Saudi Prince Commissioned Porn Movies in Paris but Left Unpaid Bills, $110,000-Lawsuit Says

Saudi Arabia announced it would submit entries to a prestigious film festival in France for the first time this year, but a lawsuit filed in a court in the outskirts of Paris revealed that a member of the royal family had long held an interest in making movies in the country—although not the kind one would show at Cannes.

The late Prince Saud al-Faisal, who served as Saudi Arabia's foreign minister from 1975 to 2015, commissioned adult movies featuring a Moroccan woman, with whom he enjoyed a “close relationship,” and a well-known French porn star, according to the lawsuit brought forward by a French concierge company called SARL Atyla.

The complaint was first made last year, but the evidence in the case, obtained by Newsweek, was submitted to the the High Court in Nanterre, a suburban town west of Paris, earlier this month. Al-Faisal died on July 9, 2015.

The details of the case became known only a few days ahead of Saudi Arabia's Crown Prince Mohammed bin Salman's three-day visit to France, where he arrived on Sunday as part of a global tour to promote his cultural agenda. He has already won France's commitment to set up a national opera and orchestra in Saudi Arabia. He also pledged to submit entries and send a delegation to the Cannes film festival this year, according to Agence France Press.

The Saudi royal family, or at least some of its members, are likely aware of the lawsuit. SARL Atyla’s manager Marc Paulay had been in touch with Saudi royal family employee Francisco Sacoto since 2011, according to company documents included in the evidence, and contacted him in January 2016 over the outstanding payments, but never received the money.

04_09_al-Faisal Saudi Foreign Minister Prince Saud al-Faisal waves as he arrives for an international conference on Islamic State at the French Foreign ministry in Paris on September 15, 2014. A lawsuit claims the late prince left behind unpaid bills for the porn movies he commissioned in France. alain Jocard/AFP/Getty Images

The company is now demanding €90,000, or roughly $110,000, which includes the outstanding amount plus interest, from a company called SCI 25 Avenue Bugeaud, which specializes in the management of family property and is managed by one of al-Faisal’s daughters, Princess Lana Saud al-Faisal, according to online records.

The bulk of the evidence submitted focuses on email and mobile communication exchanges between Paulay, who was tasked with creating the three 45-minute-long pornographic movies, and Boyle Antolin Dugenia, described as Prince al-Faisal’s personal assistant.

The exchanges about the movies span several months over the course of 2011 and discuss the logistics of the films, such as the date and location of the shootings, as well as the scripts, which the prince appear to veto or approve. “He does not like blindfold and being tied. Make a new one,” Dugenia wrote in an email in response to a script describing the female character, played by the prince’s Moroccan friend, being tied up and blindfolded.

In a previous email, Dugenia had given directions for a script involving the woman being unaware that a man is appearing by her side until he begins to touch her, “even slapping her face” with his penis and eventually forcing himself onto the woman. “Important, the man must dominate his companion not with violence but by using his skills and capabilities and his god given gift,” the email noted.

Dugenia also sent Poulay updates as to the health state of the prince, who underwent surgery in 2012. The two stayed in touch at least until 2015, according to the documents, which also include the picture of an editing room in which the two actors are involved in a sex scene, a copy of the woman’s Moroccan passport, as well as evidence that a company managing luxury building in Paris that used to belong to the prince was passed on to the woman.

According to the lawyer representing SCI 25 Avenue Bugeaud, the evidence provided is one-sided and insufficient to prove the claim. The lawyer said their client owes nothing in a document submitted to the court in December 2017 in response to Atyla’s complaint, which was submitted in May that year. The lawyer did not reply to a request for comment from Newsweek.

A preliminary hearing is scheduled for November 15. According the French publication Le Journal de la Dimanche, which first reported on the lawsuit, those who regularly follow the Nanterre High Court are looking forward to the salacious case coming to trial.

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