Newswire

Newswire

  • Buchanan: Thunder On The Right

    At Gonzaga High School in the 1950s, Patrick Buchanan had a reputation for never passing up a fight. If he saw two guys going at it, a classmate recalls, he would ask: "Is this a private fight or can anybody get in it?" His love of a brawl partly explains why he is preparing to take on a popular president of his own party. ...
  • Taking Off--To Taiwan

    For McDonnell Douglas, it was a deal made in heaven--but for trade hawks. It came from a lower, hotter place. Last week the plane maker said that it was close to a deal to sell 40 percent of its commercial-jet-manufacturing business to Taiwan Aerospace for some $2 billion. ...
  • Coming To Terms With Japan

    Fifty years later, many Americans wonder who won the war after all. They see Japan's business-suited legions conquering worldwide markets, wiping out entire U.S. industries and planting their flag on blue-chip properties all over America. The Japanese thrive by dint of virtues once considered distinctively American: hard work, thrift, ingenuity. But they sometimes appear to grasp success by underhanded means. Despite years of grudging promises to open their own markets, they still buy relatively few American goods, even those that are better or cheaper than Japanese products. Their postwar conversion to "one-country pacifism" sometimes seems a little too convenient. Americans complain about protecting Japan overseas while the Japanese steal their jobs. ...
  • The Horror, The Horror

    Martin Scorsese's first suspense thriller, a remake of Cape Fear, whips M up adrenaline and anxiety with pharmaceutical finesse. Did anyone doubt that it would? Though he may be a newcomer to the genre, the director of "Taxi Driver," "Raging Bull" and "GoodFellas" is no stranger to fear, loathing and psychological dread. The terror that was the undercurrent in his earlier films is now the main attraction, and no small part of the gaudy, nasty fun of "Cape Fear" is watching Scorsese apply his virtuosity to a form that some may consider beneath him. This is a flagrantly self-conscious suspense movie in which you find yourself admiring each edgy, expressionistic angle, every vertiginous camera move, each blatant cinematic homage while simultaneously gripping your seat in horror. ...
  • When A Handbag Isn't Enough

    Backpacks have come a long way from book-toting student garb. Whether strapped on pack-animal style or slung casually over one shoulder, they're the latest up-from-the-street high-fashion trend. A Peri sampler: Big enough to hold a pup tent and bedroll. But lose the gold coins. $675.The L.L. Bean look--at 18 times the price. Stick with the catalog. $470.Downmarket but chicly utilitarian. A good buy in leather at $135.Hand-painted design on felt. Colorful, but what if it rains? $295.Pretty but pricey. Can be color-coordinated with suede moccasins. $695.Looks hot--and bulky. Better as overnight bag? $235.
  • Get Me Repaint!

    It's not the first time Goya's "Naked Maja" has stirred controversy. The portrait scandalized Spanish society nearly 200 years ago; Goya even painted a matching " clothed" version. Last week Pennsylvania State University officials removed a copy of the "Maja" from a classroom wall after a woman professor called if a form of sexual harassment. "Female faculty find it difficult to appear professional when forced to lecture with a picture of a female nude on the wall behind them," said a campus liaison committee on women. "Ludicrous censorship," said student government president James Ford.
  • Nbc News Goes Docu-Shopping

    For months, NBC News has been blasted within the industry for compromising its role as a serious news organization. The critics' latest evidence: the failure of NBC News to commemorate the 50th anniversary of Pearl Harbor with a prime-time documentary. (ABC, CBS and CNN are all doing so.) After the airing of a highly rated Pearl Harbor documentary on PBS's "The American Experience," NBC offered to buy the program from PBS and repackage it, But for contractual reasons, PBS couldn't sell. That left the network covering the anniversary only on "Today" and "Nightly News." "We all make different choices," said NBC spokesperson Peggy Hubble.
  • Show Time For 'The Six-Pack'

    For Democrats, suddenly, it's show time. George Bush, buffeted by bad economic news and unrest on the right, looks vulnerable. At the AFL-CIO's Detroit convention last week, the party's six declared presidential candidates appeared together for the first time--and the press actually showed up. "The six-pack" found a new way to get ink: by contrasting themselves with New York Gov. Mario Cuomo. Iowa Sen. Tom Harkin accused Mr. Undeclared of the sin of self-absorption. Aides to Arkansas Gov. Bill Clinton called Cuomo "the ultimate Big Government liberal" and the perfect foil for Clinton's "New Paradigm" candidacy. ...
  • States Of Mind

    Three quarters of Americans 25 and older have a high-school diploma; one fifth hold a college degree. The most and least educated states: Alabama 63.2% Kentucky 64.7% Tennessee 65.4% Arkansas 67.6% Mississippi 67.7% Massachusetts 28.1% Connecticut 27.5% Maryland 27.4% Virginia 27.3% Colorado 27.0%
  • Thinking Looks Like This

    There are no problems in neuroscience that transparent skulls and gray matter wouldn't cure, but in the meantime researchers have an amazingly good surrogate for peering into the mind. It's called PET (positron emission tomography) scanning, and it's a Geiger counter for the brain: it shows in living color which regions are active during remembering, thinking and other mental chores. Last week in New Orleans, at the annual meeting of the Society for Neuroscience, researchers put on a PET show that revealed the brain at work--and upended conventional notions of thinking and remembering. "Given the subtlety of cognition, it's a surprise you can see anything at all," says Larry Squire of the Veterans Affairs Medical Center in San Diego and the University of California, San Diego. "It augurs well for using PET to get at the secrets of the brain." ...
  • A Boon Or Bust For Women?

    Should a medical device be surgically implanted in 150,000 women each year if the manufacturers can't prove it's safe? An advisory committee to the U.S. Food and Drug Administration wrestled with that question last week, and it answered with a qualified yes. After hearing three days of impassioned testimony from users and makers of silicone breast implants, the panel voted overwhelmingly to reject the manufacturers' safety data. Yet while citing unanswered questions about how long the devices last and what risks they pose, the panel voted against taking them off the market. For American women, the panelists agreed, silicone implants have become a public-health necessity." ...
  • The Road To Stable Prices

    You remember the 1950s: cars had fins, television was black and white, Ike occupied the White House--and almost no one worried about inflation. The fins, black-and-white TV and Ike are gone forever, but we can retrieve the '50s' splendid inflation record. We may be slowly doing just that. It took us 20 years to travel from almost no inflation (1.4 percent in 1960) to double digits (13.3 percent in 1979). We may now be halfway through a bumpy return trip that restores price stability by the turn of the century. It's a desirable, if difficult, destination. ...
  • Starry Eyed

    A new book about the Chicago Bulls claims that Michael Jordan's teammates think he's self-centered. True or not, that thesis may get a lift when Sir Air opens his Michael Jordan's Restaurant next spring in Chicago. The eatery's design includes a zoolike, glass-enclosed living-room area called "Michael Jordan's Private Room." Wide-eyed customers will press their noses against the glass as M.J. and his pals kick back. And, if the stars-on-display tire of the gawkers, they'll pull down window coverings.
  • Battling The Bias

    A senseless murder made the point. A gang of Houston teenagers allegedly clubbed Paul Broussard, 27, to death last summer in a parking lot. The young banker's offense? He was gay. In response to public outrage, police launched Operation Vice Versa, an undercover sting in which cops posed as gay men to entrap bashers. On national television, the officers talked about how shocked they were at the level of violence against homosexuals--and gay-rights advocates heralded a new age of police sensitivity in Houston. But when police suspended the high-profile sting two weeks later, promising to reinstate it from time to time, gays felt unsafe again. As if to confirm their fears, this month a self-professed homophobe shot another gay man in the head in the same neighborhood. Waving HATE KILLS Signs, gay protesters stormed city hall. ...
  • The Height Report Men And Heart Attacks

    It just doesn't seem fair. Being short, for a man, has enough disadvantages already--other males shoot the breeze over your head, and women refer to you as "cute," at best. Now it turns out there's a new drawback to being small--it bodes ill for cardiovascular health. Men who are 5 foot 7 and under, Boston researchers reported last week, have a 60 percent higher risk for a heart attack than men who are 6 foot 1 or taller. And for every inch of height over 5 foot 7, the risk drops three percentage points. ...
  • Remembering Pearl Harbor

    The night was black, low clouds hung over the Pacific. Several hundred miles to the north of the Hawaiian Islands, the emperor's battle fleet pitched and rolled in heavy seas. In the middle of the night, Lt. Hirata Matsumura got out of his bunk aboard the aircraft carrier Hiryu, slipped into new underwear and pulled on a flying suit. Then he trimmed his nails and cut a lock of hair to leave his family. Up on the flight deck, a Nakajima-97 bomber was waiting for him, an 800-kilo torpedo strapped to its belly. The Zeroes took off first that day, then the bombers, then the torpedo planes. For two hours they flew southward above the clouds. Then patches of blue sky opened over Diamond Head. Lieutenant Matsumura nosed his plane over--and roared toward Pearl Harbor. ...
  • Revival Sessions

    Can analysis be worthwhile?" asked the old Paul Simon lyric. The question was familiar and the answer, a few years ago, seemed no longer in doubt. Undermined by the advent of quick-fix therapies, mind-mending drugs and its own prohibitive costs, psychoanalysis of the classical, practically interminable, barely reimbursable kind appeared well on its way to the elephants' graveyard. There were still, as always, dedicated, full-time analysands to be found in moneyed enclaves from Murray Hill to Nob Hill. But analysts were having to take on rough trade to survive--once-a-week, once-over-lightly therapy clients without the time, the means or even the inclination to support deeper explorations of the psyche. ...
  • Saying 'No' To Duke

    The new disclosures kept coming in a steady drip over the final days. The "born again" experience that David Duke said delivered him from a life of hatred was denounced as a sham by a top adviser, who quit in disgust. The church he claimed to attend doesn't even exist. There was a fresh account of anti-Semitic comments he made as recently as last year. But even this last litany of reported slurs and deceptions was not enough to repel Duke's charge toward the Louisiana governor's mansion. It took a desperate crusade by black voters, a multi-million-dollar barrage of last-minute anti-Duke television spots and dramatic appeals from Louisiana icons such as singer Aaron Neville and New Orleans Saints quarterback Bobby Hebert to put Democrat Edwin Edwards over the top in last Saturday's bitterly divisive runoff. The former three-term governor rolled over Duke by a landslide margin of 61-39. "Tonight, reason and compassion reign in Louisiana," Edwards exulted in his victory speech. "We...
  • Like Mother, Like Model

    A thing of beauty is a joy forever--but who couldn't use a little help on those bleary mornings? Last week super-model Paulina Porizkova came to the rescue, debuting a makeup video at Macy's. But Paulina's million-dollar mug is hardly a neutral palette for the powders Estee Lauder plugs. So the tape includes her stunning mom--that's as close as you get to average in makeup land.
  • Sweeping History Under The Carpet

    Saburo Ienaga is 78 years old now, and he could do without the ordeal--"the shameful, stressful battle," as he calls it. But he is now the plaintiff in a widely followed case before Japan's Supreme Court, Ienaga v. the Education Minister. Ienaga, a historian, has accused the ministry of censorship--a violation, he says, of Japan's Constitution. "The content of our history education is very important," he says. "The children of our postwar generation don't know anything about the war." ...