Newswire

Newswire

  • Capital Gridlock

    It was the kind of week that only a C-Spanjunkie could enjoy. Eighty-one House Republicans demanded immediate tax cuts to boost the economy. President Bush opposed their planand urged Congress to adjourn. A day later Bush decided he liked the tax cuts "enthusiastically"--and demanded that Congress pass them right away. House Speaker Thomas Foley called the bluff, offering a tax debate after Thanksgiving. Then Senate Republican leader Bob Dole declared that Bush didn't really want a tax vote after all. Finally, after a week of round-the-clock rancor, Congress packed up and went home until January-and financial markets around the world breathed a sigh of relief. ...
  • Pipeline To Riyadh:The Go-Between

    May 7,1991: It was an uncomfortable moment for his royal highness, Prince Bandar bin Sultan bin Abdel Aziz. Secretary of State James Baker was angry, and he didn't hide it. Bandar, Riyadh's ambassador in Washington, had promised the White House and Capitol Hill during the gulf crisis that Saudi Arabia would help launch a Mideast peace process afterward, if only President Bush would defeat Saddam Hussein. ...
  • Asia Ascending

    If present economic growth continues, Japanese production in 50 years will exceed that of the United States. Due to Japan's smaller population, individual Japanese will have incomes three and a half times larger than Americans'. PER CAPITA GNP COUNTRY 1991 2041 Japan $24,254 $122,658 U.S.A. $21,860 $35,760 China $296 $5,842 FROM INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND AND NEWSWEEK ESTIMATES (1990 DOLLAR
  • Case No. 91-5482 Comes To Trial

    It won't be quite as momentous as the Clarence Thomas-Anita Hill hearings, but it promises to be just as lurid. After eight months of legal haggling and journalistic theater, this year's Trial of the Century is finally scheduled to begin. At stake in the William Kennedy Smith rape case is the credibility of one woman and the liberty of one man. Is she telling the truth about what happened that night at the Kennedy waterfront compound in Palm Beach? Or is he the victim of a vicious lie? A classic courtroom dilemma, but one that has been overtaken, somewhat disingenuously, by Bigger Questions: Will this be the beginning of the end for Uncle Ted? Might this change the way American society views date rape? Either way, Case No. 91-5482-the trial of the State of Florida v. William Kennedy Smith-will be the most-watched legal proceeding in American history. The Courtroom Television Network will cover it gavel to gavel on cable (except for commercials), providing feeds to CNN, the regular...
  • 'Bush And His Aides Are Criminals'

    Ali Akbar Mohtashemi is the "iron mullah" of Iran, a radical disciple of the late Ayatollah Khomeini. He helped found the Hizbullah Islamic fundamentalist group in Lebanon and sent irregular Iranian forces there to aid it. A former interior minister and current member of Iran's Parliament, or Majlis, Mohtashemi is probably the West's most implacable foe in the Middle East. He met for two hours last week with Ray Wilkinson, NEWSWEEK'S Cairo bureau chief Excerpts: ...
  • Vanishing Act

    Top officials in Washington fear the possibility of another security scandal at the U.S. Embassy in Moscow. NEWSWEEK has learned that an American engineer privy to the secret blueprints of the old embassy on Moscow's ring road-damaged in a mysterious fire last spring-recently disappeared. Warren Clayton, 55, who was supervising repairs at the 10-story stucco structure for Bechtel, was fired and told to leave the Soviet Union by Nov. 9. ...
  • Shaming The Stock Pros

    It's often said that a monkey throwing darts could pick stocks as well as expensive market gurus. But what about everyday people, like retired schoolteacher Betty Taylor, 68, of Overland k, Kans.? When she first joined an investment club, Taylor didn't know a thing about stocks. Today, the performance of her family's investment club-a 37 percent annual average return over four year&-would put a money manager to shame. ...
  • Old Enough To Get Fired...

    By law, accepting early retirement must be completely voluntary. But as Richard Rathemacher recently told a federal jury in New Jersey, his departure from IBM after 30 years was anything but. The former systems-engineering manager said his troubles began in 1985 when a new branch manager passed him over for a promotion, saying he wanted "new young blood" in the job. The next year Rathemacher was transferred to selling mainframe computers--an area for which he had no training. Soon, he says, he was told that his next evaluation would be unsatisfactory--something he should consider when weighing IBM's early-retirement offer. Rathemacher signed a letter saying he was thinking about it, but only under duress. During the next few months, he was stripped of his management post and eventually sent to an abandoned branch office in Tinton Falls, N.J., where he sat alone at the end of the 10,000-square-foot space. "I would come in there in the morning, turn on the lights and sit there all day...
  • The New Oral Tradition

    If you log endless hours behind the wheel of a car or on a stationary bicycle, you've probably heard a lot of good books lately. The audio-book business is thriving, with annual sales approaching $1 billion. Before the mid-'80s, when publishers woke up to the boom in portable cassette players and automobile tape decks, it scarcely existed. Since then, business has grown so quickly that there has been almost no market research. "What we find," says Leslie Nadell, director of publicity, promotion and advertising at Random House Audio Publishing, "is that once people have listened to one they become instant converts." (Best customers: public libraries.) Some bibliophiles are uncomfortable with the genre, since most books are recorded in condensed form. But professional audio abridgers often do a remarkably good job, and authors get to vet the manuscripts. Increasingly, new books and tapes are appearing simultaneously. Herewith, some recent examples, now playing at your local bookstore,...
  • A Tv King's Rough Passage

    One afternoon last June dozens of Hollywood eminences gathered in a Century Plaza Hotel ballroom for the annual Women in Film Crystal Award luncheon, honoring prominent filmmakers. As the guests sat around linen-draped tables, Glenn Close began introducing VIPs seated in three rows on the dais: directors Garry and Penny Marshall, actress Jessica Tandy, "Cosby Show" coproducer Marcy Carsey. One chair remained conspicuously unoccupied. Suddenly, a spotlight shone on the corner of the stage, and in came Brandon Tartikoff, former NBC wunderkind, who had just been appointed chairman of Paramount Pictures. It was an entrance fit for a Hollywood mogul-but to some, it rang a sour note. "This was about women in film-not Brandon Tartikoff," says one guest who was on the dais. Tartikoff says the entrance was orchestrated by the women's group: "It was embarrassing for me as well,"he says. ...
  • Pick A Card

    Japanese women are not amused by a popular board game called Human Trash--Snicker, Snicker. The players draw cards depicting women in swimsuits and other attire. Each card has a point value according to the age, occupation and sexual experience of the woman on it. The object of the game is to get rid of "trash" (a bar girl, say), but this costs money. Draw an "ugly actress" and you can elect to pay for her plastic surgery. Pick a pregnancy card and lose a turn-and pay for an abortion. When members of an Osaka women's group demanded that Human Trash be recalled, they were told it was a takeoff on "men who discriminate against women." The game, no longer in production, is sold out across Japan.
  • Crying Jag

    She was fined for skipping Wimbledon and banned from the Olympics, but Monica Seles still demanded a new Jaguar after winning the Virginia Slims Championships last week, even though the tour's sponsor hadn't yet committed to providing the gift. She got it-proving, yet again, that she has more clout than charm.
  • Out Of Bounds:

    Seattle's KIRO-TV for killing a negative story about the University of Washington's winning football team. Station president Ken Hatch spiked a report about outstanding arrest warrants against seven of the Rose Bowl-bound Huskies for alleged offenses ranging from traffic violations to assault. Hatch told reporters the story would "spoil" the "Huskies fever" that gripped Seattle during the team's 11-0 season. KIRO broadcast a version of the report after reporter Mark Sauter, son of former CBS News president Van Gordon Sauter, quit in protest.
  • Life Under The Ozone Hole

    Walter Ulloa had no idea he lived in the Twilight Zone. He was too busy herding cattle on the southernmost spit of land in South America to have heard about the blind salmon caught in Tierra del Fuego. Or the pack of rabbits so myopic that hunters plucked them up by their ears. Or the thousands of sheep blinded by temporary cataracts. None of that much mattered--until unusual things started happening to Ulloa himself. After long days on an upper pasture, the 28-year-old ranch hand found that his arms burned "like boiling water," he said. His eyes, swollen and irritated, clouded over; his left one is now completely blind. Another ranch hand was also affected: focusing on objects now makes him weep uncontrollably. ...
  • She Loves You

    Cyndi Lauper's New York wedding last week was music to her ears--Little Richard officiated, Patti LaBelle serenaded and the bride, 38, didn't miss a beat. After the Quaker ceremony Lauper, actor and groom David Thornton and guests piled into a bus headed for an Italian restaurant downtown. Some girls know how to have fun.
  • How To Run Against Cuomo

    Nobody is neutral about Mario Cuomo. His admirers believe he is the only Democrat with the combat skills to beat George Bush. His detractors-and they include many Democrats-think he is the most overrated politician since John Connally spent $11 million to win one delegate at the 1980 GOP convention. One thing is certain: if Cuomo runs for president, it will be through a barrage of attacks. The GOP has crates of material analyzing Cuomo's public and private life. Roger Ailes, Bush's media adviser, envisions a series of 30-second TV spots featuring New York City streets and the soundtrack of Cuomo's "Family of America" speech from the 1984 Democratic convention. ...
  • The Boom In Gloom

    The rhetoric about the economy and the economy itself are drifting farther and farther apart. If you listen to the rhetoric, you'd think we were dropping rapidly into an economic canyon akin to the Great Depression of the 1930s. As history, this analogy (sometimes explicit, sometimes implied) is an atrocity: in the 1930s, unemployment averaged 18 percent. The sickliness of the economy today is a mild case of sniffles by comparison. ...
  • Safer Sex

    This is a story about the power of love, as it is understood by a certain 17-year-old San Francisco highschool student. Carmen had sex for the first time when she was 13, with a teenage boy from the neighborhood. She had symptoms of venereal disease-possibly chlamydia-at 14 and was finally treated for it a year after that, when she saw a gynecologist for the first time. Now, when she has sexual relations with her teenage boyfriend, she doesn't use a condom because she thinks she has something better. "Even if he was screwing around nothing would happen because he says he'll never do anything that would mess me up, and I believe him," she explains, changing buses on her way home from her Roman Catholic school. "We don't need no condom because he says he loves me."Love: next to the mosquito, probably the greatest disseminator of deadly microbes ever devised by the cruel hand of fate. Not only does it draw people into intimate contact, it addles their brains in the process. For the...
  • Shirley Temple Syndrome

    What ever happened to the innocence of childhood? Did it die with the conviction of Pete Rose in 1990? The death of "Sesame Street's" Mr. Hooper, in 1982? Or did it survive those traumas, only to succumb just last month to the twin blows of Magic Johnson's blood-test results and the sight of Macaulay Culkin, stung to death by bees, laid out in a little white coffin in his new movie, "My Girl"? For parents dreading the question "Gee, if it could happen to Macaulay Culkin, could it happen to me?"--a few words of advice: ...