Roy Moore Still Thinks Homosexuality Should Be Illegal, Spokesperson Ted Crockett Says

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Republican senatorial candidate Roy Moore rides his horse to cast his vote at a polling location in Gallant, Alabama on December 12. Photo by Joe Raedle/Getty Images

Republican senatorial candidate Roy Moore's spokesperson says the candidate "probably" still believes homosexuality should be illegal.

Ted Crockett appeared on CNN's The Lead with Jake Tapper on Tuesday as voters went to the polls to decide the U.S. Senate race in Alabama. 

"Homosexuality is a sin in the biblical sense," Crockett said. "That is where Roy Moore is in the state of Alabama."

Tapper pressed Crockett, and asked if Moore believes that the Christian bible should be the law of the United States of America. Crockett said the country was founded on Christianity, and Tapper responded asking about the separation of church and state.

"Jake, you don't understand," Crockett said.

"Does he think that homosexual conduct should be illegal? It's a yes or no question," Tapper said.

"Probably," Crockett responded.

When asked what the punishment should be for homosexual conduct, Crockett didn't have a straightforward answer. "It's just a sin," he said.

Moore, who has been accused by multiple women of sexual misconduct when they were teenagers and he was in his 30s, said in 2005 that he believes “homosexual conduct” should be illegal.

In an interview with Bill Press on C-SPAN 2’s After Words, Press read an excerpt from one of Moore’s Supreme Court decisions in which the judge describes homosexuality as “abhorrent, immoral, detestable, a crime against nature and a violation of the laws of nature and nature's God upon which the nation and our laws are predicated.”

Then, Press asked Moore if he thought homosexuality should be illegal.

"Homosexual conduct should be illegal, yes," Moore answered.

He also was suspended from Alabama’s Supreme Court for refusing to recognize the legalization of same-sex marriage nationwide and has urged state governors and legislators to do the same.

In 2006, Moore penned an article titled "Muslim Ellison should not sit in Congress" in reference to Representative Keith Ellison of Minnesota, the first Muslim to serve in Congress. The issue was, of course, brought up in Tuesday's interview, when Moore’s spokesperson also said that he still believes people of Muslim faith should not be allowed to serve the U.S. because they can’t swear on a bible.

However, in order to be sworn into office, a representative can place her hand on any book of faith or even a book of law. When Tapper explained this to Crockett, he was silent.