Newswire

Newswire

  • Think Wide, Think Ambitious

    When shopping for spring ties this year, think wide and think ambitious. From Nicole Miller to Beau Brummel, elegant loudness is in. Here's a look at some of this season's flowerings: Here's the spring look to die for: bright but not gaudy, creative but not a novelty act. This could be a killer with a light poplin suit.Does this have spring written all over it or what? Its bright pattern is unmatched, though it risks being a laugher in a couple of years.Lauren, the Oliver Stone of designers, is strangling us with Polo. Wear this around the greensward and become an instant parody.In Europe, the trendy ties are sendups of the traditional American Rep model. Which means that the old wave will hit U.S. shores next season.
  • Rebuke To Gorbachev

    A protest in the face of Soviet troops breaches the barrier of fear ...
  • Injudicious

    Last week, after a four-year investigation, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court censured Judge Paul H. King, 63, for professional and private shenanigans. Among King's sins were public intoxication, public urination and crude public comments about other judges. He was also found to have set unreasonably high bail on black defendants because blacks voted against his brother, Edward, in the 1982 gubernatorial election. Two questions remain: what took the SJC so long? And why is King still a judge anywhere?
  • The Season Of '41

    Fifty summers ago DiMaggio's streak mesmerized the nation as no other sports deed has ...
  • A Boost For Brady

    With the NRA weakened and crime on the rise, new support for gun control ...
  • On Hold

    George Bush's victory tour of the Middle East has been put on hold indefinitely because of the continuing turmoil in Iraq and Kuwait. The president had hoped to visit the region in late April. Now, senior administration officials say the trip is likely to be "kicked down the road." At least one top Bush adviser is recommending that the president send Secretary of State James Baker back for further talks with the Arabs and Israelis in hopes of restarting the peace process. Bush hasn't totally abandoned the idea of a trip, aides say. But "chances are less and less that he will go," says a senior White House official.
  • Wanted: Miracle Workers

    College presidents find it exhausting at the top of the ivory tower ...
  • Computerland

    Computers are becoming routine for Americans: nearly 14 million households now possess one. Other newly released computer statistics: 46 percent of all American children are using computers at school or home. In 1984, 30 percent of kids between 3 and 17 used computers.71 percent of the people who work in the finance, insurance and real-estate industries use a computer on the job.The proportion of homes with computers nearly doubled between 1984 and 1989--from 8 to 15 percent.37 percent of all American workers used a computer at work in 1989 (up from 25 percent in 1984).Women use computers at work more than men (41 percent versus 30 percent).Source:Census Bureau
  • March On Washington

    Elliott, a former editor-in-chief of NEWSWEEK and a former deputy mayor of New York City, is chairman of the Citizens Committee for New York City and a professor at the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism. ...
  • A Messy New World Order

    The new world order is not very new and certainly not very orderly. I'm not talking about the idealized political construct that some people hoped they saw in the United Nations endorsement of collective action against Iraq. I'm only talking about what's out there now - the situation on the ground in the age of Soviet decline, instant long-distance communication and the other large developments that have so profoundly changed political life around the world. What I see is not so much a new age of smart bombs and cooperating statesmen as an age of renewed ethnic strife and evermore numerous antigovernment uprisings - the huge, angry crowd in the street. We have very mixed feelings about both in this country. How are we going to deal with them? ...
  • Deep Defense Cuts

    NEWSWEEK has learned that Defense Secretary Dick Cheney and Joint Chiefs of Staff Chairman Colin Powell plan deeper cuts in the U.S. armed services than they have announced. By 1997, sources say, the Navy will be reduced to 435 battle-force ships - down from today's 545. The Marines are slated to drop to 160,000 - from 196,000. The Army faces the most drastic changes. By 1995, it will be cut to 18 divisions, 12 active and six Reserve - down from 28 divisions, 18 active and 10 Reserve. To cope with the cuts and improve combat readiness of the Reserves, the Army is considering a plan to reorganize two of the six Reserve divisions as Soviet-style "cadre" divisions, each with a peacetime hard core of a few hundred active-duty personnel to train other division reservists. The cadre divisions would be combat ready within 60 days. The other four divisions would be all-Reserve outfits.
  • Equal Rights, Equal Risks

    Nine years ago Gloyce Qualls was a 32-year-old cog on the assembly line at the Johnson Controls battery plant in Milwaukee. As a "burner," she made roughly $350 a week. Standing at a conveyor, she used a torch to heat the lead that formed posts for 40 to 100 batteries a day. In the process, she inhaled oxide from the melting lead. (When the concentration of lead in her blood got too high, she was moved to a cleaner area until the level decreased.) Since lead is toxic, particularly to fetuses, the company in earlier years allowed women to transfer to jobs that were less hazardous - and that often paid less. But in 1982, Johnson Controls imposed a mandatory protection policy. Women of childbearing age could either prove that they were sterile or be forced to change jobs. Several months after being transferred to a $200-a-week position, Gloyce Qualls had her tubes tied. Today she is a stepmother to four children, yet she still rues her decision. "I had no choice," she says. "I had...
  • No Visa

    With friends like these. New Jersey Sen. Frank Lautenberg, traveling with a Senate delegation, had to get a new passport recently because Saudi and Kuwaiti officials refused to honor a passport with a stamp from Israel's Ben Gurion Airport. The 17-member delegation was denied meetings with any member of the Saudi government. Lautenberg has filed a complaint with the State Department. worry that President Bush's latest appointee to the financially strapped center's board, Hollywood producer Jerry Weintraub, won't be much help as a fund raiser. Last fall Weintraub filed for bankruptcy.
  • 'Why Don't They Share?'

    Just four months ago, Helmut Kohl was the toast of Leipzig. Hundreds of thousands of flag-waving Germans filled the university town's Karl Marx Platz to hail the man who promised to rescue them from socialism's failures. "Helmut, Helmut!" chanted the Leipzigers. Last week they had a new name for their leader. Seventy thousand angry people filled the same plaza to condemn the man who promised that "nobody will lose" from German unification. "Liar!" they shouted. "Pig!" ...
  • Bo Knows Disappointment

    Bo Jackson had given himself a wonderful life, the only problem being that everything hinged on his body. Not that it wasn't one hell of a hinge. Bo, at 28, was able to swing from major-league baseball to NFL football and back again, command an estimated $5 million a year in endorsement fees and even, with the help of writer Dick Schaap, knock out a best-selling autobiography. He had a wife, three children and enough money to corner the white-picket-fence market. So far nothing much has changed outwardly - except that sports fans are suddenly seeing their appealingly arch friend from the "Bo knows" commercials in a sad, autumnal light. The reason is simple: just as some sensible but pedestrian observers have long predicted, Jackson's dream of a never-ending season seems to have taken its toll. ...
  • Los Angeles Aftershocks

    First came the video footage, a shocking, silent documentary of police brutality. Last week the Los Angeles Police Department released the transcript of dialogue that made the drama even more chilling. "Oops," read the computer message from the patrol car of Officers Laurence Powell and Timothy Wind. "Oops what?" asked an unidentified officer. The reply: "I haven't beaten anyone this bad in a long time." "Oh, not again," the other officer responded. "Why for you do that?. I thought you agreed to chill out for a while. What did he do?" Said Powell, one of four officers now under indictment for the beating of motorist Rodney King: "I think he was dusted. many broken bones later. after the pursuit." ...
  • 'The Drug Did It': A Tough Sell In Court

    Joseph Wesbecker gained a kind of immortality in death. After his 1989 rampage in Louisville, Ky., he became a symbol: the best-known violent Prozac user. Widows of three of Wesbecker's victims and his son are suing Eli Lilly & Co., Prozac's maker - just a few of about 60 pending civil suits. Prozac has made its way into criminal court, too. More than 20 defendants claim a "Prozac defense": the drug, they say, made them do it. ...
  • Calling A Truce

    Peter Arnett, CNN's man in Baghdad, returned home and found himself in the middle of another cease-fire. Last week, Wyoming Sen. Alan Simpson, who had labeled the correspondent an Iraqi "sympathizer" and questioned his loyalties during the Vietnam War because his brother-in-law was supposedly "active in the Viet Cong," offered a halfbaked apology. In a letter printed in The New York Times, Simpson said he was sorry for "repeating the [unsubstantiated] rumors about Mr. Arnett's family connection to the Viet Cong." (In a Times op-ed a week earlier, Arnett's son Andrew wrote, "My mother, an American citizen, still mourns her brothers. [who] were trapped in [North Vietnam] while she fled to the South. This pain has been compounded by [Simpson's allegations.]") Simpson regretted using the word "sympathizer," saying "dupe" or "tool" would have been more appropriate, and called Arnett's Iraq reporting "repugnant" - a word he repeated on the "NBC Nightly News." Arnett says he accepts the...