Newswire

Newswire

  • Terror In The New Germany

    Detlev Karsten Rohwedder, the man known as "the manager of German unity," was up late one night last week working in the study of his Dusseldorf home. Suddenly a bullet smashed through the study window and hit him in the spine. Rohwedder died instantly. In a garden across the street, police found a letter bearing the seal of the terrorist Red Army Faction. The message denounced the "imperialist beast" and "reactionary great German plans" to "exploit" the world. ...
  • Race

    The Cignal clothing chain, for recording the race of customers on the backs of personal checks. A Hispanic customer named Jacqueline Perczek discovered the offensive practice recently when a cashed check from a Boston store had an "H" for Hispanic on it. A company spokesman described the practice as "a quality-control mechanism." But after Perczek's complaint Cignal revoked the policy last week, saying it was open to "misinterpretation."
  • Seattle Is Talking.

    who is knocking off felines at an alarming rate. Cats are being kept indoors and away from windows to guard against the sniper, who first hit in early March. Police say the sniper's record includes four cats fatally shot while sleeping in windows, one cat wounded and one stuffed toy cat mistaken for the real thing and blown across a room. Police have little evidence and fear a human could be accidentally shot.
  • Leerbook

    She's hot now, but 1992 will be the year of Claudia Schiffer. The Guess? supermodel will turn up on her own calendar, with each month offering portraits in skimpy swimsuits, wet T shirts, lingerie and, on the cover, not much of anything. Already hundreds of thousands have been ordered (it will be available starting in July), and Patricia Sklar, president c Landmark Calendars, predicts, "It'll stand out on the shelves. It'll say 'buy me'." Others might get a different message.
  • A Bigger Hole In The Ozone

    The nations of the world have never agreed on how to halt the destruction of rain forests or save endangered species. But when it came to saving the ozone layer, which screens out the sun's harmful ultraviolet rays, they knew just what to do. Or so it seemed. In 1987, 24 nations meeting in Montreal pledged that, by the year 2000, they would halve their production of chlorofluorocarbons (CFCs), chemicals that destroy ozone. That was when the only ozone hole that had been noticed was over Antarctica. But soon after, satellite data showed that ozone above the United States had dropped 1.5 percent. That persuaded more than 90 countries last June to agree to ban CFCs entirely by 2000. Developing nations were given until 2010 to stop producing ozone-damaging chemicals; wealthier countries promised them up to $240 million to help make the switch. ...
  • 'The Hairdo With Anxiety'

    If privacy ends where hypocrisy begins, Kitty Kelley's steamy expose of Nancy Reagan is a contribution to contemporary history. The revelations about the First Lady's "promiscuous" lifestyle as a Hollywood starlet, her "intimate relationship" with Frank Sinatra and her eagerness for daughter Patti to undergo an abortion expose the cracks in the Reagans' family-values veneer. "They told us how to live our lives, and in that light, this is interesting," says Kelley. Interesting doesn't touch it. In the first 100 pages of "Nancy Reagan: The Unauthorized Biography," we are told that Ronald Reagan had an affair that resulted in an abortion, and that he forced himself sexually on l9-year-old starlet Selene Walters. "It was the most pitched battle I've ever had," Walters recalls. "They call it 'date rape' today." ...
  • Stalinism's Last Stand

    The scene: women in sweeping peasant skirts and shawls, hoeing a field. The colorful clothes play off the landscape, creating an arresting tableau. An impressionist painting? No - Albania today. Abruptly, the image changes. A car stops and a man leaps out. "Idiots! Stupid!" he yells at the workers. "They have manipulated you!" The man, an opposition deputy in Albania's newly elected Parliament, turns his wrath on the women's communist keeper, slumbering under a tree. "Parasite!" he snarls at the boss man, called "the Brigadier." "When we take over, you, too, will have to work, not just watch." ...
  • Third Gear, It's All Right

    Well, I guess I ran right off the road and I wasn't even wearing my seat belt," wrote Lee Iacocca about his marriage to Peggy Johnson. Iacocca's second go-round was not a smooth ride: it lasted only a year and a half. But the groom decided to buckle up and get back on that freeway of love. A week ago Saturday, the Chrysler chairman and L.A. restaurateur Darrien Earle wed in a quiet ceremony in Beverly Hills. Earle, 42, wore a white silk chiffon and gold-beaded dress that reportedly cost $23,000. Va-va-va-vroom.
  • Buy Me Into The Ball Game

    For $95 million, here's what you get: the newest - and undoubtedly worst - team in baseball, the chance to be called an idiot by every sportscaster in town, and that dreaded phone call from Aunt Roseanne asking to sing the national anthem. Plus the privilege of leasing a stadium, building a farm system and paying a squad of other teams' castoffs - all at an additional cost of about $40 million. ...
  • A Doctor's Case

    Kurland is a pediatric pulmonologist at Children's Hospital of Pittsburgh, University of Pittsburgh. ...
  • Follow That Horse!

    A controversy has kicked up in Washington over reports that the National Park Service plans to spend $80,000 on stables for training equestrian Secret Service agents to accompany Vice President Dan Quayle and his family, avid horseback riders, and other top officials. Nebraska Rep. Peter Hoagland last week wrote Interior Secretary Manuel Lujan questioning the expenditure in view of recent budget cuts. Interior officials say the added stables at Manassas Battlefield Park in Virginia are for retired U.S. Park Police horses. But Hoagland cites a 1990 letter from the Secret Service stating that the extra stalls are "essential" to train personnel for the Vice Presidential Protective Division.
  • As Earnest As They Wanna Be

    Early in "Tourfilm," the gratuitously arty concert video by the rock band R.E.M., singer Michael Stipe pauses between songs to hector a member of the audience. "That," he warns, "better not be Styrofoam, pal." ...
  • The Exorcism Of Gina

    For most Roman Catholics, the rite of exorcism belongs to the shadows of their church's distant past. As medicine and psychiatry began to explain the demons that produce mental illness, the ritual - although still officially sanctioned - became a rarity, confined largely to supermarket tabloids and Hollywood scripts. But Cardinal John O'Connor, the archbishop of New York, has been pulling this exotic rite back from the fringes of the faith. During a sermon last year in which he warned that the Devil was still at work in the world, he disclosed that he had recently authorized two exorcisms in his archdiocese. Last week, with the consent of a diocesan consultant to O'Connor, ABC's "20/20" aired the exorcism of an emotionally disturbed Florida teenager. ...
  • The Hoffa File

    Jimmy Hoffa conspiracy buffs may soon get some new information about the tumultuous life and death of the former Teamsters boss. Hoffa's daughter Barbara Ann Crancer, a Missouri lawyer, has cleared one important legal hurdle in her effort to get the FBI to release its 13,800-page file on Hoffa's 1975 disappearance. The Justice Department has been ordered to turn over a comprehensive index of the file so that a federal magistrate can determine whether it should remain secret. The FBI says it will resist, claiming the file is full of sensitive material that could jeopardize the Hoffa and other investigations.The FBI reportedly has prime suspects in Hoffa's disappearance but does not have enough evidence to bring charges. Even if Hoffa's daughter wins the struggle against the FBI, many of the choicest tidbits are likely to be blacked out.
  • Neil Bush: Dallas Bound?

    After 11 years in Denver, President Bush's embattled son Neil is moving on. The house that he and his wife, Sharon, bought for $550,000 two years ago is for sale. And word around town is they may head for Dallas, where Neil's brother, George, is co-owner of the Texas Rangers baseball team. Neil Bush's oil-and-gas explorations in the West never prospered, and he's being sued by the Federal Deposit Insurance Corporation for his role in the collapse of the Silverado savings & loan, where he was a director. Bush denies charges of impropriety. His lawyer, James Nesland, said Bush's future is uncertain: "I'm not sure he knows."
  • The Case For Action

    The Kurds express the bitter lessons of their history in a single adage: "The Kurds have no friends, except the mountains." Numbering some 25 million ethnically and culturally distinct people, the Kurds may be the world's largest nation without territory. They have been obliged to live under the Turks, Arabs, Persians and Russians. And they have been repeatedly betrayed by Western powers. After World War I, the British promised them an independent state, but reneged in deference to Turkey. In 1975, Secretary of State Henry Kissinger and the Shah of Iran withdrew joint CIA-Iranian support for Kurdish rebels in Iraq, in exchange for Saddam Hussein's signature on a border treaty with Iran. In 1988, the West barely protested when Saddam gassed thousands of Kurds in Halabja. ...
  • Where Was George This Time?

    Where was George?" The old refrain from the 1988 presidential campaign is back. As Kurds were being slaughtered in Iraq, Bush was gone fishing. The columnists who extolled the president for rescuing Kuwait from Saddam were now accusing him of moral perfidy. What happened to the president who sent a half-million troops into the desert to "stand up for what's right and condemn what's wrong"? ...
  • Saint Isabella? Not So Fast

    Although Pope John Paul II is a theological conservative, he has in the last few weeks secretly halted the canonization processes for two potential saints dear to the church's right wing. He ordered an outright stop to the effort to make a saint of Queen Isabella I, the Spanish monarch (1479-1504) who expelled the Jews from Spain, fought the Muslims and presided over the Spanish Inquisition. And he demanded a delay in the canonization process for Josemaria Escriva de Balaguer (1902-1975), founder of Opus Dei, the secretive international organization of conservative priests and laymen. Both candidacies had produced fevered conflict within the Vatican. ...
  • The Case Against Action

    George Bush never said he would help the Kurds and Shiites overthrow Saddam Hussein. He pointedly left it up to "the Iraqi military and the Iraqi people to take matters into their own hands." Bush had no mandate from the United Nations, or anyone else, to intervene in Iraq. His Arab allies and his own instincts told him to keep American troops out of a potentially bloody quagmire. There was a right way and a wrong way to get rid of Saddam, and as Bush saw it, a victory by Kurdish and Shiite insurgents would tear Iraq apart, destabilizing the whole Persian Gulf region. "I condemn Saddam Hussein's brutality against his own people," Bush said last week as a growing chorus of critics accused him of abandoning the rebels. "But I do not want to see United States forces, who have performed with such skill and dedication, sucked into a civil war in Iraq." ...
  • Prince Hal In Portland

    On a wet night in Oregon, Gus Van Sant, Portland's greatest film-maker, is shooting a scene for his new movie, "My Own Private Idaho." In a Biblical loincloth, River Phoenix is about to assume a provocative, not-so-Biblical pose upon a crucifix for the cover of a skin magazine featuring a "G-String Jesus." ...