Newswire

Newswire

  • An Icy Night Is No Time To Wing It

    It was an airplane traveler's nightmare. After a long delay on the snowy runway at New York's La Guardia Airport and a turbulent, aborted takeoff, USAir Flight 405 abruptly plunged into the freezing waters of Flushing Bay. Passengers and crew, trapped in their seat belts, upside down and underwater, had to swim out through jagged, burning wreckage; 27 didn't survive. ...
  • Buzzwords

    All sports have their own distinct lingos. If you've been to the park or seaside lately, maybe you've heard all those Rollerbladers talking. Here's a translation:The real term for Rollerblading; what aficionados call the sport.An exceptionally fast skater.The burns and scrapes a fallen skater gets from sliding on unprotected flesh.A hopeless neophyte.A smooth, recently paved street. Great for skating.A really fast slalom run.
  • Set Up To Make A Killing

    His cruelty seems boundless, because for Abu Nidal no target is exempt. Such innocents as Jewish worshipers in Istanbul or families headed home from Rome at Christmas time have fallen far more often than his espoused enemies, the Israelis. But Abu Nidal saves the worst for his own followers. Escapees from his desert camp in Libya tell how hundreds of recruits deemed suspect have been tortured and buried alive by his organization. ...
  • Home Alone

    Now that she's split with Prince Andrew, will Sarah Ferguson hide out in a "safe house" befitting her royal title? King Hussein of Jordan has told Fergie she's more than welcome to seek refuge at Castlewood, his palatial estate near Windsor. The Yorks stayed there in 1990 during the construction of their glitzy Sunninghill estate--nicknamed "Southyork," after the sprawling Ewing ranch in "Dallas." Queen Elizabeth reportedly wants the duchess to remain at Sunninghill so she can retain some measure of control over the feuding couple and their children. Fergie is said to be mulling over Hussein's offer.
  • Cash For Old Clunkers

    Whaddya bid me for this 1971 Ford? Forget the Blue Book. The value of this beauty depends on how much choking black smoke blasts out of its rusted tailpipe-and the more the better. If the Bush administration has its way, within the next six months there will be a thriving free market in dirty old cars: companies that pollute the air could buy them, junk them, and earn a "pollution credit" for saving however much smog-and ozone-forming exhaust the cars would have belched out before they died. The company-anything from a utility to a paint factory-would subtract the amount of the credit from the quantity of air pollution they're required to cut under the 1990 Clean Air Act. The idea of this and other market-based approaches to environmental cleanup is to get the most clean for the least green. "Lots of little smokestacks on the highway are equivalent to one big smokestack," says energy-policy analyst Will Schroeer of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. "But it will be cheaper to...
  • The Divine Detective Strikes Again

    Sam Spade he's not. And unlike G. K. Chesterton's. Father Brown or television's Murphy, James McClosky has never been or but the seminarian detective has earned startling reputation freeing falsely convicted prisoners he has just signed a movie deal for his life story. Now McCloakey is seeking new testimony to save 'Roger Keith Coleman from Virginia's electric chair and, last week, he scored another victory. Thanks largely to McCloskey's efforts, Judge Florence-Marie Cooper of the County Superior Clarence Chance and Benny Powell free after serving 17 years in prison on a bogus murder charge. She also apologized: "Nothing can return to you the years irretrievably lost" ...
  • The Next Revolution

    All of us talk to our computers-but most of what we say is unprintable, and we certainly don't expect them to talk back to us. Machines like HAL-the computer in "2001" that could actually converse with its human masters-are science fiction, right? Mmmaaaybe not. ...
  • The Cat And The Bat Are Back

    As Catwoman, the caped crusader's feline foil, Michelle Pfeiffer does a lot of kicking, clawing and roof-hopping in "Batman Returns," out this June. Once again, Michael Keaton is Batman, sheathed in a newly designed suit of midnight armor. Danny DeVito returns as the nefarious Penguin, who is running for mayor of Gotham City and driving patrician citizen Bruce Wayne batty. But it's Catwoman who purrsues our high-flying hero. Holy Kitty Litter!
  • Night Of The Living Dead

    It was a chilly spring night in Paris, and the international fashion crowd looked uncomfortable and out of place as it piled into the Salvation Army's secondhand furniture shop. The occasion was the hippest happening of the season: Belgian avant-garde designer Martin Margiela's fall fashion show. Editors and buyers settled their Chanel-clad shapes onto overstuffed sofas and bulky dressing tables, waiting for fashion's version of Theater of the Absurd. A ragtag Salvation Army band, dressed in bits of mismatched clothes, marched through the shop's aisles, followed by a parade of models in wrinkled jackets, baggy-kneed pants and coats with inner linings hanging down from unfinished hems. The audience applauded wildly for Margiela's frayed, unraveling styles. Shabby chic had arrived. ...
  • Boris Bashing

    Is Boris Yeltsin wearing too many political hats these days? Disaffected Russian legislators, concerned over his imperiousness and the country's disastrous economy, may oust him as prime minister during next week's meeting of the Congress of People's Deputies. "I wouldn't rule it out," said an aide to the powerful Parliament Speaker Ruslan Khasbulatov. Yeltsin, who is Russian president and acting defense minister in addition to being prime minister, is expected to weather the offensive.
  • Jumping Ship?

    Could a former top Honda executive be defecting to a U.S. automaker? When he resigned as the Honda Motor Corp's executive vice president for manufacturing and R&D two weeks ago, Shoichiro Irimajiri said it was for health reasons. But rumors are swirling in Japanese business circles that Irimajiri is about to join one of America's Big Three auto companies. Tough, smart and fluent in English thanks to years of experience running Honda's U.S. operation, Irimajiri, 52, was one of the company's most powerful execs and widely viewed as heir apparent to the Honda presidency. If Irimajiri jumps ship, it would be the most significant defection ever from Japan Inc.
  • The Keepers Of The Rules

    OVERLAND PARK, KANS.-One of the battery of physical therapists who put Steve Palermo through an average of five hours of pain, five days a week, says he is the first patient she has had who, looking back on the episode that broke his body, insists he would do it again. Of course he would. He was just enforcing the rules. He is, after all, an umpire. ...
  • Losing Ground

    Consider some statistics on life and death in America: ...
  • Simon Spys:Real Or False.?

    The "new" Neil Simon is still with us in Jake's Women. The new Simon is the one who doesn't put on the false nose of the gagster to hide from his own experience and pain. Jake is a writer in midlife crisis. His marriage is on the rocks and he's never gotten over the death of his young first wife. Matters are thrashed out in a series of conversations, real and imagined, with seven women, including his wife, Maggie (Helen Shaver), his dead first wife, Julie (Kate Burton), his daughter Molly (Tracy Pollan) and his sister Karen (Brenda Vaccaro). ...
  • 'Jim Brown' Is Still Dead, Isn't He?

    Outside the Kingston courthouse, lawyer Tom Tavares-Finson smiled sarcastically behind his racing-driver sunglasses last week. A coroner's inquest had just given up trying to decide how and why Tavares Finson's client, the "don dadda" (father don) of West Kingston's gangland slums, died. "If you believe Jim Brown just burned to death, by accident, in his jail cell, you'll believe in the tooth fairy," said the lawyer. "The only thing I can tell you for sure-and I saw the body-is that Jim Brown is dead." ...
  • The Great Impersonator

    Satire," George S. Kaufman once said, "is what closes Saturday night." Well, not in the art world, where the likes of Cindy Sherman, David Salle and Sherrie Levine have been sending up other people's art since artists started moussing their ponytails. Trouble is, their technically adroit and philosophically au courant work isn't very funny. Now along comes Japanese photographer Yasumasa Morimura,40,redoing Rembrandt, Manet, Rossetti, van Gogh and others, and declaring that "My works are the paintings that the artists would have created if they had been alive today.' "Right: if they'd apprenticed in the atelier of John Cleese and studied art history with Woody Allen. Ten of Morimura's beat works are on view at Chicago's Museum of Contemporary Art (through April 19 before traveling to Pittsburgh)' ' Art hasn't been this much fun since Rubens. ...
  • Fair Trade?

    For some public officials, one governments paycheck is as good as another's--sometimes better. Take Texas state Sen. Rodney Ellis and Houston Port Commissioner Michael Solar. They've signed on with Mexico to promote the North American Free Trade Agreement, earning $15,000 each a year and $3,000 a month in travel expenses. As a state senator, Ellis is paid $7,200 a year and $85 a day in expenses when the legislature is in session. Port Commissioner Solar is unsalaried. Calling the possibility of conflict of interest "farfetched," Ellis said he'd abstain from any vote involving Mexico.
  • Why Its Not Just Paranoia

    When the topic of a Plan for black genocide comes up, white Americans usually demand a straightforward disavowal: "You can't believe in that sort of thing?" The scene invoked is out of a 1950s movie, and just as silly: five wild-eyed bad guys in lab coats--something only truly hysterical Negroes would swallow. The ideological wagons are drawn into a circle with sensible mainstream American reason inside, threatened but valiant, and the crazy assault of black-American paranoia without. But to paraphrase my mother: we can't always be wrong. If some African-Americans feel that a secret white American cabal is trying to kill us off, there might just be some reasons. ...
  • A Hymn To Adoption--Or Is It?

    A door opens and schoolchildren burst into the sunlight, laughing and tumbling down the steps. A father helps his son tuck in his shirt. Little ones cavort in Halloween costumes. These charming sight bites of childhood are part of a new 30-second TV commercial. But beneath the video honey, many people charge, there's a stinging message. "All of these children have one thing in common," an announcer says. "All of them were unplanned pregnancies ... that could have ended in abortion. But their parents toughed it out, listened to their hearts and discovered that sometimes the beat things in life aren't planned. Life. What a beautiful choice." ...
  • This Is The Now World Order?

    Poor Somalia-first a battleground for the cold war, now a testing ground for the new world order. A United Nations delegation of 20 people from more than a dozen countries descended into Mogadishu last week. Their mission: to find ways to monitor a fragile cease-fire in the Somali capital and to concoct a plan for delivering emergency food to a land torn by rival warlords and gangs. Their hope: that the U.N. flag would protect them. ...