Newswire

Newswire

  • Peru:Into The Cross-Fire

    Late last month 20 members of Peru's mysterious guerrilla group, Shining Path, stormed an experimental farm in Huaral, 50 miles north of Lima, the country's capital. They executed three visiting agronomists from Japan. They blew up research laboratories. Then they escaped. It seemed a senseless act, almost guaranteed to alienate the very peasants guerrillas normally court. But to Shining Path, the agronomists were imperialists propping up the "fascist" government of President Alberto Fujimori. The attack showed the rebels can strike freely near the capital. It was also intended to weaken Peru's links to Japan, which pledged to help Fujimori, the son of Japanese immigrants: since the attack, Japan has recalled 52 agricultural engineers. ...
  • Mias: Help From Hanoi

    On a hillside in Vietnam's Quang Binh province, American experts and Vietnam laborers have dug a massive pit. They work shovelfuls of dirt through fine, wire-mesh sifters. In three days, they turn up only bullets, metal fragments and aircraft springs. Their mission: to find proof that a Navy pilot was killed when he flew his A-7 attack jet into the mountain in 1968. "It's very grueling work," says Maj. Brenda Bradley, 42, her brown T shirt soaked with sweat. And there is no guarantee of success. Says Sara Collins, the search team's archeologist: "Sometimes there is simply not enough left to make an ID." ...
  • Rebuilding From The Rubble

    A tangle of tree-high weeds and trash has overtaken what remains of the houses that stood at 11th Street and Bowman Avenue in East St. Louis, Ill. Ever since the city ran out of money for trash collection four years ago, people have been dumping garbage on this block. Neither people nor cars pass through here anymore. Broken glass and truck tires spill out onto crossroads, and the weeds are now taking over the streets as well. ...
  • Going From Jazz To Riches

    Three years ago, Andrzej Gasiorowski was a doctor making $30 a month in southern Poland. Boguslaw Bagsik was an elementary-school music teacher earning even less. Then they discovered they shared a love of jazz--and capitalist ambition. Starting in 1989, Gasiorowski, 32, and Bagsik, 28, formed one of the most extraordinary business empires in Eastern Europe. The firm, Art B (for "artistic business"), rocketed into the stratosphere of high finance, reporting profits of $30 million on revenues of $300 million last year. ...
  • Going Under

    ASSETS BUSINESS MONTH PSYCHOLOGY TODAY CALIFORNIA MAGAZINE SAVVY WOMAN COOK'S 7 DAYS DISCOVER SMART EGG SOUTHPOINT FAME SYLVIA PORTER'S PERSONAL GOLF ILLUSTRATED FINANCE HEALTH TAXI HOMEOWNER TENNIS ILLUSTRATED MANHATTAN, INC. 1001 HOME IDEAS MEMORIES UNIQUE MEN'S LIFE VENTURE MODEL WIGWAM MOXIE WOMAN
  • Sweet Dreams Or Nightmare?

    When officer Reg Browne walked into the room, 83-year-old Mildred Coats was stretched out on her bed, clutching a cheery birthday card in her left hand. Several towels had been placed gently around her head to absorb the blood from spilling from eight gun shot wounds. Anticipating a heated domestic dispute, Browne had donned a bulletproof vest before leaving the sheriff's office in Hurricane, Utah. But he didn't get a chance to use it. The old woman's daughter, 57-year-old Ilo Grundburg, was waiting calmly to hand him a written confession. "I didn't kill her because I didn't love her," Grundburg explained. "I loved her very much." ...
  • The Ultimate Runaway Best Seller

    It's the weirdest summer-reading hit in memory. When Derek Humphry's Final Exit: The Practicalities of the Self-Deliverance and Assisted Suicide for the Dying (192 pages. Hemlock Society. $16.95) makes its first appearance in The New York Times best-seller list next Sunday, in the category of Advise, How-to and Miscellaneous, it will already be No. 1. ...
  • Ordeal In Wichita: One Woman' Story

    Mrs. F is a 33-year-old Virginia housewife, married for 10 years to her high-school boyfriend, a military officer. They have a 3-year-old daughter. After two miscarriages last year, she found out she was pregnant again in January. But at 26 weeks, her doctor gave her whored news: a sonogram showed the left side of the baby's heart wasn't formed correctly and there was no chance of survival. The only medical option was a heart transplant, estimated to have a one-in-400 chance of success. Mrs. F and her husband decided to terminate the pregnancy at the Wichita clinic. Here is her account. ...
  • Scandal Value

    Like Pete Rose, Pee-wee Herman is learning that a scandal can sometimes enhance your commercial value. How else to explain the numerous requests toy stores have been fielding for Pee-wee dolls, mugs , buttons and T-shirts? Most stores stopped restocking Pee-wee merchandise well over a year ago. But after Pee-weegate broke two weeks ago, places like Detroit's Children's Palace have sold out their remaining four-foot-tall Pee-wee dolls at $7.99 a pop. If it's windows are any indication, one New York shop suddenly carries only Pee-wee merchandise. You might call it Pee-Wee's Revenge:some stores have hiked prices on everything from talking Pee-wee dolls to "Chairries" based on props from Pee-wee's canceled TV show.
  • All Dressed Up

    With Mom gone and Sis still mourning her late husband, the hostess chores for Monte Carlo's haute chic Red Cross Ball fell to an unlikely member of the Grimaldi family. Yet Princess Stephanie, whose style runs more to the metallic garb of disco punk, looked dazzlingly regal as she danced with her brother, Albert, in an elegantly draped Yves Saint Laurent number. What's more, the princess turned pop singer, whose new album (titled "Stephanie") has just reached American shores, seemed to be having a ball.
  • Buzzwords

    Ahead of scheduleDispatcher code for "shut up." Usage: "1030-it, bus 20, you're clogging the airwaves."A new driver who is slow and makes a lot of mistakes.BusAn old busA bus driver telling the dispatcher he's lost.Fare evader; a.k.a. skidder, skipper.Passengers
  • Yes, Sir, That's My Baby

    Acting once again on its long-held belief that one piece of bad taste deserves another, Spy magazine this month guffaws in the face of Pregnancy as Art. Its September issue spoofs pregger-than-thou Demi Moore's August Vanity Fair cover---by putting her husband, Bruce Willis, on its cover in the same tetanically gravid state. It took three days to electronically weld Willis's mug onto a male model's bod, then stretch the torso to globular proportions. "I'm expecting some time next spring," smirks Willis. Did Spy ask him to pose? "No," says a top editor. "It's just a very well-built young man with the requisite hairiness." And a one-man argument for Norplant.
  • Now, Even The 'Good Guys' Look Bad.

    It was easy to miss the latest bombshell in the BCCI scandal. Last week everyone focused on the Senate subcommittee hearings, where Price Waterhouse--recently lionized for uncovering massive fraud at the Bank of Credit and Commerce International--was pummeled by BCCI's former chief financial officer, who accused the accounting firm of ignoring trading losses that led to the bank's demise. But a far darker story emerged from the fine print of documents filed with the subcommittee. According to these exhibits, five rulers of the United Arab Emirates used their connections to BCCI to get sizable loans from the bank, some, apparently, paying no interest or principal--at least through last year. ...
  • Are You A Mass Murderer, Too?

    The dateline:"Milwaukee....July 1991." The copy: "They were drugged and dragged across the room..... Their legs and feet were bound together.... Their struggles and cries went unanswered...Then they were slaughtered and their heads sawn off...Their body parts were refrigerated to be eaten later...Their bones were discarded with the trash." An over-the-top ad for a quickie paperback on the Jeffrey Dahmer case? No, an ad produced by a Washington-based animal rights group called People for the Ethical Treatment of Animals. "If this leaves a bad taste in your mouth," the ad concludes, with an obvious nod at the grisly Milwaukee murders, "become a vegetarian." ...
  • Trading In Glass Houses

    In America's kitchens, Vitro is an unknown name. But as the prospect of free trade forces Mexican companies to change or die, those days if anonymity are about to be over. Last week the Mexican glassmaker signed a tentative $800 million joint venture with Corning Inc., the American housewares giant, that will put Mexican-made Crisa glassware and Cien crystal in department stores around the world. The merger is a highly visible example of the changes that the free-trade pact with Mexico will bring. But another deal involving Vitro underscores the problems Mexico may have in trying to abandon some age-old habits on its way to becoming a larger player in the global economy. In a case that has shaken Mexico's financial industry, the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission is accusing three former employees and two other Mexicans of insider trading--leaving many Mexicans convinced that Uncle Sam wants to teach them a harsh lesson about U.S. law before free trade becomes a reality. ...
  • How Yesterday Saw Tomorrow

    The roaring '20s didn't last longer than any other decade, but after the exhibition "The 1920s: Age of the Metropolis," you'd swear it was an eternity. This vastly ambitious show at The Montreal Museum of Fine Arts is a huge, clanking machine: 700-odd paintings, prints, photographs, posters, architectural models, drawings, chairs, teapots, cigarette cases, a Bugatti automobile and a De Havilland 60X Moth airplane fill up the entire museum, evoking the jazz age in three prime capitals--Berlin, Paris, and New York. The images and objects in this immovable feast (the show closes on Nov. 10) make a rich but mostly stew. From whorehouse to Bauhaus, the show touches on decadence and utopianism, dada and constructivism, art deco and De Stijl, communism and cafe life. It is an age in which nothing was quite what it seemed: a side table looks like a high-rise, a cocktail shaker like a dirigible, a woman like a man. ...
  • So You Want To Be A Madam

    A how-to course on the escort business stretches the definition of the "service economy." But Sydney Biddle Barrows has never worried about what people think. The so-called "Mayflower Madam," a direct descendant of Pilgrims, was busted seven years ago for running a high-priced New York call-girl operation. Now she is redefining "adult education" with a road show of one-night seminars on the escort business. Barrows denies she is promoting prostitution-"but if people are going to do it, I'd rather they do it right." Besides, she says with a flippancy that almost makes you forget she has a criminal record, "if you don't negotiate money for a specific sex act, you're not committing prostitution." ...
  • Beyond The Cutting Edge

    Once again a new edge is busily being carved in Berkeley. It's the end of the first decade of personal computers. Music is just a mass of digits. The only reality worth talking about is virtual. And the science of the moment is chaos. Now, working out of a Bay Area mansion, a small crew is hoping to lead the way to-and profit from-the new era is just ahead. Their vehicle is a magazine called Mondo 2000. And if, as Bob Dylan wrote in another context, something is happening here but you don't know what it is, well, they intend to tell you. ...
  • That Word Won't Hunt

    When Robert Strauss arrives in Moscow as U.S. envoy, he wants to be able to render expressions like "that dog won't hunt" into Russian (Periscope, Aug. 12). Here is some Russian slang he might find useful, with literal translations. ...
  • Edna And Bonna And Lynda

    Cartoonist, novelist, National Public Radio commentator and now playwright Lynda Barry has few illusions about her theatrical sophistication. "The Good Times Are Killing Me" is her first play, "and I proved it by writing 27 scenes in the first act." Her main character steps forward to tell parts of the story not as a tip of the hat to "our Town" but because "I didn't know how to do it without a narrator yet." But Barry, 35, also has few inhibitions. She just jumps in and does it--whether "it" be writing, drawing the faux-naif "Ernie Pook's Comeek" (which now appears in 57 papers) or just singing for the hell of it. "I think I sing great," she says. "Not everyone agrees. For some stupid reason, in America singing is not allowed unless you're a professional, except for "Happy Birthday." It's a shame how much judgement is put on the creative urge in this culture. So nobody sings, nobody draws. We can eat, and we can be entertained." Typical Lynda Barry: pessimism undercut by high...