Newswire

Newswire

  • Bonofide Pol?

    Most Americans think of Sonny Bono as Cher's disgruntled ex-husband. Even so, his 92 percent name recognition in California leads some Republican Party pros to see Bono, now mayor of Palm Springs, as a good bet to win the GOP Senate primary in the Golden State next year. Pollster Linda DiVall; Alex Castellanos, media adviser to Sen. Jesse Helms, and William Lace who ran George Bush's '88 California campaign, have signed on with Bono. A recent GOP poll shows radio and TV commentator Bruce Herschensohn with 19 percent support, Bono with 17 percent and Rep. Tom Campbell with 13 percent.
  • If Gatsby Had Been A Goodfella

    Bugsy, Barry Levinson's swank, moody evocation of the life of mobster Benjamin (Bugsy) Siegel, is a gangster movie with some heady ambitions up its nattily tailored sleeve. The movie's view of the mercurial Siegel--- played by Warren Beatty with a vigor he hasn't displayed in years-is charged with ambiguity. Part visionary (he virtually invented Las Vegas when he built the Flamingo Hotel), part psychotic, he's depicted as a lethal Gatsbyesque dreamer, equally charming and chilling. Levinson and screenwriter James Toback ("Fingers") hope to find in him a resonant American symbol of the thin line between crime and celebrity, blood and money. In addition, "Bugsy" is a love story. In Siegel's tempestuous affair with '40s starlet Virginia Hill (Annette Bening), his avaricious soul mate, the filmmakers want to further complicate our emotional responses by sweeping us up in the throes of obsessive passion. ...
  • Drowning In Fairy Dust

    All along it was considered the one sure-fire, can't-miss holiday blockbuster. If there was a movie Steven Spielberg was born to make, Hook was it: a contemporary update of the Peter Pan story with Robin Williams as a grown-up version of the boy who won't grow up, Dustin Hoffman as his one-handed nemesis from Neverland and Julia Roberts sprinkling fairy dust as Tinkerbell. Never mind its gargantuan budget (reportedly $70 million): this was the movie that was going to justify Sony's mammoth investment in Columbia/TriStar. Maybe so. And then again ... ...
  • The Race For Hdtv

    In the race to develop high-definition television (HDTV), there are two hares and a tortoise. The hares-Japan and Europe-have made HDTV an industrial priority and dashed out ahead. They are anxious to show off the extraordinary images made possible by HDTV and get a head start selling the wide-screen TVs that will bring the technology to consumers. The tortoise is the United States. Though late to the HDTV game, U.S. researchers have used digital technology to gain ground on their competitors. Within two years, the United States could have the world's most advanced HDTV transmission system. What's at stake? Technological prestige, for one thing. Big money, too. In a recent report, the Economist Intelligence Unit in London estimated that HDTV equipment (TVs, VCRs, camcorders and the like) could account for one third of all global electronic sales by the end of the century-or about $100 billion. ...
  • Self-Help For The Jobless

    "I'm Bob. My background is in marketing and general management and I like building businesses." ...
  • An 'F' For The Nation's Kindergartners

    More than a third of all children aren't ready to learn when they start school, according to a survey of 7,000 kindergarten teachers released this week. The biggest problem, the teachers said, was language skills. More than half of their students (51 percent) could not perform such tasks as stating their address, identifying colors or even reciting their first and last names, teachers said. When asked how the youngsters compared to those enrolled five years ago, 42 percent of the teachers said things were worse; only 25 percent thought their students were better prepared. ...
  • Sex Crimes: Women On Trial

    Like the Anita Hill/Clarence Thomas hearings in October, the rape trial of William Kennedy Smith has turned into a prime-time exploration of private parts, a public inquiry into the murkier corners of male-female relations where power, not romance, is the driving force. Much in the way the judiciary proceedings unleashed a furious debate over sexual harassment, the Palm Beach case has generated disturbing questions about the line between consensual sex and date rape. Years from now, the nation may look back upon these moments of extraordinary frankness as a turning point-but which way? Will the collective soul-searching produce fewer men who hear "yes" when she says "no"? Or could the rough handling of accusers on the stand cast a chill on other victims, sapping their resolve to come forward? ...
  • The Media: Old Circus, New Context

    The spectators were so rambunctious that they had to be restrained from carving their initials into the judge's chair. Photographers scrambled atop desks to snap hundreds of pictures of witnesses, and one newsreel cameraman secretly filmed part of the proceedings by using a hood to muffle the noise from his camera. With 141 reporters and 125 telegraph operators, the press horde exceeded the 150 accredited hacks in Palm Beach last week. ...
  • Nukes On The Loose

    Europe gained another independent nation last week when Ukrainian voters overwhelmingly chose to bail out of the Soviet Union. Ukraine is potentially a robust country, rich in both industry and agriculture and, with 52 million people, the sixth most populous nation in Europe. On paper, at least, it is also the world's third largest nuclear power, housing an arsenal far larger than those of China, Britain or France. Ukraine's president, a newly minted ex-communist named Leonid Kravchuk, insists that his country does not want "a finger on the nuclear button." But the weapons located in Ukraine have not yet been dismantled or returned to exclusive Soviet control. And as the old empire breaks up, other new countries may emerge with nuclear arms in their dowries. ...
  • The Finest Or The Fattest?

    Proudly displayed on every blue and white squad car of the Chicago police is the motto of the force: "We serve and protect." Maybe it should add "... and chow down." So suggests Alderman William Beavers, who, with the approval of the city council, is trying to make physical fitness an issue in ongoing contract talks with the police union. Cops already have to meet minimum standards in order to join the force. Why, Beavers asks, should those requirements be ignored once the officers go on duty? ...
  • Mama Sophia

    One of the dishes Barneys New York is serving for Christmas this year is macaroni and cheesecake. As part of the store's 16 holiday windows, Sophia Loren is placed in a kitchen (dressed in peasant outergarb and glamorous undergarb) with pasta everywhere, including coming out of the sink's faucet. She once said, after all, "Everything I have I owe to spaghetti."
  • Memo To Workers: No More Big Daddy

    In 1984 Robert Levering, with coauthors Milton Moskowitz and Michael Katz, wrote "The 100 Best Companies to Work for in America," a guide to the country's favorite employers. The intervening years have brought everything from the stockmarket crash to a major recession and a rash of mergers. Now, in a strikingly different corporate climate, Levering and Moskowitz have set out once again to rate employee-friendly companies. While the authors won't reveal their choices until their latest book debuts next year, Levering offered some insights into the altered employee landscape to NEWSWEEK'S Annetta Miller. ...
  • Dancing In The Dark

    Will you serve the nuts-I mean, would you serve the guests the nuts? ...
  • He Can't Make This Up

    Millions read Dave Barry's syndicated humor column. But how many have heard Dave Barry actually speak? If you called him before Thanksgiving, here's what his answering machine would have said: "Hello. You have reached the booking agent for Long Dong Silver. Due to his recent rise in popularity, Long Dong is booked up right now. But if you'll leave your name and number, we'll get back to you with information about some of our other acts, including Medium Dong Silver, Barely Adequate Dong Silver and Senator Orrin Hatch." ...
  • Be Kinder To Your 'Kinder'

    Germans, cynics say, like dogs better than children. Few would kick a cur, but a kid? That's another matter--so much so that Germany's Parliament has proposed tough new legislation barring parents from "nagging, spanking, boxing ears or withholding affection." Kids who feel abused can sue, fulfilling every adolescent's dream: "Gimme the car keys, Dad, or I'll tell the police you yelled at me." ...
  • The Blues At Big Blue

    The folks who worked for International Business Machines Corp. in Lexington, Ky., thought they were doing everything right. Many of the printers, typewriters and keyboards the plants produced were the class act of their field. The workers thought they were a shining example of the new IBM-lean and competitive. ...
  • Changing Flags?

    With the disintegration of the Soviet Union, the Soviet Embassy in Washington will likely close down. Soviet trade representatives last week told their U.S. counterparts that by next spring the building will be taken over by diplomats representing the Russian Republic, congressional sources say. The Soviet officials also said that when the takeover occurs, the embassy's new tenants will replace the hammer and sickle with the prerevolutionary flag of Russia. Not to be outdone, Ukraine also plans to open a U.S. embassy and trade office.
  • After Sununu, The Challenge On The Right

    No matter how angry George Bush became over John Sununu's taste for government airplanes and limousines, the president knew that he could always count on his chief of staff to make peace with the Republican right. Bush has long been paranoid about the party's right wing, and he had hired on Governor Sununu, a movement conservative out of New Hampshire, in part as protection. But this fall, as George Bush's aides took a closer look at the embattled chief of staff, they discovered a funny thing. It turned out that Sununu, in his self-aggrandizing way, was signaling the right that the president was indeed a dangerous closet moderate, and that only he could keep the president in line. "Sununu would purposely create a problem with conservatives and then rush in to solve it," said a White House aide. "Both the president and conservatives were left saying, 'Thank God we've got John Sununu! What would we do without him?' " For the president, the discovery of Sununu's double game was the...
  • All Together Now-Sort Of

    First it was Eurosclerosis: by 1980, the unemployment-racked countries of the Old World just couldn't get economic policy right. Then, Europhoria: the European Community's 1985 decision to eliminate internal trade barriers by 1992 set off a wave of investment that had the continent riding high. Now this week's EC summit in the Dutch city of Maastricht suggests that the 33-year-old Community has entered a more difficult stage. Call it Eurorealism. ...
  • Desperately Seeking Furry Friends

    Humans were not the only victims of the catastrophic fire that burned more than 3,000 homes in Oakland, Calif., last month. Thousands of pets were killed or driven away by the blaze, causing hundreds of area residents to resort to desperate measures to try to find their four-legged loved ones. Vicki Cochran has hired three psychics to locate her wayward Rottweiler, Erno. No luck so far, although the psychics have assured their client that Erno is still alive--somewhere. Cochran, like a number of other pet owners, has spent nearly $4,000 for helicopter searches, long-distance calls and fees for tarot-wielding psychics. Meantime, pet owners like Laurie Dornbrand have had better luck with a more traditional tack. She and her son Aaron found their beloved cat, Sidd, at an animal shelter. A week after the blaze, firemen had found the pet--badly singed about the paws, nose and ears--lying in a storm drain with another missing feline.