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    The Science of Making Decisions

    The Twitterization of our culture has revolutionized our lives, but with an unintended consequence—our overloaded brains freeze when we have to make decisions.
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    'CSI' Backlash: Forensics on Trial

    When it comes to criminal cases, scientific evidence can seem like cold hard facts. But recently, advocates worry that both bad science and internal corruption is making forensics faulty—and innocent people are going to jail.
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    Apple's Battle With Amazon Over Books on the iPad

    Content is supposed to be king. But in the world of electronic devices, Apple seems to be placing the crown on its own head, apparently believing that its iPad and iPhone are more important to customers than the books, movies, and music they store on them.
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    How to Improve Your Memory With Sleep

    Getting a good night’s sleep has long been known to cement the day’s memories, moving them from short-term storage into long-term holding, but new research shows that it’s not automatic.
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    Dictator-Proofing the Internet

    When authorities in Egypt shut down Internet connections during last week’s uprising, hackers around the world started scrambling to create a work-around. Before they could succeed, the blackout was lifted. But now people are worried that similar shutdowns might occur in countries like Jordan, Syria, and Yemen—and so hackers are working to set up alternative networks in those countries, just in case.
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    Why Some People Choose Anxiety

    Considering that anxiety makes your palms sweat, your heart race, your stomach turn somersaults, and your brain seize up like a car with a busted transmission, it’s no wonder people reach for the Xanax to vanquish it. But in a surprise, researchers who study emotion regulation—how we cope, or fail to cope, with the daily swirl of feelings—are discovering that many anxious people are bound and determined (though not always consciously) to cultivate anxiety. The reason, studies suggest, is that for some people anxiety boosts cognitive performance, while for others it actually feels comforting.
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    Begley: Problems With 'Geo-Engineering' Plans

    It sounded like a panacea for climate change: “geo-engineering” the atmosphere to block some sunlight and counter global warming. Now scientists scrutinizing the approach say it could produce dangerous cascade effects, severely disrupting weather and agriculture—and might fail to block the worst of the greenhouse effects anyway.
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    The Debate Over Digital Mammograms

    There is no evidence digital mammograms improve cancer detection in older women. But thanks to political pressure, Medicare pays 65 percent more for them.
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    Ask a Celebrity Geek

    For people who already have their hands full keeping up with Facebook, scanning Twitter tweets, and answering email too, here’s a heads-up. The cool kids and big egos of Silicon Valley are busy colonizing a new social network—and soon you may want to as well.
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    Left Out of the World Wide Web

    As protests continue in Egypt, the government has cracked down by suspending the country’s Internet service and disrupting much of the cell-phone coverage. Reporters Without Borders closely monitors how nations restrict the Internet access of their citizens. Here are the worst violators.
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    Apple Moves In on Your Wallet

    A chip that links an iPhone to your bank account could break mobile commerce wide open in the U.S. and could be Apple's possible next category killer.
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    Cory Booker's Snowspiration

    Cory Booker used Twitter to help dig out residents of Newark during the last blizzard. Now, with much of the Eastern Seaboard covered in snow, more Americans implored the mayor to come to their aid. While Booker can't be everywhere, ordinary citizens inspired by his example often heeded the call.
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    Very Personal Trainers

    The history of televised fitness is almost as long as the history of television. From syndicated shows to videos on demand, exercise shows have been capturing our attention for years—and making their stars national icons. Here’s a look at some of the most notable figures and biggest milestones in fitness TV.
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    Why Almost Everything You Hear About Medicine Is Wrong

    If you follow the news about health research, you risk whiplash. First garlic lowers bad cholesterol, then—after more study—it doesn’t. Hormone replacement reduces the risk of heart disease in postmenopausal women, until a huge study finds that it doesn’t (and that it raises the risk of breast cancer to boot). Eating a big breakfast cuts your total daily calories, or not—as a study released last week finds. Yet even if biomedical research can be a fickle guide, we rely on it.
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    What an Apple Without Steve Jobs Might Look Like

    Apple CEO Steve Jobs has gone on a medical leave. With luck this will be temporary, like his last medical leave, in 2009, when Jobs, a survivor of pancreatic cancer, received a liver transplant. But what if he doesn’t come back? Ever since the previous time, people have wondered if the company could carry on without him.
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    The Genius Dilemma

    Just how essential is a company’s visionary founder? Apple and Google are about to find out.
  • LIST-nasa-innovations-intro.jpg

    NASA Inventions Headed to Your Home

    NASA’s Spinoff 2010 report, which the agency publishes annually to promote the commercial applications of its investments in technological research, highlights a number of innovations that affect our lives every day. Here are some of the highlights.
  • Steve Jobs's Health: History and Speculation

    On Monday, Steve Jobs announced he was taking a medical leave of absence from Apple Inc. It’s the latest chapter in the visionary CEO’s tale of health woes, a story that began in 2004.
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    Apple Stock Gyrates

    With Apple CEO Steve Jobs back on medical leave—an indefinite one, unlike his last break—the company’s investors, $300 billion worth of them, are forced to envision a post-Jobs Apple. And they didn’t like the thought: shares fell as much as 10 percent before rebounding in overseas trading Monday.
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    Get Smarter

    Many of the concepts that could make us smarter are well established and not particularly abstruse, but not widely known even among the educated.
  • Murdoch, Denton: New Approaches to Web Media

    The new year brings some radical new experiments in online media. First up is The Daily, a publication created by Rupert Murdoch’s News Corp. that’s set to launch this month. You won’t be able to read The Daily on a plain old Web browser. It will exist only as an app on the iPad (and, presumably, later on other tablets as well)—and you’ll have to pay $1 a week for a subscription.