and post office baronies now embroiled in scandal. The fallout has landed Team Foley in deep trouble. ...
  • Rudman: 'It's Time To Tell The Truth

    The calls came from all over the country. Would the senator run for president? Would he be Ross Perot's running mate? The latest political truth teller to strike a chord with the public is Sen. Warren Rudman, the New Hampshire Republican who announced last week he would not run again because of Congress's inability to deal with the budget deficit. Rudman shared his reflections with NEWSWEEK 's Eleanor Clift. Excerpts: ...
  • Baby, We Were Born To Last

    One of the drawbacks of being an icon is that life changes around you. Since Bruce Springsteen last released an album, the unassuming "Tunnel of Love," in 1987, a lot has passed. His marriage to actress Julianne Phillips, unsettled at the time of "Tunnel of Love," finally dissolved, both in the pages of People magazine and in real life. He married backup singer Patti Scialfa and dispatched his E Street Band, his constant musical companions since 1972. A longtime booster of his native New Jersey, he moved to a $14 million estate in Beverly Hills. Springsteen is now 42, settled down with two children: Evan James, 20 months, and Jessica Rae, 3 months. As one of his ex-musicians told The Boston Globe, "This is not the same guy whose every waking moment 17 years ago was rock and roll." ...
  • The Players

    Though the market for digital consumer products is only starting to take shape, the battlelines are drawn. Expect a struggle between computer firms trying to shrink their products Into consumer gizmos and electronics companies trying to make their appliances smarter. That could mean a new showdown between Japanese and Western manufacturers ...
  • Sorry, Wrong Zip Code

    Thousands of pubescent mall rats are affecting Brenda's sultry bangs and Dylan's killer squint, the one that seems to say: "I'm cool, wusspuss, and that's how I made it with Brenda." They're snapping up the official stuff, too: the "Beverly Hills, 90210" cosmetics and boxer shorts and sleepwear and autographed caps and fanzines and, at last count, nine quickie paperbacks. (The quickest: "LukeMania! Jason-Fever!" which was cranked out in exactly six days.) The Fox network's hit show about high-school angst El Lay style has also inspired a line of fashion dolls, zit-free if not quite anatomically correct. And beginning later this year, "90210"will beget the ultimate knockoff, which is, of course, a spinoff. Maybe three of them, in fact. ...