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  • Can Certain Hairstyles and Smells Make a Headache Worse?

    If you're migraine-prone, getting primped for a night out can be a real headache—literally. Certain hairstyles, perfume and even earrings can trigger or worsen a headache."During a migraine, the scalp is hypersensitive," says Dr. Seymour Diamond, founder of the Diamond Headache Clinic in Chicago and executive chairman of The National Headache Foundation. "If you put your hair in a tight bun or [ponytail], you are creating pressure that pulls on the scalp, intensifying the pain." The scalp area becomes more sensitive because of a nervous phenomenon called cutaneous allodynia, which occurs during a migraine, he says. But your choice of hairstyle isn't the only thing that can intensify the pain. Earrings, headbands and even certain smells like perfumes or hairsprays can do it, as well. Migraines are sensitive to certain triggers, including smells, which originate as electrical impulses deep within the brain, Diamond says. The trigger created by the smell then spreads throughout the...
  • The Four Worst Weightlifting Blunders

    Getting a good workout is not just about running on a treadmill or using a stationary bike. Weightlifting is another important part of any gym routine—especially if you're trying to slim down. Increased metabolism from growing muscles can speed up fat loss, and lifting weights can also create stronger skeletal muscles and bones. An hour of vigorous weightlifting can burn just as many calories an hour of playing basketball, according to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. But if you don't train properly you may not achieve the results you want—or, worse, you might even injure yourself. So before you pick up the free weights, take a look at our list of the top mistakes to avoid when weightlifting, according to Joe DiAngelo, a New York City certified personal trainer of more than 10 years. ...
  • The Most Fattening Ice Cream Flavors

    Back in 1961 an enterprising young ice cream maker named Reuben Mattus invented an exotic Danish-sounding name, put a map of Scandinavia on the carton, and America's first commercial "super-premium ice-cream," Häagen-Dazs, was born. All but irresistible to anyone with a sweet tooth, the new treat was also loaded with butterfat. Enter two entrepreneurial hippies named Ben and Jerry with a gift for catchy product names, and you get the battle for the richest frozen dessert. Nowadays any number of premium flavors pack 300 calories and 20 grams of fat—or more—into a mere half cup of ice cream. (Breyer's or Turkey Hill, by contrast, may have half the calories and fat, or less.) Here's a list of the most fattening flavors (all nutrition information is for a half-cup serving). Dieters, beware. ...
  • Health: Can Metal Earrings Irritate Your Skin?

    Everyone loves a bargain; but, when it comes to buying earrings, you may want to dig a little deeper into your wallet. In a study published online this month in the Journal of the American Academy of Dermatology, researchers tested several types of inexpensive earrings and found that nearly one third contained nickel, which can trigger an allergic reaction in some wearers. For the study, Howard I. Maibach, a professor of dermatology at the University of California, San Francisco, and his collaborator, Jacob Pontoppidan Thyssen, M.D., purchased inexpensive (all under $50) earrings from 34 different locations in San Francisco in October 2007. The earrings were then examined with a routine spot test using solutions in order to discover the presence of nickel. Of those earrings, 30.7 percent tested positive for nickel.The presence of the metal may cause allergic contact dermatitis, which can leave you with swollen, reddened and itchy skin. Research has indicated that exposure may also...
  • Surviving Cancer: Advice for Survivors

    The news that Sen. Ted Kennedy has malignant brain cancer turned the spotlight once again on our most relentless foe. Kennedy, the third member of his immediate family to develop cancer, is just one of an estimated 1.4 million people in the country who will be diagnosed this year. In addition, there are nearly 12 million cancer survivors living in the United States....
  • Treatments for Brain Tumors like Ted Kennedy’s

    Researchers at Cedars-Sinai are racing to develop experimental treatments, and even vaccines, for fast-growing malignant brain tumors like the one Sen. Edward Kennedy has been diagnosed with.
  • How to Get Relief from Allergy Symptoms

    An estimated 50 million Americans suffer from some type of allergy, according to the Centers for Disease Control, and many of them are probably sniffling as they read this. Though spring can bring a welcome respite from the winter cold, the season also brings with it the release of allergens like tree pollen and, in humid areas, mold spores, which can trigger reactions in those with allergies. The symptoms include a stuffed or runny nose with a clear discharge, violent sneezing, wheezing, coughing, and watery and itchy eyes. (A yellow nasal discharge, a high temperature or an achy body are signs of a flu). Want to soothe your seasonal symptoms? Here's our short list of tips: ...
  • Herpes: Is a Cold Sore an STD?

    Cold sores--they always seem to pop up when you have a big interview, first date or important event. You know what they look like and what a pain they can be, but are they a sexually transmitted disease? According Dr. Craig Austin, a dermatologist in New York City, cold sores usually aren't a sexually transmitted disease (STD). They are caused by the herpes simplex virus. There are two kinds of herpes virus: HSV-1, which is usually not an STD and occurs on the lip, and HSV-2, which usually causes herpes genitalis, which is essentially an STD in the genital area. Both viruses can be transmitted by saliva, body secretions or oral sex. If you contract either kind of herpes you will always have the virus because the cold sore lives in the sensory nerve and stays dormant in the nerve until outbreaks occur. Some people only get one cold sore in their lives and may not realize they are carrying a latent form of the virus. Even if you don't have a visible cold sore, there's a chance you can...
  • Burma: How You Can Help

    Here are some of the main agencies accepting donations for the victims of Cyclone Nargis.
  • The 9 Unhealthiest Summer Vacation Destinations

    Your summer vacation should be a chance to escape the stresses of everyday life. But how much can you relax, really, if you're in an area that's unhealthy, unsafe or uncomfortably hot or humid? No place is perfect, of course, or entirely immune to crime, pollution and bad weather. But statistically speaking, there's a higher risk that you'll encounter one or more of those summer vacation spoilers in one of these nine destinations: ...
  • Are Mineral Water Facial Sprays Worth the Money?

    Evian dreamed up a creative way to sell even more of its bottled mineral water: by repackaging and marketing it as a revitalizing spray for your face. A 5 oz. bottle of the mineral water mist sells for $10 on sephora.com, which touts the product as a way to rehydrate and invigorate tired skin. Other brands say their water sprays will moisturize skin and combat fatigue. But the pricey bottles probably aren't that much better for your skin than putting regular tap water in a spray bottle, or just washing your face, says New York-based dermatologist Dr. Jennifer Levine. Water sprays are useful mostly to refresh skin after a long, dry plane ride, or to reset makeup at work. But in most cities the tap water is clean enough to use as a substitute, Levine says. And water is only useful as a temporary hydrator: "When water evaporates, it could also take things [like natural protective oils] away from the skin at the same time." Levine says she can think of only one clear benefit of using...
  • MIT’s Green Energy Club

    It's a Monday night at MIT, just a few weeks before final exams. Grad students Tegin Teich and Todd Schenk could be studying or relaxing. Instead, they're hustling through a maze of basement hallways in search of notorious energy hogs: vending machines. The average soda dispenser consumes 3,500 kilowatts a year—more than four times the juice for a home refrigerator. To conserve electricity, MIT's administrators have been installing devices called Vending Misers, which use motion detectors to turn off a machine's lights and cooling systems when people aren't nearby, cutting energy consumption by 50 percent. Trouble is, MIT isn't exactly sure where all its vending machines are located, or which ones already have the devices installed. So tonight it's enlisted the MIT Energy Club to help figure it out.It's just one event on the club's very busy calendar. With 750 students, the four-year-old group is MIT's fastest-growing extracurricular organization. Many of its members aim to build...
  • The Four Worst Home Acne Cures

    Teens (and some adults) will try almost anything to quell an outbreak of acne, but many traditional home remedies may do more harm than good.