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  • Tehran's Secret 'Department 9000'

    President bush said last week he expects a "bloody" summer in Iraq. What he didn't say is that a growing covert war between the United States and Iran may be one reason the conflict is escalating. U.S. intelligence has identified the principal unit behind Tehran's efforts to supply Shia insurgent cells in Iraq. It is a super secret group called Department 9000, which is part of the elite Quds Force of the Iranian Islamic Revolutionary Guard Corps, according to three U.S. officials familiar with intelligence reporting and analysis on the Iraqi insurgency who asked for anonymity when discussing sensitive material. Department 9000 acts as a liaison between the insurgents and the IRGC, the Iranian regime's principal internal-security mechanism, providing guidance and support. More recently, says one of the officials, these secret Iranian paramilitaries have even begun to help Sunni insurgent groups in order to keep the Americans bogged down. "The new developments with Sunni groups are...
  • Health: Let The Bugs In

    Not all bacteria are unfriendly. Some, like probiotics, are good for us: they coat our digestive tracts and may ward off yeast infections, stomach upsets and allergies.The University of Michigan's Dr. Gary Huffnagle, author of "The Probiotics Revolution," says most adults don't get enough of them: "Your intestinal environment is shaped by what you eat, and foods high in refined sugar and antibiotics can kill off those good microbes." To help those good bugs flourish, eat probiotic-rich foods like yogurt, kimchi, pickles, miso soup and aged cheese. Or try supplements. For supplement reviews: consumerlabs.com/results/probiotics.asp.
  • Rivers of Doubt

    The common white sucker is nobody's favorite fish. It's a bottom feeder that trout fishermen in Colorado happily toss back into the water. But it's also what scientists call a sentinel—a species whose health (or lack thereof) can warn us about problems in the environment. So imagine the reaction of environmental endocrinologist David O. Norris of the University of Colorado when he discovered some alarming changes in the sucker population of Boulder Creek. Upstream, where the water flows pure and clear out of the Rocky Mountains, the ratio of males to females is 50-50, just as nature intended. Downstream, below the wastewater-treatment plant in Boulder, the females outnumber the males by 5 to 1. Even more worrisome, Norris found that about 10 percent of the fish were neither clearly male nor female, but had sexual characteristics of both. "On the one hand, we were excited [to make such a dramatic finding]," says Norris. "At the same time, we were appalled."There's something fishy in...
  • The Editor's Desk

    Long ago, Mary Carmichael, the author of both this week's cover story on pain and a long piece on the global water crisis, wanted to be a doctor. Medicine's loss was journalism's gain, but at a price: some sea urchins had to give their lives along the way.I will let her explain: "Before I wanted to be a journalist," Mary says, "I wanted to be a biologist. (It was my parents' fault; they had hundreds of dusty old copies of National Geographic in the attic.) I also thought about being a doctor. But when I got to my senior year in high school, I started an AP biology project breeding sea urchins and promptly managed to kill 45 of them by mistake. As ?sea urchins die, their spines all slowly fall off. You can imagine how traumatic this was—for them, obviously, but also for me—why medicine really wouldn't have been the right career path."The shift from possible practitioner to journalist is common in our world; Sharon Begley (who also has two significant offerings in the magazine this...
  • Web Sites: Virtual Real Estate

    Hunting for a new home? Real-estate Web sites are rolling out snazzy features, like satellite maps and home-value calculators, to make finding your next pad simple, educational and fun. A roundup.
  • The Checklist

    RENT "The Third Man" The new two-DVD set of the Carol Reed-Graham Greene 1949 classic stars Orson Welles as the charmingly immoral Harry Lime. Set in post-WWII Vienna, this atmospheric thriller is as good as it gets.HEAR "Perry Farrell's Satellite Party: Ultra Payloaded." Former Jane's Addiction frontman Farrell unleashes his newest art-rock experiment just in time for the revamped Lollapalooza. Think funk, garage rock, interplanetary party. A pure blast from pop's outer limits.READ "I Love You, Beth Cooper" by Larry Doyle. Nerd lets head cheerleader know he loves her—in a high-school graduation speech. High jinks ensue. Unoriginal, you say. You're mistaken. Fresh, sweet, seriously funny.GO to the Red Earth Festival, one of the nation's largest Native American heritage festivals, in Oklahoma City, June 1-3.TRY Pur's new Flavor Options. Add strawberry, raspberry or peach flavor to your filtered water without adding sugar, calories or dyes (pitcher, about $35; flavor cartridge, $10).
  • Israeli Veterans: PTSD and Paranoia

    Israelis have always been something of a reluctant authority on the subject of posttraumatic stress. Experts estimate that 15 percent of the Jewish state's combat wounded—more than 3,000 vets—suffer from some form of the disorder. It's unclear how much PTSD costs the country each year, but one veteran of Israel's Yom Kippur war, who didn't want to be identified to protect his privacy, told NEWSWEEK that he gets roughly $2,000 per month. His symptoms, he says, began with headaches and nightmares, and later developed into severe asocial behavior. "I didn't understand what was happening to me," he recalls. Eventually he began avoiding even the most benign gatherings like barbecues, he says, because they reminded him of "the barbecue of human beings." At times, he felt as if he were being followed.Actually, he was being followed. In a petition filed last week with Israel's High Court of Justice, a veterans group accuses Israel's Defense Ministry of hiring private investigators to tail...
  • How to Increase Paranoia

    Israelis have always been something of a reluctant authority on the subject of posttraumatic stress. Experts estimate that 15 percent of the Jewish state's combat wounded—more than 3,000 vets—suffer from some form of the disorder. It's unclear how much PTSD costs the country each year, but one veteran of Israel's Yom Kippur war, who didn't want to be identified to protect his privacy, told NEWSWEEK that he gets roughly $2,000 per month. His symptoms, he says, began with headaches and nightmares, and later developed into severe asocial behavior. "I didn't understand what was happening to me," he recalls. Eventually he began avoiding even the most benign gatherings like barbecues, he says, because they reminded him of "the barbecue of human beings." At times, he felt as if he were being followed.Actually, he was being followed. In a petition filed last week with Israel's High Court of Justice, a veterans group accuses Israel's Defense Ministry of hiring private investigators to tail...
  • Rivers of Doubt

    When Lewis Ziska wanted to see how a warmer world with more carbon dioxide in the air would affect certain plants, he didn't set up his experiment in a greenhouse or boot up a computer model. He headed for Baltimore. Cities are typically 7 degrees warmer than the countryside, as well as big sources of CO2. Although global levels of this greenhouse gas have reached 380 parts per million compared with preindustrial levels of 280, cities have way more—450 in Baltimore, 550 in Phoenix, 700 on a bad day in New York. So Ziska, a plant physiologist at the U.S. Department of Agriculture, compared ragweed growing in vacant lots in Baltimore with ragweed in rural fields—and discovered the dark side of sunny claims that global warming will produce a "greening of planet Earth." Urban ragweed grows three to five times bigger than rural ragweed, starts spewing allergenic pollen weeks earlier each spring and produces 10 times more pollen. In as few as 20 years the whole world will have CO2levels...
  • A Nobel Winner Pioneers the Personal Genome

    It would be a mistake to think that reaching the age of 79 has mellowed James Watson. Fifty-four years after he discovered, with Francis Crick, the structure of DNA, and 45 years after sharing the Nobel Prize for it, he delights in provocation just as much as when he made his reputation as the bad boy of molecular biology, bulldozing colleagues and competitors (and using crucial data generated by one, Rosalind Franklin) in his headlong race to the double helix. In the years since, Watson built Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory in New York into a biology powerhouse, briefly led the Human Genome Project—and endorsed designer babies, genetic engineering to make "all girls pretty" and curing "stupidity" through genetics. Which makes his words this rainy May morning at the lab all the more surprising.Two years ago Watson agreed to become the first person to have his genome sequenced and made public. A biotech company, 454 Life Sciences, has now determined, from a blood sample, every one of...
  • Perspectives: Quotes in the News

    "There were times I crossed the line."Monica Goodling, a former Justice Department aide, testifying before Congress that she inappropriately made political beliefs a factor in hiring"There has been no water and electricity since Sunday, and we don't know what is happening until we get in and get the wounded out."John Holmes, the U.N. under-secretary-general for humanitarian affairs, on the nearly 30,000 Palestinian refugees living in Lebanon who began to flee their camp after the Lebanese military attacked Islamic militants in the area"It could be a bloody—it could be a very difficult August." ...
  • Capital Sources: The Art of Interrogation

    For two years now, a group of experts on interrogation has been helping intelligence agencies formulate new rules for grilling terrorism suspects. Comprising psychologists and other specialists, the group has completed one long report and is working on another. Both volumes describe the techniques the United States has used on Iraqi and Al Qaeda suspects since the attacks of September 11, 2001, as outdated and often ineffective. Steven Kleinman is one of the study’s contributors. A former Air Force interrogator and trainer, Kleinman grilled prisoners in several conflicts, including the current war in Iraq. While doing graduate work in the late 1990s, he researched the interrogation of senior Nazi officials by Americans during World War II. Kleinman spoke recently to NEWSWEEK’s Dan Ephron. ...
  • Reagan: How Serious Was the Kaddafi Threat?

    The comments are matter of fact; the threat is stark. It was late November 1981, around Thanksgiving, Ronald Reagan recalls in his diaries, that he and his top aides first learned of a purported assassination plot instigated by Libya’s eccentric leader, Muammar Kaddafi. “A 'hit band' is supposed to have crossed into the U.S. by way of Canada with me, George B. [presumably Vice President George H.W. Bush], Al Haig [then secretary of State] and Cap W. [presumably Caspar Weinberger, then secretary of Defense] (any or all) as targets." The suspected mastermind ? "Our friend in Libya," the late president wrote in “The Reagan Diaries” (edited by Douglas Brinkley; published this month by HarperCollins).A few days later, Reagan wrote about a National Security Council meeting to discuss what to do about Kaddafi. "No conclusions reached except that we can't do anything until we find an answer to the 1,700 Americans still working in Libya." Reagan only makes a handful of references to the...
  • Alter: Iraq Is Not Vietnam--Or Korea Either

    President Bush thinks the Vietnam analogy for Iraq is wrong. Aside from the predictability of this (it’s understandable that he doesn’t like his policy called a “quagmire”), the president’s reasoning is historically ignorant. Bush said last week that the difference between Vietnam and Iraq is that the enemy in Vietnam didn’t want to follow us home. Of course during the Vietnam War, President Lyndon Johnson repeatedly made precisely that argument, comparing communists to burglars who must be stopped when they are in the neighborhood (in that case, Southeast Asia) before they came up on the porch and into the kitchen.This argument was phony 40 years ago—the “domino theory” of noncommunist countries toppling over proved false—and it’s phony now. The idea that we’re fighting “them” (whoever “they” might be) there so we don’t have to fight them here is lousy logic, now echoed by several GOP candidates for president. Consider the true enemy—Al Qaeda in Iraq, which we have good reason to...
  • Full Speed Ahead

    Lindsay Lohan is back in rehab. Back? Wasn’t she just there? Fellow bad girl Britney Spears wasn’t in long enough for her hair to grow back. Meanwhile, Paris Hilton zipped right by rehab and picked up the GO DIRECTLY TO JAIL card.In the last year or so, rehab has become the ultimate publicity tool, a brief break from the glitzy life, a chance to burnish one’s reputation. (The bad girls aren’t alone in this regard; see Mel Gibson, Isaiah Washington.) What we’ve forgotten is that rehab is supposed to result in rehabilitation. Hence the name. Rehabilitating one’s life, when it’s broken and damaged, is not just a weekend stay.I never went to rehab. I should have. I plunged willingly, desperately, into addiction at the pliable age of 15. My poison, my love, was speed. It came in pretty colored tablets called amphetamines. Over the years it changed to capsules--some clear with orange and black granules inside, some pure black. Like the devil. Like hell.Like the hell I lived in well into...
  • Hirsh: Icy G8 Meeting for U.S., Russia

    It wasn’t like Harry and “Uncle Joe” at all. Or was it? Sixty-two years ago, here at Potsdam, Harry Truman and Joe Stalin seemed to get along famously, putting on a display of bonhomie that belied how fast their relationship was about to go into a deep freeze. During the conference after the surrender of Nazi Germany, the U.S. president quietly received a message that said, “Babies satisfactorily born,” meaning the world’s first successful atomic test had just occurred at Los Alamos, N.M. The cold war—and the start of a four-decadelong arms race—was just a year or so away. On Wednesday, representatives of the major powers met again in the Berlin suburb of Potsdam, this time for a G8 meeting. Such gatherings are typically relentlessly amiable, and so the delegates tried to make it this time. But beneath the forced grins, U.S. Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice and Russian Foreign Minister Sergei Lavrov exchanged icy, even scary, words that suggested a new cold war is not...
  • Interview: When Mothers Kill Their Kids

    What drives a mother to kill her own children? Gabriel Estrada did not leave any real clues about why she hanged her four young daughters before taking her own life in their Texas trailer home on Tuesday. (Three of the girls, aged 5, 3 and 21 months died; her 8-month-old baby survived.) Estrada, 25, brought to eight the number of Texas women who have murdered their children since the 2001 tragedy in which Andrea Yates drowned her five children in the bathtub.  But while gruesome multiple murders like these make the headlines, government statistics show that hundreds of children around the nation die from abuse or neglect every year—often at the hands of a caregiver like a parent, foster parent or nanny.  NEWSWEEK's Alexandra Gekas spoke with Dr. Margaret G. Spinelli, an infanticide specialist at the Columbia University College of Physicians and Surgeons, about whether any lessons can be learned from the Estrada case. Excerpts: ...
  • NEWSWEEK Archives: Bill and Hillary Clinton

    Hillary Clinton has a new guru, a corporate communications consultant named John Kao, who preaches a creative process he calls "jamming" or "getting to cool." Of course if cool is her destination, this Clinton has a long journey ahead. The jazz Kao uses as his metaphor to get clients to an improvisational state of "relaxed knowingness" is more often associated with a certain easy-listening senator from Illinois.Hillary is strong. Hillary is smart. Hillary is not cool. Even the effort to rebrand her as softer, more heartfelt and more in touch with working-class women may prove impossible. That's because after two decades in national life, the brand is set. We know her—and him. Or think we do. The threshold question for voters is less about putting the first woman in the White House than the second Clinton.The obsession with polls, consultants, money—even positions on the issues—obscures the fundamental dynamic of the Democratic primary race: Restoration vs. Inspiration. A Clinton...
  • Terreform: Building Houses Out of Living Trees

    Want a treehouse? A New York architect is taking orders for buildings constructed out of—and by—living trees. Mitchell Joachim developed the Fab Tree Hab with some colleagues while at MIT, but now he's gone past the conceptual stage with his nonprofit, Terreform.The idea is to allow plants to grow over a computer-designed plywood structure. Once the plants are interconnected and stable, the plywood is removed and reused. Joachim is experimenting with Israeli plants that grow quickly and develop an interwoven root structure that's soft enough to "train" over the plywood, but then hardens into a more durable structure. The inside walls would be conventional clay and plaster.It may take a while before houses are actually built. And the growing nature of the homes present challenges. One is with zoning: no municipality wants to grant a construction permit to a home that keeps changing. Windows are another problem. Joachim is experimenting with soy-based windows that could stretch with a...
  • Bad Blood Among the President's Men

    Former deputy attorney general James Comey gave a riveting account of a hospital-room confrontation over President George W. Bush's warrantless-wiretapping program. But Comey's testimony last week told only part of the story of the clash sparked when Alberto Gonzales, then White House counsel, and the then White House chief of staff Andrew Card tried to get an ailing John Ashcroft to recertify Bush's supersecret surveillance activities. The dispute began in early March 2004, when Attorney General Ashcroft—after being briefed by Comey—agreed the classified program was unlawful and should no longer be approved. Right after that, Ashcroft became ill with pancreatitis, was rushed to the hospital and had his gallbladder removed on March 9. (Ashcroft's powers had been temporarily transferred to Comey.) The next evening, when he learned that Card and Gonzales were headed to see a sedated Ashcroft to get him to recertify the program, Comey rushed to the hospital to intercept them. When...
  • Road Test: Chevrolet Aveo LS

    The Chevy Aveo isn't luxe, and my tester was banana yellow, which didn't help. But this peanut of a car is all right. For the pipsqueak price of $12,515, it gave me reliable transportation and was spacious enough to accompany me on errands and sport around my friends. Its gas mileage is admirable—especially now that pumps in my area are nearing $4 a gallon. And it gets good fuel efficiency without the added price premium of a hybrid.The 2007 Aveo is slightly longer and wider than its '06 predecessor and rides on 14-inch standard wheels (15-inchers are optional). It comes pretty stripped down, with manual mirrors and door locks and crank windows. That didn't bother me, but my son balked when he actually had to flex a muscle to lower the window. Power windows and keyless entry are options but my LS tester did come with standard AC. Though the ride is nothing to thrill about, the Korean-built Aveo is slightly sportier than the last generation, thanks in part to new stabilizer bars for...
  • Coming Soon?: Pain-Free Inoculations

    If you've popped a quick-melting Listerine strip into your mouth lately, you may have tasted the next big idea in vaccines. Johns Hopkins University just announced that a team of biomedical-engineering students working with Aridis Pharmaceuticals has tapped breath-mint technology as a potentially revolutionary way to inoculate infants and children.Any parent can spot the benefits: less painful than an injection, more effective than a spilling spoonful of liquid, these cellophane-like strips are simply placed on the tongue, where they melt in seconds and are easily swallowed. The real boost is to the developing world. Most vaccines must be shipped, stored and administered in a consistent "cold chain," which is difficult and costly for aid organizations working in the heat of Africa. Last year Aridis, a San Jose, Calif., biotechnology company, developed a vaccine for rota-virus—a diarrheal disease that kills some 600,000 children worldwide each year—that works at room temperature, and...
  • Uncorked: Organic Wines

    Wine makers place great emphasis on site and soil, so it's no surprise that the industry is going green. Wine Spectator's June 30 issue explores sustainable wine making in America, but producers around the world use a variety of similar practices. A few examples:
  • Mail Call: Will History Repeat Itself in 2008?

    Readers were intrigued by our cover story on Harry Truman's political courage and how today's presidential hopefuls compare. Some doubted we would see another Truman. "How can we get a president with his political courage today," one asked, "when candidates must raise millions of dollars to get elected?" Another said, "Today the news media would label President Truman immoral and a drunk because he enjoyed poker with his friends and bourbon on the rocks." Others believe Barack Obama, Hillary Clinton, Bill Richardson and other Democratic presidential hopefuls have "that Truman courage and fortitude," as one put it. Some pointed to Republicans like Ronald Reagan, Dwight Eisenhower and George W. Bush. "We already have our Truman in President Bush, except his fight in Iraq is called stubbornness," one said. "What we need is a reincarnation of the man who finally won the cold war: a new Ronald Reagan."What a delight for your magazine to have arrived on May 8, Harry Truman's 123rd...
  • Barry Bonds: What Are the Odds?

    Before the baseball season, the online gambling site Bodog.com offered a bet on whether Barry Bonds would break baseball's career home-runs record in 2007. With Bonds healthy and on a hot streak, that bet is off the board. But you can still wager on virtually everything else.On the Bodog site, for example, you can bet the series (June 22 to 24 in San Francisco is the 7-2 favorite), the inning (the first inning is favored at 3-1) and the count (one ball and one strike is top choice at 3-1) when Bond's 756th home run will occur. Chief oddsmaker Richard Gardner says "proposition bets" (wagers on questions other than game outcome) are fun for his crew. "Our baseball work is largely mechanical," he says. "This is one time we get to use our creative side." While Bonds's career tendencies were researched to determine certain odds, some "props" can be rather arbitrary. You can bet, for example, on whether the person who catches the record blast will be older or younger than 37½. While...
  • A Life in Books: Alexander McCall Smith

    What do Botswana and Scotland have in common? The good fortune to be the settings for the novels of Alexander McCall Smith, who conjures his two homelands with immense charm and warmth. What books does he get cozy with? A classic that, on rereading, disappointed: Alan Paton's "Cry, The Beloved Country." Still a great book, but it has not aged well. A Certified Important Book that you haven't read: "A Brief History of Time," by Stephen Hawking. I tried; I really tried.
  • Christian Dior's New Floral Jewels

    In the true spirit of spring, design houses are creating haute couture jewelry that metamorphoses at its wearer's whim. Christian Dior celebrates seasonal fantasy with Belladone Island, a blossoming 17-piece collection. Flower-shaped pieces made of deeply colored lacquers over yellow and white gold surrounding rubies, diamonds and rough Ethiopian opals open up to reveal miniature gem-encrusted pistils (prices on request, 212-931-2998). Lata K Designs' jewelry collections are set with diamonds, sapphires and freshwater pearls, and convert from brooch to ring to choker. Founded by Lata Sasson, the firm employs high-tech designs springing from a family legacy that goes back five generations. Her ancestors were jewelers to the royal family of Sind, India ($2,500 to $12,780; latakdesigns.com).
  • Book Excerpt: 'The Good Husband of Zebra Drive'

    It is useful, people generally agree, for a wife to wake up before her husband. Mma Ramotswe always rose from her bed an hour or so before Mr J.L.B. Matekoni—a good thing for a wife to do because it affords time to accomplish at least some of the day's tasks. But it is also a good thing for those wives whose husbands are inclined to be irritable first thing in the morning—and by all accounts there are many of them, rather too many, in fact. If the wives of such men are up and about first, the husbands can be left to be ill-tempered by themselves—not that Mr J.L.B. Matekoni was ever like that; on the contrary, he was the most good-natured and gracious of men, rarely raising his voice, except occasionally when dealing with his two incorrigible apprentices at Tlokweng Road Speedy Motors. And anybody, no matter how even-tempered he might be, would have been inclined to raise his voice with such feckless young men. This had been demonstrated by Mma Makutsi, who tended to shout at the...
  • The Editor's Desk

    Very little in life is truly unprecedented, but the subject of our cover this week is, in fact, wholly new in American history: the spouse of a former president has never before sought election to the presidency. From the Adamses to the Bushes, sons have done so, and daughters no doubt one day will, but the campaign of Hillary Rodham Clinton is giving dynastic politics—usually understood in America as a son's following a father's path in public life—a decidedly different twist.The 2008 race is the latest in a series of firsts for the Clintons. Bill Clinton was the first boomer to win the presidency (he was, in the biographer David Maraniss's phrase, "First in His Class"); he was also the first—and only—20th-century president to be impeached. With her health-care initiative, Hillary Clinton was the first First Lady to lead an attempted major overhaul of domestic social policy in traditional political and legislative terms; she was also the first—and only—20th-century First Lady to...
  • The Checklist: Our Picks for the Week Ahead

    RENT "Straight Time." This gritty, hypnotic 1978 sleeper features one of Dustin Hoffman's greatest, and least-known, performances as a self-destructive ex-con strung out on crime.GO to the Shuttle Launch Experience at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, opening May 25. Find out firsthand how astronauts feel as they launch into space. (Included in admission price, $38; kids, $28)HEAR "The Sun and the Moon" by The Bravery. This follow-up to their 2005 debut is produced by Brendan O'Brien (Pearl Jam), who has kept the band as moody and melodramatic as ever.READ "A Thousand Splendid Suns" by Khaled Hosseini. This novel about two women in war-torn Afghanistan promises to be just as good, if not better, than Hosseini's best-selling first book, "The Kite Runner."VOTE in the MTV Movie Awards Spoof Contest by May 29 and see the winner accept a golden popcorn bucket when the show airs on June 3. Vote at mtvmovieawards.yahoo.com.
  • Sol Trujillo on Running Global Companies

    To run global companies, boards often want chief executives with global experience—and few have more of it than Sol Trujillo. In the last decade Trujillo has run telecom companies on three continents: U.S. West in the United States, Orange in the United Kingdom and, since 2005, Australia's Telstra, which he's leading through a transition from being a government-controlled utility to a free-market communications company. In the latest in his series of interviews as part of the NEWSWEEK-Kaplan M.B.A. program, NEWSWEEK Chairman and Editor-in-Chief Richard M. Smith spoke with Trujillo about the lessons of his around-the-world career. Excerpts: ...
  • Luggage: Wheels In the Sky

    Don't want the airlines to lose your luggage? Avoid the risk by carrying your bags onboard. These lightweight rollers meet airline size restrictions, and they're fashion accessories. Tumi Vista Collection 20-inch Super Light Wheel-A-Way. Tumi's best-selling line is made of durable nylon with leather trim and has a contrasting colorful water-repellent lining (tumi.com). Samsonite Scope. Hip lounge designer Marc Newson puts his futuristic look on this ultralightweight mesh-and-foam roller with an extra interior zippered compartment and mesh inserts (samsonite.com). Delsey Helium Fusion. Exceptionally lightweight, durable and inexpensive, this 21-inch roller expands an extra 2.5 inches in width so you have room for all those tchotchkes (delseyluggage.com). Hartmann Luxe. This wool-and-leather-trimmed 22-inch roller is too gorgeous to check. Includes removable garment, shoe and cosmetics bags, has interior compartments and can expand two inches in width (hartmann.com).
  • The Missing Terrorist

    The Bush administration once proudly trumpeted its capture of terrorist leader Ibn al-Shakyh al-Libi-a key source for the assertion that Iraq helped train Al Qaeda in biochem weapons. His story has since been discredited. Where is he now?
  • Q&A: Inside the Wedding Industry

    Here comes June—and that means weddings and more weddings. In "One Perfect Day," Rebecca Mead examines how the bridal industry has turned the wedding into a shopping expedition. She spoke to Raina Kelley. ...
  • Jerry Falwell, 1933-2007

    Jerry Falwell loved his jet. in 1980, it was no small thing for a preacher to have one, even if he was a preacher with a TV show, "The Old Time Gospel Hour." The plane was a Lear, he told me as we climbed aboard on a September day in that crucial year, "specially reconfigured by an Israeli company." He saw this as providential—as if the jet had been anointed by the engine oil of the Holy Land. And it was dart-quick. His congregation, Thomas Road Baptist, was locked away in the Blue Ridge town of Lynchburg, Va. With the plane, he could roam the Bible belt, from Okeechobee to Oklahoma. This trip, the destination was Alabama.We lifted off with a prayer in the name of Jesus, but the flight wasn't aimed at saving souls. It was about electing Ronald Reagan. With the advice and financial backing of national conservative and GOP activists, Falwell had launched a group he had the chutzpah to call the Moral Majority. The goal was to use the then-new tactics of "independent" grass-roots...
  • Politics: Fred Thompson's Little Red Truck

    Folks in Franklin, Tenn., think they'll know when Fred Thompson decides to run for president. Parked in Thompson's mother's driveway is the rusting red Chevy pickup that the former senator turned actor drove all over the state during his two U.S. Senate campaigns. He drove the truck to Washington in 1994 after he was elected to fill an unexpired term and used it as a populist stunt again during his re-election campaign, often giving speeches from the lowered tailgate. "People are watching that truck like hawks," says the Southern Baptist Convention's Richard Land, who also lives in Franklin. "Nobody can imagine he won't use it if he runs."Thompson isn't the only one under surveillance. Politics junkies and rival campaigns have been looking for signs among other potential candidates. Pundits are watching Al Gore's waistline under the theory that the former veep will slim down if he decides to seek the Democratic nod. Will Michael Bloomberg run? Contact with Ross Perot and his...
  • Clift: Bush Is Right on Immigration

    The immigration deal worked out between Senate leaders and the White House is an unwieldy compromise nobody much likes. Democrats will mostly support it because the liberal lion, Ted Kennedy, is leading the charge. And the fact that right-wing Republicans are worked up into such a lather about the bill may give some Democrats enough reason to back it.President Bush is at war with his own party, tearing it apart over an issue that was supposed to be the GOP’s ticket to an enduring governing majority. In his Rose Garden press conference Thursday, he pleaded with lawmakers to recognize that the way they deal with the estimated 12 million illegal immigrants is about “the heart and soul of America,” a country founded by immigrants. “I would rather they come here legally than stuffed in the back of an 18-wheeler,” Bush said.Bush has the right instincts when it comes to immigration policy. He was elected governor four years after Pete Wilson took the statehouse in California and made...
  • Hirsh: Debunking Nuclear Myths

    These are not happy times on the nuclear proliferation front. Iran this week defied yet another 60-day U.N. deadline ordering it to stop enriching uranium, the International Atomic Energy Agency reported Wednesday. That could put Tehran within sight of a bomb in the next couple of years. Turkey, which fears being left out of the European Union, has recommitted itself to developing nuclear power. Several Arab countries, anxious over being left behind in the arms escalation between a nuclearized Iran and Israel, are beginning to do more than merely talk about developing nukes on their own. According to Western intelligence and the IAEA, nations such as Saudi Arabia and Egypt are developing infrastructure, and hiring scientists, possibly from Pakistan.Pakistan itself, meanwhile, is engulfed in civil unrest aimed at toppling Western-friendly autocrat Pervez Musharraf, which may be an even more frightening prospect than what is happening in Iran. Since Musharraf summarily ousted his...
  • Media Coverage of Muslims Bombs

    According to a Pew Research Center poll released earlier this week, Muslim-Americans are “largely assimilated, happy with their lives, and moderate with respect to many of the issues that have divided Muslims and Westerners around the world.” The poll showed the majority surveyed have close non-Muslim friends, believe in a strong American work ethic and feel there is little conflict between being a devout Muslim and living in a modern society. Overall, an encouraging picture, right?Not according to a cavalcade of major media outlets. On Tuesday and Wednesday, coverage of the poll was downright foreboding. “Supporting Terror?” read the CNN crawl at the bottom of the screen as John Roberts interviewed a group of young moderate Muslims about the poll. On CBS News online, the headline incorrectly stated that 26% OF YOUNG U.S. MUSLIMS OK BOMBS.  And in USA Today, more misinformation and scare tactics: POLL: 1 IN 4 YOUNGER U.S. MUSLIMS SUPPORT SUICIDE BOMBINGS.The fear-inducing reports...
  • Al Unser Jr.: "I Am an Alcoholic."

    On the eve of the Indy 500, two-time winner Al Unser Jr. speaks candidly about his battles with alcohol. And what it's like to see that checkered flag.
  • Q&A: Lanny Davis on Policing Civil Liberties Under Bush

    Lanny Davis is a Washington lawyer best known for his stint as a White House spokesman during the Clinton administration, where he helped do damage control on Whitewater and campaign-finance investigations.  But Davis is also one of the few Democrats to work for the Bush administration—until he resigned last week as a member of the president’s Privacy and Civil Liberties Oversight Board. The five-member board was created by Congress at the recommendation of the 9/11 Commission to monitor potential abuses of civil liberties.  Davis spoke with NEWSWEEK’s Michael Isikoff about his service on the panel, his reasons for resigning—and his dealings with embattled Attorney General Alberto Gonzales. ...
  • Mail Call: Love of God in the Time of War

    Our May 7 cover story on keeping faith while on the battle lines drew a wide-ranging discussion on God's role in war. Many took issue with Army Chaplain Roger Benimoff's claim that he began hating God during his experience in Iraq. "War, like many other tragedies such as poverty and hunger, is an evil that humanity inflicts upon itself and is not God's doing," said one reverend. "God cannot be blamed for our drive to self-destruction." Another reader concurred: "God has not ordained this war, and he has not taken sides. Men have chosen this war." Others expressed their admiration for Benimoff and his colleagues. "I highly respect Roger Benimoff and the other chaplains who are as dedicated as he in serving our men and women in uniform," one said. Another added, "Your story about our military chaplains under fire attests to the fact that there are many unsung heroes in Iraq and Afghanistan."Thank you for the searching and engaging article "Faith Under Fire" (May 7). As a retired...
  • Altruism: Can You Hear Her Scream?

    The ability to recognize subtle signs of fear in a facial expression may facilitate altruism, according to new research in the journal Emotion. In one study, participants identified 24 expressions of fear, sadness, anger, happiness, disgust and surprise. Those better at recognizing fear—but not other expressions—later donated more money and time to help a (fictitious) college student who, they were told, had recently lost her parents in a car accident. In a second study, participants rated the attractiveness of strangers in photographs. Once again, those better at recognizing fear expressions were more considerate of others' feelings: they rated people as more attractive, but only when they were told that the individuals would learn their scores—and could therefore be hurt. "Not everyone is attuned to these cues," says study author Dr. Abigail Marsh of the National Institute of Mental Health. Psychopaths and criminals, for instance, may be less able to recognize fear in other people...
  • NIMBY: No One Wants Gitmo Prisoners

    As Democrats try to shut down the detention facility at Guantánamo Bay, a few GOP congressmen are already gearing for the next battle: ensuring the detainees don't end up in their districts. In the past two weeks, Democrats have introduced identical bills in the House and Senate to close Gitmo within a year and transfer prisoners either to jails in the United States or to their home countries. A memo drafted by the House Armed Services Committee last month and obtained by NEWSWEEK identifies 12 military brigs where space is available to take in some of the suspects. They include the Pensacola Naval Air Station in Florida and the Quantico Marine Corps Base in Virginia. "I absolutely oppose it," says Virginia GOP Rep. Eric Cantor. "I don't think anyone wants terrorists and coldhearted killers in their backyard."The congressmen say the fight is about larger matters: keeping American neighborhoods safe and ensuring that the "unlawful combatants" don't get access to the U.S. justice...
  • Iraq: The Angriest General

    In a startling new TV ad, retired Maj. Gen. John Batiste, once one of the Army's rising stars, takes on his former commander in chief. The ad, produced by votevets.org to persuade wavering House and Senate Republicans to approve a deadline for pulling out of Iraq, begins with a video clip of President Bush at a news conference. "I have always said that I will listen to the commanders on the ground," Bush says. Cut to Batiste, staring at the camera. "Mr. President, you did not listen," he says. "You continue to pursue a failed strategy that is breaking our Army and Marine Corps."Since he first went public with his opposition to former Defense secretary Donald Rumsfeld last spring, "I've had nothing but absolute support" from his colleagues inside the military, Batiste told NEWSWEEK. "No one has objected." He said he had sent his complaints about too few troops and resources in Iraq "up the chain of command." But Raymond DuBois, former top assist-ant to Rumsfeld, says that Batiste,...