Newswire

Newswire

  • The Boom In Annuities

    For a brief, shining moment, I thought President Bush was going to save annuity buyers from themselves. I'm speaking of the 10 seconds of belief he gave to a proposal, offered after his State of the Union Message, for changing the way annuities are taxed. ...
  • Five Weeks And Counting

    This season, baseball's spring training camps are like those awkward mixers on the first day of college: everybody's new. It was a remarkable winter for trades and unspeakably lucrative free-agent defections. A look at some of the more remodeled clubs: A decent pitching staff gets better with Belcher and Swindell. Dibble, America's most infamous serial beaner, is very excited about it. Uh-oh.Made the league's biggest killing with Bonilla, Saberhagen and Murray. But this could just plunge them one rung deeper into Head-Case Hell.If aging stars like Morns and Winfield don't help, the owners should ice the field, get a puck and pretend baseball never existed.Jefferies, McReynolds and Joyner will definitely ring up the scoreboard. Of course, "Hitting doesn't win the pennant; pitching does."
  • A Minaret Over Manhattan

    The most impressive new house of worship in New York City sits askew the corner of Third Avenue and 96th Street, where the high-rises of the Upper East Side begin to give way to the housing projects and tenements of Spanish Harlem. It is a big, square granite building, with a vast copper-covered dome, and atop the dome is the thin golden crescent of a nearly new moon. It is a mosque, and for nearly a million Muslims in and around New York City it is--apart from small converted storefronts and brownstones scattered here and there-the first one they have ever had. ...
  • Arne's Double Life

    Speaking of letting down your hair, wasn't that the button-down art dealer Arne Glimeher mamboing his heart out at New York's tatty Roseland the other night? At the premiere party for "The Mambo Kings," first-time film director Glimeher, along with stars Armand Assante and Antonio Banderas, boogied on-stage in a fevered rendition of the classic "Guantanamera. " It was only a few blocks from the pristinely elegant Pace Gallery, where Glimcher represents such blue-chip artists as Richard Serra and Julian Schnabel, as well as the estates of Mark Rothko and Jean Dubuffet, but it might as well have been the other side of the moon. This is the double life of Arne Glimcher. ...
  • Running Against Fidel

    Cuba also will be free." So said an op-ed piece in last week's Miami Herald. It was no new prediction: Fidel Castro's political demise was assured when the Soviet empire collapsed, though estimates of how long he can hold out range from weeks to years. Still, the byline was eye-catching. It read: By GEORGE Bush. The president denied an accusation by Republican challenger Patrick Buchanan that the White House is conspiring with Castro to repress Cuban militants in Miami. He listed Castro's recent "gross violations" of human rights, adding: "We have no intention of agreeing to a normal relationship" with him. The Florida primary is next week, so the context was clear. Not so obvious in Bush's riposte was the question of whether the strategy of isolating and slowly choking Cuba can withstand both the rigors of the primary season and clamor from analysts that it needs an overhaul. ...
  • Unholy Acts?

    Is Father Junipero Serra--founder of California's first Roman Catholic missions-worthy of sainthood? Native Americans oppose the canonization of the Franciscan priest because, they say, he mistreated Indians at his missions. Recent findings by archeologists studying Indian remains at an early mission appear to bolster their case. The remains show "serious malnutrition and physical abuse," says archeologist Richard Carrico. "[Serra's] no saint; he's just your run-of-the-mill Spaniard," says anthropologist Florence Shipek, who also examined the remains. But Carrico believes other priests serving under Father Serra were responsible for the abuse.
  • Now You See Them...

    Book publishers are creatures of habit. In the fall, they issue their art books and other coffee-table fare in time for Christmas. In the spring they publish books about baseball. In summer come thrillers, tell-all bios and other beach reading. And in February, they publish books by and about African-Americans. ...
  • Diller's Hollywood Shuffle

    For 30 years Barry Diller has been shaking up the entertainment industry. Among other things, he's credited with inventing the movie of the week, and he brought to television the groundbreaking mini-series, "Roots." And then there's Bart Simpson. But probably no move of Diller's has rocked Hollywood more than his announcement last week that he was resigning as chairman of Fox Inc. after more than seven years at the helm. ...
  • Set Adrift On Memory Bliss

    I got girls, girls, girls, girls, girls, girls on my mind," sings David Byrne, normally considered one of pop's headier longhairs, on his coyly titled new album, "Uh-Oh." In this year of scaling down expectations, Byrne has found a way to lower ours of him. "Uh-Oh "completes his transition from doyen of oversophisticated urban alienation to quaint eccentric. No longer a potential psycho killer, he's now the guy who tells poo-poo jokes to the kids. ...
  • Executive Anxiety Edition

    The CW shocked, shocked, that politics have gone so negative, and will not dignify such scurrilous charges with arrows. It covers the United Way campaign instead. ...
  • Times Of Enlightenment

    Has the Good Gray Lady gone lavender? Not exactly, but a forthcoming series in the gay magazine The Advocate will chronicle a new sensitivity at The New York Times to the concerns of gays and lesbians, both inside and outside the paper. Though it will discuss past incidents of homophobia, Advocate sources say the piece will focus on the current "lavender enlightenment" in the newsroom. Due in April, the series follows The Advocate's current cover story, "Vanity Fairies," on the power and influence of gays at the Conde Nast empire.
  • High Noonan

    White House officials insist Secretary Of State Jam Baker has no plans to resign and take over George Bush's floundering campaign. But Newsweek has learned that Bush has been discussing political strategy with Baker for months. To quiet the clamor for Baker from GOP officials, campaign aides last week put out the word that the president had solicited Baker's advice. But senior Bush advisers say the talks are nothing new. "They've been talking all along," says a top aide ... Another sign of desperation: speechwriter Pan Noonan will join the campaign immediately. Noonan had planned to come aboard in July.
  • Political Ambitions, Personal Choices

    Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton was widely considered the Democrats' best hope to recapture the White House. But his momentum was stalled by allegations about infidelity and his Vietnam-era avoidance of the draft. A tireless campaigner, Clinton-nicknamed "Elvis" by the press-has been battling back. In the midst of those crises, he spoke with NEWSWEEK'S Eleanor Clift. Excerpts: ...
  • It's The Juice That Counts

    The hotblooded The Mambo Kings opens backstage at a nightclub in Batista's Cuba with curses, threats and a throat-slashing. You might think, for a moment, that this fever-pitch melodramatic prelude is parody-a movie within a movie, or a dream sequence that will soon give way to reality. Then it quickly becomes clear that this is the reality of "The Mambo Kings": heightened passions and melodramatic emotions propelled by the beat of the mambo, the rumba, the cha-cha-cha. First-time director Arne Glimcher has boldly taken Oscar Hijuelos's Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, "The Mambo Kings Play Songs of Love"-a rumination on the brief rise and long fall of two immigrant Cuban musicians-and pared and transformed it into a fleet and sensual musical melodrama. Exuberant, melancholic and sometimes narratively messy, Glimcher and screenwriter Cynthia Cidre don't always cross their t's and dot their i's. But in the face of such juice, who cares? ...
  • Life Among The Ruins

    The cease-fire is almost bleaker than the war itself For six months last year, ancient hatreds raged across Yugoslavia. Soldiers from the Serbian-dominated Federal Army rained rockets on Croatian strongholds like the medieval walled city of Dubrovnik, untouched during the frequent wars of earlier times. Savage house-to-house fighting emptied whole villages. By the time the United Nations established an uneasy truce on Jan. 3, perhaps 10,000 people lay dead, most of them Croats. Refugees numbered 600,000. Both sides told blood-curdling tales of atrocities. ...
  • For The Love Of Robotics

    Brooks Coleman is showing off his robotic arm, a knockoff of the device first deployed on NASA's shuttle. He tugs on a bit of fishing line and the different parts of the robotic arm go through their paces, twisting and grabbing. But there are serious differences between Coleman's arm and NASA's arm. NASA's arms are made for deployment in space. Coleman's arm is being deployed in his bedroom--an explosion of papers, old clothes and electronic gear that gives you an idea of what it must have looked like inside Fibber McGee's closet. Another difference: NASA's first robotic arm cost $80 million, but this one cost about 50 bucks, and is made mostly out of Styrofoam and balsa. Oh-another difference between the things that Brooks makes and the things that fly in space: Brooks's flimsy models almost always work. ...
  • Fact Checking

    When big changes occur at a huge media conglomerate, communication can be the first thing to go. After last week's news that Time Warner co-CEO Nick Nicholas had been ousted in a power play by co-CEO Steve Ross, rumors about Ross's health began to fly. People magazine correspondents in a far-flung bureau heard that Ross-now undergoing chemotherapy for prostate cancer-had died. They passed the word to Time correspondents, who frantically called the New York office to get the details. Instead, they heard it was just a bad rumor.
  • On The Run With America's Top Pay Cop

    If management pay expert Graef Crystal has learned anything in his crusade against fat-cat chief executives, it's that it doesn't pay to bite the hand that feeds you. Last June he quit Fortune magazine in a huff, citing interference from the executive suite at parent corporation Time Warner. Now Financial World, which had gleefully snapped up the sharp-tongued Crystal, has shown him the door. Although ad pages at the magazine dropped roughly 30 percent last year, Financial World chairman Mark Meagher denies he was under pressure from advertisers to fire the CEO-bashing Crystal. "It was an accumulation of things that led us to review whether this guy was an asset or a liability," Meagher says. ...
  • San Francisco

    An unidentified paper boy who scaled the teetering outside staircase of a Telegraph Hill building that was inching down a 160-foot cliff following heavy rains. He delivered papers to five evacuated apartments. The building was demolished days later.
  • Deadly Lessons

    Kids With Guns Are Setting Off An Arms Race Of Their Own Across The Country--As A Double Murder In A New York High School Showed. Are Schools Doomed To Become Free-Fire Zones?