Soon-Yi Speaks: 'Let's Not Get Hysterical'

In the cacophony of dueling acrimonies rising from the Woody-Mia imbroglio, the one crucially silent voice thus far has been that of the young woman at the heart of the storm, Soon-Yi Farrow Previn, Mia's Korean-born adopted daughter who has become the new love in Woody Allen's life. In the following statement given to NEWSWEEK by Allen's publicist, Soon-Yi finally speaks out for herself

Please don't try and dramatize my relationship with Woody Allen. He was never any kind of father figure to me. I never had any dealings with him. He rarely came to our apartment before his own children were born. Even then, he never spoke and the truth is I never cared that much for him. He was always preoccupied with work and never talked to me. Not really to any of us. Only when Dylan was born did he start visiting regularly and then only to play with the baby. My own father is Andre Previn, who came to visit pretty often and took us all out frequently. When I first got friendly with Woody, he and Mia were finished with their romance and were just friends. I think Mia would have been just as angry if he had taken up with another actress or his secretary. Mia was always very hot-tempered and given to rages which terrified all the kids. They can't speak freely because they're still dependent on her. But they could really tell stories and I'm sure one day will. It's true Mia was violent with me and I have conclusive proof, but I hope she and Woody can somehow head off a custody trial. [Farrow declines to comment on the charges.] The business of him molesting Dylan is so ridiculous that I won't dignify it with a comment. Why Dylan repeats her story is another matter, and a sinister one. I was not surprised that Mia made a videotape of Dylan saying these terrible things as I think the motive is obvious, but I was stunned that the tape would somehow find its way to the TV news. I have a terrific relationship with Woody and realize it's full of dramatic overtones, but it's really quite simple. It revolves around conversations, film talk, sports talk, books and art. He's very quiet and hardworking and finds it amazing and ironic that our relationship is of such interest to people. I don't think Mia should go on adopting children and I think that all her adoptions should have been a warning signal to Woody when he met her. I don't think you can raise 11 (and soon she will have 13) children with sufficient love and care. Take it from one who's lived through it-it can't be done. Some of us got neglected, some got smothered. Anyhow, there's problems. I could say many devastating things about Mia, but I will only do it if I must in a court. From the beginning of their conflict, which I know Woody broke his neck to avoid for the kids' sake, I have refrained from commenting, but when Mia brought up child molestation and then had her sisters and mother and kids and friends parade out in public and do her dirty work for her, climaxing with that tape of Dylan being given out, I felt I had to speak at this point. I'm not a retarded little underage flower who was raped, molested and spoiled by some evil stepfather-not by a long shot. I'm a psychology major at college who fell for a man who happens to be the ex-boyfriend of Mia. I admit it's offbeat, but let's not get hysterical. The tragedy here is that, because of Mia's vindictiveness, the children must suffer. I will always have a feeling of love for her because of the opportunities she gave me, but it's hard to forgive much that followed.