Newswire

Newswire

  • Vogue, Self, Allure--Alex

    Alexander Liberman, cultural czar of a glittery magazine empire, marks 50 years at Conde Nast ...
  • Walking Away From Ryskamp?

    President Bush is publicly standing behind controversial judicial nominee Kenneth Ryskamp of Florida. But Republican officials don't expect the White House will push too hard for him when the Senate Judiciary Committee votes next week on his appointment to the 11th Circuit Court of Appeals. "If we didn't stick with him we'd be admitting a mistake," says a GOP official. But if there's a deadlock, the official says, he should "do the right thing" and withdraw. Ryskamp's been criticized for his membership in a racially exclusive club and remarks from the bench that angered civil-rights groups.
  • Weighing The Anchors

    Those huge network anchor booths that have come to symbolize American political conventions will likely be missing in 1992. Except for CNN, which is committed to full coverage, the networks--facing severe budget crunches--will not pre-empt prime-time programming for four summer nights as they have every election year since the dawn of television. Planning is still in its early stages, but only two or three major speeches are expected to be shown live. There's word at CBS and ABC that Dan Rather and Peter Jennings may anchor the conventions from their studio desks in New York. Apart from the costs involved, the Democrats will meet at New York's Madison Square Garden, considered too small for the booths. The GOP will meet in the Houston Astrodome, which has room--but, given President Bush's popularity, not much potential for real news. "These events have become a four-day press release for the parties, and we're not going to play along," says one network official.
  • Was There A Mutiny On The Ranger?

    The charges have an almost quaint sound, evoking storybook images of Fletcher Christian and Captain Bligh. But the U.S. Navy was deadly serious. In an order issued from the Subic Bay naval station in the Philippines, the Navy officially announced plans to court-martial Airman Apprentice Abdul Shaheed, 22, of Saint George, S.C., and Seaman Apprentice James Moss, 21, of Columbus, Ohio, for "urging disloyalty, mutiny, or refusal of duty." While on duty aboard the aircraft carrier USS Ranger in the "area of the Persian Gulf" last January, the two men allegedly tried to persuade fellow crewmen to sabotage the ship's aircraft-launch system and to kidnap Capt. Ernest E. Christensen Jr., the skipper. The apparent motive: the men were heeding Saddam Hussein's call for a Muslim holy war against the United States and its allies. ...
  • Soviet Edition

    The Moscow CW last week was that the huge demonstration would turn bloody. It didn't. Apparently CW's fallibility there is about the same as in Washington. ...
  • Coerced Confessions: No Harm Done?

    Convicted gun-offender Oreste Fulminante feared for his life after rumors that he had murdered his stepdaughter swept Ray Brook federal prison in New York. Other prisoners began harassing and beating him for being a child-killer. During a stroll around the prison track, inmate Anthony Sarivola offered to protect Fulminante--but first insisted on hearing details of the murder. Agreeing to the peculiar deal, Fulminante admitted that he had choked and sexually assaulted the girl and made her beg for her life before shooting her twice in the head. ...
  • Zoo Story

    To relieve the boredom of captivity, Ruby took up a hobby--painting. The persnickety pachyderm at the Phoenix Zoo insists on choosing her own colors and brushes. Ruby, who first took brush in trunk four years ago, commands roughly $500 a canvas and currently has a wildly popular exhibition at Arizona State. Zoo executive Dick George trumpets, "I bought early, when the price was low."
  • Arms For Sale

    The war showed the danger of weapons dealing--and gave it fresh impetus ...
  • From Hair To Eternity

    At last week's Academy Awards, it was the Year of the Wolf. It was also the Year of the Mousse. Kevin Costner, whose frontier film "Dances With Wolves" had a virtual lock on best picture (which it won, along with six other Oscars), looked more like a city slicker with his greased-up hair. He wasn't the only one. Jeremy Irons, Andy Garcia, Dustin Hoffman, Harry Connick Jr. and Tom Cruise all seemed to have dipped into the Dippity-Do. Nominee and presenter Robert De Niro sported what looked like a flying buttress on the left side of his head. (Daniel Day-Lewis's hair, on the other hand, was simply flyaway.) ...
  • Stats: Now Batting Cleanup

    Remember toting your mitt to the ballpark as a kid? Today you might want to bring a laptop computer. With a new season just around the corner, baseball has gone statistics-mad, and number crunchers are scoring healthy profits. STATS, Inc., in suburban Chicago, uses a network of 500 reporters to chart every detail of the 2,106 regular-season major-league games. How many times last year did Boston's Wade Boggs swing at the first pitch? Thanks to $250,000 worth of computers, STATS can supply the answer (27) in an instant. In 1985 the company claimed only the Chicago White Sox and New York Yankees as regular clients. Now it publishes three books and sells numbers to as many as 15 teams, as well as USA Today and ESPN. ...