Newswire

Newswire

  • Practicing The Safest Sex Of All

    The poster shows a grim young man holding an infant. "A baby costs $474 a month," it says. "How much do you have in your pocket?" The poster hangs in a Baltimore middle school, and its message is effective. Thanks to a broad array of programs-from poster campaigns to hip drop-in health centers-Maryland's effort to get kids not to have kids is paying off. ...
  • Who Killed Laura Palmer-San?

    Japan may own a big chunk of it, but here's an example of just how far that country is from Hollywood: "Twin Peaks" mania is just now hitting full-throttle there. A Tokyo TV station aired all the episodes last month. Now stores can't keep "Peaks" videos in stock. And next month Japan's largest travel agency, JTB, will debut its "Tour to Twin Peaks," which is really Snoqualmie, Wash. Participants will stay in the Salish Lodge, known in the show as "The Great Northern Hotel." They will also visit White Tail Falls, the RR Diner and the spot where Laura Palmer was found dead.
  • Self-Indulgent Help

    Brennan, a freelance writer, lives in Cambridge, Mass. ...
  • A New Boost For Quayle

    For Dan Quayle, it was the silence that was so reassuring. After President Bush collapsed in Tokyo last week, the airwaves didn't fill up with "heartbeat away" stories. Johnny Carson decided that Bush's stomach flu was better material than a new round of Quayle jokes. About to embark on a campaign swing in New Hampshire when the president fell sick, the vice president went ahead and did what he does best: meeting and greeting his way gaffelessly through small-town photo ops. Back in the capital, The Washington Post (whose parent company owns NEWSWEEK) published a much-anticipated series that was newsworthy primarily for its absence of bombshells-and for the fact that Quayle came across as a shrewd, ambitious pol more to be reckoned with than laughed at. It was, in the Beltway consensus, Quayle's most politically successful week on the job. "It signifies a watershed," said GOP publicist Sheila Tate. ...
  • Now, It's Reach Out And See Someone

    Picking up the telephone is the quickest way to let people know you're thinking about them. But from now on, when you call home on Mother's Day, you may have to comb your hair first. ...
  • Entering The Virtual Zone

    You put on the video helmet and quickly realize this is not just another video game. Your entire field of vision fills with an otherworldly scene; you are in the game. Sensors in the encircling machine track your movements. You "walk" around the checkerboard platforms that make up the gameboard. You keep your eyes open for your enemy, the guy in the blue trousers. When you shoot, your nemesis is blown to colorful smithereens-a sight that is, to use a technical term, way cool. Duck! Above, you hear the giant green pterodactyl swooping in for lunch-that is, you. It sweeps you up; the platforms swirl away below. Hope you're not acrophobic. ...
  • In Algeria, 'The Victory Of God'

    God is great!" cry thousands of kneeling worshipers along the streets outside Algiers's El-Sunna mosque. "The party of God heralds the victory of God," booms back the voice of Abdelkader Hachani, interim leader of the Islamic Salvation Front (FIS). "We will not swerve from our goal, to build an Islamic state." "Islam is light," chimes in Imam Abdelkader Moghni. "Darkness is in democracy." Across Algeria last week, fundamentalists celebrated their landslide victory in Algeria's first free nationwide elections-and prepared to usher in an Islamic republic. ...
  • A League Of Their Own

    There was a great ball game in South Dakota the other night. A gallery of former college and NBA players were there, whirling and high-fiving through the frantic final minutes of the Yakima Sun Kings' loss to the Sioux Falls Skyforce. But as highlights go, there were other candidates. Such as those pizzas falling from the roof, courtesy of the local Pizza Hut. And something called "Bowling for Beef," in which "the luckiest stud in Sioux Falls" won himself a freebie at the Sirloin Stockade. And the free haircut booth and the slam-dunking gymnastics team and those disco dancers gyrating oh-so-expressively to heavy metal. Whatever turned them on, 5,000 screaming Skyforce loyalists were shaking the rafters. And even though most of the players will forever have to pay their way into NBA arenas, it hardly seemed to matter. "This is prime time," says fan Mike Went. "I live for these men." ...
  • School Daze

    If Democratic presidential candidate Bob Kerrey had his way, he'd probably rewrite the federal child-labor laws. Kerrey's restaurant chain, Grandmother's Inc., was cited last month for 116 violations, many involving kids working on Friday nights. The law bars people under 16 from working after 7 p.m. on school days-- including Friday, the kickoff to the weekend-but kids may work until 9 p.m. on Sunday. Reagan Labor Department efforts to extend the Friday hours were blocked by congressional Democrats, fearing union members would lose jobs.
  • Where To Invest In '92

    Are you saying to yourself: "The economy is rotten, so why is the stock market so high?" You've got it backward. Stocks move in advance of economic activity. So the real message is that, with stocks moving up, the economy should soon improve. Assuming (as I do) that this isn't the 1930s, stocks are going to stay strong in 1992. ...
  • A New Year's Resolution

    Outgoing U.N. Secretary-General Javier Perez de Cuellar has been credited with wrapping up the Salvadoran cease-fire last week just minutes before the New Year. But NEWSWEEK has learned that it was a high-level delegation of American diplomats who finally pressured the Salvadoran government into accepting the agreement that ends the 12-year civil war. Two days before the accord was signed, says a source close to the talks, Assistant Secretary of State Bernard Aronson, U.S. Ambassador to El Salvador William Walker and U.N. Ambassador Thomas Pickering met with Salvadoran President Alfredo Cristiani and Defense Minister Gen. Rene Emilio Ponce. The U.S. officials reportedly warned of major cuts in U.S. military and economic aid unless a cease-fire was signed before Perez de Cuellar's term ended Dec. 31. "[Washington] wants to disengage completely from Central America," says the source. "New Year's Eve was their window of opportunity."
  • Down And Out And So In Love

    Two young narcs, the pale, intense Raynor (Jason Patric) and his inexperienced recruit Kristen (Jennifer Jason Leigh), pose as junkies to infiltrate the drug underground in a 1974 Texas town. Their act is too successful: soon they bring their work home at night and get hooked. They also fall in love. In Rush, adapted by Peter Dexter from Kim Wozencraft's autobiographical novel, these lover/junkie/narcs discover there is little honor on either side of the law; they can trust only each other. ...
  • Politics: The Inside Track

    Sen. Bob Kerrey's campaign was not going well. The candidate was supposed to be the Democrat with star quality among the unknowns who make up the 1992 presidential field. But his message was fuzzy, his staff in turmoil, his poll numbers going nowhere. It was Panic City. Time for his Washington consultants to get on a plane, fly to New Hampshire and meet the candidate. That's not "meet" as in "join up with." That's "meet" as in "nice to meet you." ...
  • A Questionable Saint

    To his followers, his life was shaped by God, his every pronouncement a source of divinely revealed instruction. To his critics, he was a proud, ill-tempered spiritual elitist who privately sneered at popes and encouraged a posthumous cult to himself. Whatever he was, Msgr. Josemaria Escriva de Balaguer, the Spanish founder of Opus Dei ("The Work of God"), a powerful and secretive international association of 75,000 Roman Catholics, is on his way to being declared a saint. Already, say Opus Dei officials, all hotel rooms in Rome are booked for next May 17, when Pope John Paul II is scheduled to beatify Escriva, in St. Peter's Square. ...
  • A Split Verdict On America's Marital Future

    Almost everyone has heard the good news: the divorce rate has dropped. Though the decline is modest (5.3 out of a thousand people got divorced in 1981; 4.7 in 1990), it seems to represent a glimmer of hope that the married, two-parent family may yet avoid extinction. But is that hope justified? Demographers are divided about what the figures really tell us. ...
  • A Blizzard Of 'Looky-Loos' Buries Aspen

    If it's New Year's, this must be Aspen. Stars, studio heads, princes and billionaires jetting in to schuss and schmooze. Parties, parties and more parties--each vying to be the party. ...
  • Queen High

    Royalty never rests. The monarch of rap, Queen Latifah, who is currently on a cross-country tour, recently completed her third movie, due out this month. Such is her status that in "Juice," which Latifah describes as a "sort of East Coast version of 'Boyz N the Hood'," she actually plays herself as the mistress of ceremonies at a deejay competition. Now she's about to film a TV pilot, a comedy "about '90s girls trying to make it in the world." Make it or not, the show has a decidedly '90s title: "Out of My Face."
  • What Bush Should Say

    Washington bureau chief Evan Thomas proposes a no-nonsense approach to the State of the Union. Privately, Bush's top advisers admit that the plan proposed here--cutting federal entitlement programs across the board-is the wise thing to do. But politically, it's deemed too risky. ...
  • It's Time To Pay The Piper

    Here's a musical quiz for the new year. What did Nero most likely play while Rome burned? (A) fiddle (B) bagpipe (C) lute (D) horn. If you chose (B), you either made a brilliant guess, cheated by looking at the picture on the right or are already a member of the swelling ranks of bagpipe lovers. ...