Newswire

Newswire

  • Mama Sophia

    One of the dishes Barneys New York is serving for Christmas this year is macaroni and cheesecake. As part of the store's 16 holiday windows, Sophia Loren is placed in a kitchen (dressed in peasant outergarb and glamorous undergarb) with pasta everywhere, including coming out of the sink's faucet. She once said, after all, "Everything I have I owe to spaghetti."
  • Memo To Workers: No More Big Daddy

    In 1984 Robert Levering, with coauthors Milton Moskowitz and Michael Katz, wrote "The 100 Best Companies to Work for in America," a guide to the country's favorite employers. The intervening years have brought everything from the stockmarket crash to a major recession and a rash of mergers. Now, in a strikingly different corporate climate, Levering and Moskowitz have set out once again to rate employee-friendly companies. While the authors won't reveal their choices until their latest book debuts next year, Levering offered some insights into the altered employee landscape to NEWSWEEK'S Annetta Miller. ...
  • Dancing In The Dark

    Will you serve the nuts-I mean, would you serve the guests the nuts? ...
  • He Can't Make This Up

    Millions read Dave Barry's syndicated humor column. But how many have heard Dave Barry actually speak? If you called him before Thanksgiving, here's what his answering machine would have said: "Hello. You have reached the booking agent for Long Dong Silver. Due to his recent rise in popularity, Long Dong is booked up right now. But if you'll leave your name and number, we'll get back to you with information about some of our other acts, including Medium Dong Silver, Barely Adequate Dong Silver and Senator Orrin Hatch." ...
  • Be Kinder To Your 'Kinder'

    Germans, cynics say, like dogs better than children. Few would kick a cur, but a kid? That's another matter--so much so that Germany's Parliament has proposed tough new legislation barring parents from "nagging, spanking, boxing ears or withholding affection." Kids who feel abused can sue, fulfilling every adolescent's dream: "Gimme the car keys, Dad, or I'll tell the police you yelled at me." ...
  • The Blues At Big Blue

    The folks who worked for International Business Machines Corp. in Lexington, Ky., thought they were doing everything right. Many of the printers, typewriters and keyboards the plants produced were the class act of their field. The workers thought they were a shining example of the new IBM-lean and competitive. ...
  • Changing Flags?

    With the disintegration of the Soviet Union, the Soviet Embassy in Washington will likely close down. Soviet trade representatives last week told their U.S. counterparts that by next spring the building will be taken over by diplomats representing the Russian Republic, congressional sources say. The Soviet officials also said that when the takeover occurs, the embassy's new tenants will replace the hammer and sickle with the prerevolutionary flag of Russia. Not to be outdone, Ukraine also plans to open a U.S. embassy and trade office.
  • After Sununu, The Challenge On The Right

    No matter how angry George Bush became over John Sununu's taste for government airplanes and limousines, the president knew that he could always count on his chief of staff to make peace with the Republican right. Bush has long been paranoid about the party's right wing, and he had hired on Governor Sununu, a movement conservative out of New Hampshire, in part as protection. But this fall, as George Bush's aides took a closer look at the embattled chief of staff, they discovered a funny thing. It turned out that Sununu, in his self-aggrandizing way, was signaling the right that the president was indeed a dangerous closet moderate, and that only he could keep the president in line. "Sununu would purposely create a problem with conservatives and then rush in to solve it," said a White House aide. "Both the president and conservatives were left saying, 'Thank God we've got John Sununu! What would we do without him?' " For the president, the discovery of Sununu's double game was the...
  • All Together Now-Sort Of

    First it was Eurosclerosis: by 1980, the unemployment-racked countries of the Old World just couldn't get economic policy right. Then, Europhoria: the European Community's 1985 decision to eliminate internal trade barriers by 1992 set off a wave of investment that had the continent riding high. Now this week's EC summit in the Dutch city of Maastricht suggests that the 33-year-old Community has entered a more difficult stage. Call it Eurorealism. ...
  • Desperately Seeking Furry Friends

    Humans were not the only victims of the catastrophic fire that burned more than 3,000 homes in Oakland, Calif., last month. Thousands of pets were killed or driven away by the blaze, causing hundreds of area residents to resort to desperate measures to try to find their four-legged loved ones. Vicki Cochran has hired three psychics to locate her wayward Rottweiler, Erno. No luck so far, although the psychics have assured their client that Erno is still alive--somewhere. Cochran, like a number of other pet owners, has spent nearly $4,000 for helicopter searches, long-distance calls and fees for tarot-wielding psychics. Meantime, pet owners like Laurie Dornbrand have had better luck with a more traditional tack. She and her son Aaron found their beloved cat, Sidd, at an animal shelter. A week after the blaze, firemen had found the pet--badly singed about the paws, nose and ears--lying in a storm drain with another missing feline.
  • Cash Flow

    Congressional Quarterly, a publication covering affairs on Capitol Hill, has put together a report on congressional spending in 1991. Here are some examples of where the money went. $8.4 million to maintain the 132-room White House. The 97-person staff includes five florists, five calligraphers and five curators.$1.7 million for a research center in Texas to study how to make "killer bees" less aggressive.$466 million to operate the Senate, which employs about 7,400 people; it costs $709 million to operate the House, which employs 12,500.$2.2 billion for Head Start; it will serve 39,000 more preschoolers than it did last year.$50 million to house people with AIDS.
  • No Happy Warriors Here

    New York's governor-devoutly Catholic, proudly ethnic, unapologetically Democratic in a Republican era and contemplating a run for the White House-sauntered into his office and encountered some Kansas politicians who had come East to get a gander at him. "Hello, boys," said His Excellency expansively, "glad to see you. You know, the other day some boys were in from Wisconsin and I learned something. I always thought that Wisconsin was on this side of the lake. It's on the other side. Glad to know it. Glad to know more about the place the good beer comes from." ...
  • Even When It's Over It Isn't Over

    Lawrence Jenco had just walked into his newly painted closet, intending to screw in some hooks, when the door swung shut--and suddenly he was in another closet, thousands of miles away, chained to the wall with a plastic bag draped over his head. When the Roman Catholic priest came back to reality in Joliet, Ill., he was sitting on the floor, crying. ...
  • Pearl Harbor Brought Peace

    We should indeed "remember Pearl Harbor" 50 years later, but not for the reasons that made these words a wartime slogan. Then, the slogan was a means of stirring support for the resolute prosecution of the war; its force came from national outrage at the surprise attack delivered on what FDR called the "date which will live in infamy." But we do not need that anger now. Looking back across decades in which Japan and the United States have shared one of the most rewarding political and economic connections in history, what we most need to remember about Pearl Harbor today is that this later history could never have worked out so well without that terrible event. Pearl Harbor, and nothing else, made it certain that the Americans would fight the Pacific war to a clear and complete victory, and that victory was an indispensable requirement for the emergence of the prosperous and peaceable partner we now have in Japan. ...
  • An American Revolution

    It cannot be denied that the French excel all nations in the excellence of their cuisine," wrote the influential cooking teacher Fannie Farmer back in 1896. Why she then proceeded to add ketchup to her vinaigrette and sugar to her champagne sauce is a mystery she took to the grave. But it underscores the peculiarities inherent in our historic reverence for French food. Americans both fear and worship it: All that cream and butter! All that work! All that money! As for the French, their attitude toward most American food has long been a simple mixture of horror and contempt. Increasingly, however, it's become clear that the traditional imbalance between France and America on matters culinary is starting to change. ...
  • Wanted:Some Straight Talk

    It's time for an end to cat-and-mouse campaigns. A little truth-telling is needed. ...
  • Condoms In The Classroom

    There it was. A sheet of plain green composition paper Scotch-taped to the wall just inside the gym door. CONDOMS ARE NOW AVAILABLE. SEE MARGO 301A. The simple message, posted last week at a high school in New York City's Greenwich Village, was probably the first of its kind to appear in any U.S. public school-but unquestionably not the last. Fueled by the rising rate of HIV infection among teens, school boards in Philadelphia, Portland, Ore., San Francisco and other U.S. cities are pushing forward with plans to make condoms freely available to teenage students. They'll be offered with counseling and instruction by trained volunteers. In New York, as elsewhere, the issue was fiercely debated, splitting the school board and pitting city officials against a powerful Roman Catholic cardinal. But Schools Chancellor Joseph Fernandez had little patience with the argument that giving kids condoms might seem to sanction their sex ual activity-or even encourage promiscuity. "This is not an...
  • The Bank Robbery Boom

    Can there now be any doubt that the '90s will be a decade of retrenchment--an era of smaller sirloins, fewer M.B.A.s and countless "Mr. Ed" remakes? Even in the world of criminal enterprise, it seems there is a return to basics. In the '80s, if you wanted to fleece a bank, you bought one (preferably a savings and loan) and artfully drove it into the ground, making sure of course to skim off a healthy take and to save a few dollars for your favorite senator. In the new decade, the approach is far simpler: you go into the bank and stick it up. ...
  • Between An Atom And A Hard Place

    No one promised that divining the ultimate nature of the universe would come cheaply. But they sure swore that it would not come at the price of gouging other research. For years, that has been the vow of politicians and physicists lobbying for the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC). This 54-mile-long particle accelerator, to be built in Texas, will replicate the conditions soon after the birth of the universe and reveal the deepest laws of nature. Cost estimates have risen from $5 billion to $11.3 billion, however, and despite impressive pork-barreling-subcontractors are scattered through some 40 states-the SSC maybe on the ropes. A task force within the Department of Energy, chaired by Nobel physicist Charles Townes, recently implied that the only way to keep the SSC on track in a zero-growth budget is to cannibalize other physics research. If forced to decide between funding the SSC and cutting other research, the SSC "is going down the tubes," says House science committee...