Newswire

Newswire

  • Nightcrawling In Soho By The Sea

    The view from the wraparound terrace belongs on a postcard, with Ocean Drive and its art deco hotels lined up like neon ships pointed out into the palm trees and the night-black sea. Inside, the sprawling penthouse is pure music video, all cigarette smoke and booming hip-hop bass. It's a Friday night in midwinter and the party of the week - featuring a dozen of New York's finest drag queens, resplendent in towering Las Vegas headdresses, spike heels and satanic leers - is in full swing. Tara Shannon, an Elite model down from New York for a shoot, her third here since September, is amazed. "Where's the war?" she asks. "Where's the recession?" Fashion designer Randolph Duke has just arrived for the weekend by limousine, after a show in Palm Beach. "I could have stayed, but it's boring," he shrugs, watching packs of partygoers elbow for the door and the night's next stop, the cavernous dance club Warsaw. "This is our St-Tropez." ...
  • A Pummeling From The 'Paper Tiger'

    It's sad, really: the Iraqi Army in Kuwait is like a dazed boxer with his dukes down, motionless in the center of the ring as his opponent delivers blow after lethal blow. The fighter knows he can't win, but the referee won't stop the bout. Meanwhile, his manager stands in the corner shouting defiantly for him to fight on. ...
  • 'His Head On A Plate'

    When the Persian Gulf crisis began last August, Saddam Hussein's overthrow was the goal of a hard-line minority in Washington. Early in the crisis, national-security adviser Brent Scowcroft, remembering how the Korean War foundered when the United States pushed north of the 38th parallel, advised President Bush not to aim beyond the withdrawal of the Iraqi troops in Kuwait. For five months, the U.S. position was that if Saddam would leave Kuwait, the United States would deal with him afterward through "containment." ...
  • Detroit Is Talking

    About the possible rise of a second Hoffa in the Teamsters union. James P. Hoffa - as in Jimmy Hoffa - is making a bid to become president of the union, as his notorious father once was. Hoffa, a labor lawyer who has worked with the Teamsters, says he can run for president now that federal racketeering charges against top union officials have been dismissed. But a federal official says Hoffa isn't eligible because he hasn't worked "in the craft." The union was barred from holding elections until the cases were resolved. Hoffa's first test of his "grass roots" strategy will be at the union's nominating convention in June.
  • Do Rude Surprises Lie Ahead?

    Will the real military prognosis please stand up? Last week Gen. H. Norman Schwarzkopf declared the Iraqi Army "on the verge of collapse." In Washington, Pentagon briefers backed off that assessment. "It's not going to be a snap," cautioned Lt. Gen. Tom Kelly. But the divergence was a reminder that weeks of briefings hadn't settled the most critical issues facing U.S. troops before the ground war began: How much damage has Desert Storm really done to Iraq's troops so far? And how will untried U.S. forces handle them if they put up a fight? ...
  • Bush's United Front

    The usual joking and bantering had stopped. The mood in the White House was somber and subdued. The president was said to be weary. "The damn drums keep me up," he said earlier this month, referring to the day-and-night drumbeat of antiwar demonstrators camped out in Lafayette Park across Pennsylvania Avenue. Yet while Bush's usual high spirits were slightly muted, he also seemed calm and resolute. If the White House spinners were to be believed, Bush was Gary Cooper in wingtips, steady and cool at High Noon. Indeed, Bush looked strong and steady when he announced that he had ordered a massive ground assault to begin. The president, who can appear flummoxed dealing with querulous members of Congress, seemed sternly confident about waging a violent ground war against Saddam Hussein. ...
  • Gulf War Edition

    The CW is starting to form on the postwar world. That's why the Democrats, major CW consumers, are so quiet. They want to see what it has to say. ...
  • Fond A Ted

    See Ted win an award. See Jane gaze on lovingly. Turner and Fonda were in New York City last week so he could pick up a lifetime achievement award from the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences. The happy couple hasn't set a wedding date yet, but Jane has been sporting an opal and diamond ring on her left hand since December.
  • Tinkering With Energy

    President Bush's "national energy strategy," unveiled last week, is predictably disappointing. Conspicuously missing is an energy tax, which would force Americans to invest more in energy efficiency. Sadly, the omission was virtually preordained. Everyone wants more conservation, a cleaner environment and lower oil imports. But most Americans don't think they should suffer the least inconvenience in the pursuit of these goals - and politicians, despite the object lesson of the gulf war, won't tell them otherwise. ...
  • 'A Fascinating Expose'

    Here's this week's winner of the unintentionally ironic book-blurb award. Next month William Morrow will publish David Marston's "Malice Aforethought: How lawyers use secret rules to get rich, get sex, get even. and get away with it." One review on the jacket calls it "a fascinating expose of the illegal, corrupt and unethical practices of some members of the legal profession. Those guilty of such practices too often receive only a gentle slap on the wrist." Who wrote the blurb? Former U.S. president, pardoned Watergate offender and lawyer Richard Nixon.
  • Fill It Up

    Lower oil prices aren't necessarily bad news for the oil companies, because of America's love affair with super unleaded. As prices have fallen, premium gas - a highly profitable product - is staging a comeback. Only one in eight cars requires premium, but until last year it accounted for one of every four gallons sold. The Iraqi invasion drove the average price of premium to $1.55 a gallon in October from $1.27 in July, cutting its market share to 15.5 percent. Now with the price down to $1.31, the share is 17 percent.
  • Allied Blitzkrieg

    With an avalanche of ordnance and phalanxes of hard-charging tanks, allied land forces finally swarmed into Kuwait and southern Iraq at 4 o'clock Sunday morning. The defeat of Saddam Hussein's Army was foreordained. But confident American generals had a grander goal in mind: the greatest feat of arms since World War II. They expected tough fighting, they knew there would be allied casualties; they were prepared for Saddam to strike back with poison gas or some other terror weapon. But what unfolded in the desert on Sunday was an unequal contest between the most advanced armored divisions in the history of warfare and a large but crude Third World army already groggy from 38 days of relentless bombing. The issue was not whether the Iraqis would be defeated, but how shatteringly. The allies were after total victory, a victory on such a scale and of such technical elegance that the campaign would be taught in military academies for generations to come, like Hannibal at Cannae or...
  • At The Front Of The Storm

    The faces are still achingly young, even with the months of dirt, cold and fatigue etched across them. For these "Screaming Eagles" of the U.S. Army's 101st Airborne Division, life at their base camp on the Kuwaiti frontier has been a war against tedium and fear. Like their forebears who fought under the division's emblem at Bastogne and the A Shau Valley, they wait for the dogs of war to be unleashed. NEWSWEEK photographer Bill Gentile has spent the last three weeks with the 101st and captured a few moments on the eve of battle. ...
  • Saddam's Last Stand

    And so it began. On battlefields as old as time, George Bush and Saddam Hussein let loose the dogs of war last week. By the half light of the moon, tanks nosed through sand berms, scanned the desert and fired into the darkness. In a polyglot babble, soldiers shouted orders, cursed and prayed while shrapnel whined by their ears. The night sky lit up in terrifying webs of tracers. The ground shook under bombs that left craters the size of baseball diamonds and shells that came whirring in. Only the diplomats were duds now. There was no place to hide, no place to reflect on abstractions like collective security or interests like oil. Common sense had failed to bring around an uncommon enemy. So once again in the Middle East, the future would be written in blood. ...
  • Blasting Down To The Wire

    The horizon was red - not with the dawn, but with fire. Saddam Hussein's Army had detonated explosives planted at oil wells across Kuwait. The attack was only part of a vicious endgame that parallels his pullout at the end of the bloody Iran-Iraq War: Kuwaiti resistance forces say Iraqi troops are executing civilians on the streets. In one case, said a Kuwaiti spokesman, troops displayed a dozen murdered Kuwaitis, some beheaded, some with throats cut - "placed in front of their homes for 36 hours for others to see." ...
  • Confessions Of A Serial Killer

    Kimball is utterly unaware of how truly vacant I am," says Patrick Bateman, the young investment banker who moonlights as a serial killer in Bret Easton Ellis's third and latest novel, "American Psycho" (399 pages. Vintage. $11). By page 275, unfortunately, the reader is way ahead of the private detective who appears only briefly and fecklessly. And way ahead of Bateman, too, who doesn't know when to quit - either killing or talking about himself: The older brother of Sean Bateman, a lead in Ellis's second book, "The Rules of Attraction" (who is in turn a college friend of Clay, the poor-little-rich-boy protagonist of Ellis's 1985 debut, "Less Than Zero"), Patrick Bateman is less a real character than a grotesque nouvelle cuisine meal ordered repeatedly by practically everyone in "American Psycho." Let's see, I'll start with the Harvard man and some bland investment-banker sauce, then a main course of alienation (overdone, please), followed by sexual psychosis topped with whipped...
  • Hey, Brother

    NEWSWEEK has learned that members of Saddam Hussein's own family have urged the Iraqi dictator to make peace with the United States. U.S. intelligence sources say that Saddam's half brother, Barzan Takriti, last week warned Saddam that his regime would be destroyed if he didn't negotiate a withdrawal from Kuwait. Barzan also told Saddam that his inner circle of aides in Baghdad was giving him "false information and bad advice" on the war, the sources say. Barzan, who once headed Iraq's powerful internal security force, is one of Saddam's most trusted confidants. He is now Iraq's representative to the United Nations in Geneva. Barzan's warning is the first glimpse U.S. intelligence analysts have had of the views of Saddam's relatives on the war. The analysts don't see it as a major split in the regime. But, they say, it could indicate a significant crack in the wall of advisers around Saddam.
  • The War Week By Week

    Iraq's Aug. 2, 1990, invasion of Kuwait marked the beginning of the largest military buildup since World War II. Vast military cities sprung up in the desert, complete with hospitals, air-conditioned tents and computers. As George Bush pulled together the allied coalition, diplomates shuttled back and forth to Baghdad to implore Saddam Hussein to back down. He stubbornly refused. One day after the U.N. deadline of Jan. 15, 1991, the allies launched their offensive. ...
  • The Final Push

    Once the ground war began, the feared Iraqi Army threw down its guns, put up its hands and surrendered. When it fought, the allies scored easy victories with few casualties.The main assault--the "left hook" deep into Iraqi territory--proceeded exactly according to plan. The Army's 101st Airborne was airlifted 70 miles into Iraq to set up a forward base for Schwarzkopf's twin obsessions, fuel and supplies. Then they swept north, virtually unopposed, to cut a key Iraqi highway and take up positions in the Euphrates Valley--150 miles southwest of Baghdad--with virtually nothing between them and the Iraqi capital. Behind them came two more armored divisions, while to their right the First Infantry made its own border crossing, followed by the crack British First Armored Division. By noon, the famed Big Red One had taken hundreds of prisoners, and its soldiers were enjoying the euphoria of easy victory. "This is the boringest war I've ever seen," said Sgt. Addison Wembley. "They just...
  • The Story Behind The Story

    As with Operation Desert Storm, "Newsweek's' coverage of the conflict--spanning 20 cover reports, including nine in succession once combat began in January--depended on teamwork. The magazine marshaled the skills, insights, ingenuity and honest sweat of scores of staffers: correspondents, writers, photographers, editors, researchers, technicians and others at home and abroad.On the desert front lines, the gulf war presented special challenges to reporters and photographers. The eight "Newsweek' correspondents who worked in the gulf at various times--including Cairo bureau chief Ray Wilkinson, New York bureau chief Tony Clifton, General Editor C.S. Manegold and Hong Kong bureau chief Melinda Liu--contended with the natural hardships of the desert heat and sand, as well as man-made obstacles such as the restrictions placed on journalists by U.S. military and local authorities. Like the soldiers around them, they found ways to cope. Camped deep in the desert with Marines who had little...