Newswire

Newswire

  • The Enforcer: Doctor, Lawyer, Fda Chief

    If anyone should be able to decipher a food label, it's David Kessler. He's an attorney .who teaches food law. He's a physician. And he now heads the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. But don't take him shopping because he's as confused as anyone. "I can't read the nutritional panel," he concedes. "I just don't think in terms of grams." ...
  • Dead Enders

    Sometimes there's just no way of escaping the Grateful Dead. The University of Oregon recently banned the aging '60s rock band from playing at the Eugene campus this summer because stoned Deadheads sometimes wreak havoc on the area during performances. But because of the state's depressed economic situation, the university reluctantly decided to allow the concerts, which could pump as much as $1 million into local coffers. Too late: by that time, the Dead's summer concert schedule was already full and the band decided to keep on truckin', right past Eugene, Ore.
  • Germany: No Thanks For The Memories

    It is the kind of controversy that the new united Germany was bound to confront eventually. The issue: whether Bonn should deport 269 Soviet Jews visiting from Israel. The Jews were originally given three-month visas during the gulf war, when Israel was under attack from Iraq's Scud missiles. Now the war is over and they refuse to go back. "Israel is exotic, but Germany is European and closer to home," says one of the visitors, Esther Margolin. Claus Rosenkranz, their Berlin lawyer, warns: "It would take a massive police force to eject them." ...
  • Ashes To Ashes, But Not With Your Van Gogh

    The French don't have the world's greatest sense of humor. Certainly no one was laughing last week after Japanese industrialist Ryoei Saito suggested his plans for the two most famous paintings in his vast collection: van Gogh's "Portrait of Dr. Gachet" and Renoir's "Le Moulin de la Galette," which cost him a total of $160.6 million just last year. "Put those paintings in my coffin to be cremated with me," said Saito. ...
  • The Littlest Lobbyists

    California state senators are getting the hard sell from some unlikely lobbyists about not repealing state Proposition 98, which guarantees 40 percent of the total budget for education. The pressure group: kids. "If you vote no on Prop 98," wrote one elementaryschool student to Sen. Quentin Kopp, "you might be assassinated by angry parents ... If you do vote no, I hope you do get killed." The state says the kids have been cynically enlisted by teachers and parents. Prop 98 advocates say the students write because they care.
  • Frida On Our Minds

    With a record sale at Christie's and a biography that keeps selling, the late Mexican painter ranks with the greats. Do we need a movie with Madonna? ...
  • Remaking The Cia

    With a change in directors, the agency faces a new challenge: to redefine its methods and its mission ...
  • Buzzwords

    June means weddings. Here's how caterers and consultants talk about their clients: Mother-of-bride. Usage: Loehmann's has a good selection of MOB dresses.Hotel or catering hall that often has more than one wedding going on at the same time. Also, wedding mill.Bride's veil and headpiece.Guest who eats more than his share of hors d'oeuvres. Also see "gas guzzler": someone who runs up the tab at the open bar.Bridesmaid most intent on catching the bouquet.Wedding registry.Afternoon nuptials, like a matinee.Parents, as in, "Look out, here come the bride's units."
  • The Dirt On Shakespeare

    William Shakespeare is a very hot playwright these days. Joseph Papp is producing the entire canon; Sam Wanamaker is trying to build an "authentic" re-creation of the Globe Theatre in London; Soviet acting companies are bringing their productions of Shakespeare's plays to the United States; screen adaptations are box-office hits, and it seems as if every state in this country has a Shakespeare Festival. And we, at The Shakespeare Theatre at the Folger in Washington, D.C., are no exception to this trend. Subscriptions are up, shows are sold out, top actors (movie stars!) are giving up lucerative film salaries to play Shakespearean roles. Our location, two blocks from the Capitol building, means that our audiences are composed largely of congresspersons, senators and Capitol Hill staff. We are a Washington theater. ...
  • A 'Thing' About Updike Stalking A Literary Lion

    Just after he'd finished U and 1: A True Story (179 pages. Random House. $18), Nicholson Baker was dismayed to get a letter from John Updike praising his novel "Room Temperature." "I had to write back," he recalls, "and say, 'I've just finished this, ah, thing about you'." This "thing"-in the book he calls it "this piece of madness"--entails the younger writer's compulsion to measure himself against (arguably) America's most distinguished man of letters. At one point in "U and I" Baker asks his wife if he's a better writer than Updike. Kindly, she says he's smarter. ...
  • Yankee Hugs And Royal Handshakes

    America! Land of the free, home of the brave-and none so free or brave as Alice Frazier, the 67-year-old matriarch who wrapped Queen Elizabeth II in a jovial hug during a royal inspection of her home in a low-income development in southeast Washington. She hadn't been warned against it and she'd announced beforehand she was going to do it, and even though it's not certain that the queen's own grandchildren get to hug Grandma Elizabeth, Her Majesty submit to it gamely. It's just one of those things you do in ... America! A country whose chief of protocol forgot to provide a step for the 5-foot-4 queen to stand on during the welcoming ceremonies on the South Lawn, so that she was virtually invisible behind her lectern. Of course, that could happen anywhere, but only in a country as happy-go-lucky as America would the guilty official then put out a statement that made it all sound like a practical joke. "I thought the queen's hat was so elegant that I wanted Washington and the world to...
  • Carl Icahn Fastens His Seat Belt

    Time was when Carl Icahn could turn most any pile of corporate assets into gold. But the magic of the 1980s no longer works. Last week Icahn abandoned his five-year effort to recast the nation's largest steel company and set his sights on salvaging his 90 percent stake in troubled Trans World Airlines. ...
  • Black To The Future

    Two gritty, independent films attempt to define the volatile new film noir ...