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  • White House Supports 'Don't Ask, Don't Tell' Deal

    President Obama has agreed to a compromise between lawmakers and the Defense Department that will help pave the way for the repeal of "don't ask, don't tell," the military's 17-year-old ban on gays and lesbians serving openly in the armed forces.  ...
  • A Green Light to Repeal Don't Ask, Don't Tell

    Gay-rights advocates held two concurrent meetings Monday at the White House and on Capitol Hill to hash out a compromise on repealing Don't Ask, Don't Tell, The Advocate is reporting. ...
  • EPA Wages Battle With BP Over Chemical Dispersants

    Last week, after BP had already dropped thousands of gallons of chemical dispersants onto the oil slick in the Gulf, the Environmental Protection Agency took a second look at the impact of the chemicals on marine life and in wetlands. It's response, in turn, was to politely require the company to transition to a less toxic alternative by the end of the weekend. ...
  • Hard Out Here for a Bennet(t)

    It's a tough year for senators named Bennet(t) from the Rocky Mountain West. First, Republican stalwart Bob Bennett of Utah was ousted by party activists at their state convention; now Democratic Sen. Michael Bennet of Colorado lost at his party's nominating convention to former state House speaker Andrew Romanoff.
  • What Happens When Journalists Lose Their Jobs? You Get Guys Like Rand Paul.

    The Atlantic's Joshua Green offers the best explanation I've seen thus far as to how Rand Paul managed to win the Kentucky Republican senatorial primary, and then promptly started flailing on the national stage. Of course, I'm biased, because Green's explanation is one that asserts the importance of print journalism. He writes:...
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    Quote of the Day: Robin Givhan

    "But Kagan took the anti-style offensive several steps further.... She sat hunched over. She sat with her legs ajar." —Washington Post fashion columnist Robin Givhan on Supreme Court nominee Elena Kagan. The Pulitzer Prize-winner previously created a media firestorm after discussing Hillary Clinton's cleavage in 2007.  
  • Finding New Intel Czar Will Be Tricky for Obama

    By most accounts, National Intelligence Director Dennis Blair was blindsided last week when President Obama agreed to accept his resignation. According to one former senior U.S. official who recently talked to Blair about his tenure in the "Intelligence Czar" post, Blair spoke about his plan to stay in the job until the end of Obama's first presidential term. But Blair also acknowledged that in order to succeed as the nation’s spy supremo, he had to demonstrate that his office had some control, or at least influence, over the CIA and its director, Leon Panetta, who bested Blair in a couple of hard-fought turf fights.
  • Airline Flight Crews Expelled From Gun-in-Cockpit Program

    Approximately 50 airline pilots and other cockpit crew members have been thrown out of a post-9/11 federal program that allowed them to carry loaded guns in flight, according to information provided to Declassified by a Homeland Security spokesperson. The spokesperson did not disclose the specific reasons that the pilots were ejected from the armed-pilot corps, officially called the Federal Flight Deck Officer (FFDO) program, beyond saying they had committed "violations" of the program's "standard operating procedures."...
  • Democrats May Hold House, Not Senate

    Democrats had a very good night on Tuesday, dampening, at least for now, Republican boasts about taking back control of the House. Democrat Mark Critz, a longtime congressional aide, held the Pennsylvania House seat of his former boss, the late and legendary logrolling politician John Murtha, calling into question GOP claims that Republicans would sweep blue-collar swing districts in key states across the country and return the party to power.
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    Why Rand Paul Is Right and Wrong

    You'd expect a man who'd just won his party's primary in Kentucky's race for the U.S. Senate to be beaming. So, why did Rand Paul look like he had been slipped some sour milk when he appeared on the Rachel Maddow show?
  • texas-education-tease

    Texas Cooks the Textbooks

    NEWSWEEK’s guide to the 10 silliest changes that will likely be in the new Texas textbook curriculum.
  • Arizona Mocks Washington With Muppets

    It’s been a long week of criticism in Washington. Criticism, that is, of Arizona’s controversial immigration law. President Obama has taken several high-profile swings at the measure, calling it "misguided" and then “misdirected" this week at a presser with Mexican President Felipe Calderón. That was after Attorney General Eric Holder claimed the statute was not “a good idea” and Homeland Security chief Janet Napolitano called it “a bad law-enforcement law.” ...
  • Rand Paul Fires Back: He's Being 'Trashed Up and Down' by 'Democratic Talking Points'

    Rand Paul is making the rounds of talk shows trying to dial back the media storm over his Civil Rights Act PR fiasco, and even dad Ron Paul has weighed in to defend him, arguing that liberals are jealous of his son’s political future. On Thursday Rand Paul told CNN he would have voted for the 1964 Civil Rights Act, despite earlier saying he had misgivings about extending a ban on discrimination to private businesses. This morning he told George Stephanopoulos that the criticism over his comments were just "Democratic talking points" and “red herrings” by opponents trying to “trash” his campaign. “"When does my honeymoon period start? I had a big victory,” he complained to Stephanopoulos. He's even added another talking point to the media frenzy, criticizing President Obama's handling of the BP oil spill. "What I don't like from the president's administration is this sort of, 'I'll put my boot heel on the throat of BP,' " Paul told Stephanopoulos....
  • MMS: Sorry About That 'Drill, Baby, Drill' Cake

    Humor in the workplace can be fun. But this morning, when The New York Times reported that a reception in Alaska at the regional office of the Minerals Management Service—the agency responsible for regulating offshore drilling—included a cake with the words "Drill, Baby, Drill," not many people were laughing. Feeling the heat, John Goll, the director of MMS's Alaska office, sent around this apology, obtained by NEWSWEEK, to all agency staff: ...
  • Financial Reform—With a Giant Hole

    When is a bill like a doughnut? When it has a huge hole in the center of it, one that is so critical to the success or failure of the bill that it becomes the legislation's defining characteristic. That appears to be the problem with the financial-reform bill that finally cleared "cloture"—closing off debate as it goes to a final vote—Thursday on a 60 to 40 vote that included three Republicans: Susan Collins and Olympia Snowe from Maine, and Massachusetts's newly minted senator, Scott Brown. ...
  • Arne Duncan Dodges Standardized Test Question

    Secretary Arne Duncan went on CNN this morning to promote the Department of Education's newly expanded Teacher Incentive Fund, which will award $437 million in grants to educators who markedly improve student performance. The measuring stick? According to an official DOE press release, the proposed incentive plans must "use fair and transparent evaluations based on multiple measures including student growth." ...
  • Rand Paul Feeds Suspicions About Tea Party Racism

    Try as it might, the Tea Party just can't shake the accusations of racism. As I wrote in an article last month, recent polling seemed to confirm many people's darkest suspicions about the movement—that it was motivated not just by antipathy toward big government but also by racial animus. When confronted with such allegations, Tea Partiers offer a standard response: any evidence of racist sentiment can be chalked up to a tiny minority, and hey, what group doesn't have a freaky fringe? ...
  • What Is With Conservatives, Gays, and Softball?

    In John Stossel's appearance on Fox News, he argues that the part of the Civil Rights Act governing private enterprises should be repealed, allowing businesses to discriminate against anyone they want. Stossel, in the typical reductio ad absurdum fashion of a zealous ideologue, demands to know if we care so much about our namby-pamby commitment to letting black people eat at restaurants, whether we are going to have the courage of our convictions and also make a black student association let in white students, or outlaw discrimination against mustachioed news anchors. ...
  • Rand Paul's Race Comments Roil Kentucky Contest

    Newly minted GOP Senate candidate Rand Paul has already stepped into his first crisis of the campaign, only one day after winning the Kentucky primary. Comments he made about federal civil-rights legislation and segregation during two interviews with national media outlets have earned Paul a barrage of criticism....
  • Rand Paul and D. W. Griffith

    If Americans think of Kentucky at all, they tend not to regard it as part of the Deep South on racial matters: no history of water cannons fired at civil-rights demonstrators; the kind of place that gave the world a proud and defiant Muhammad Ali, not a brutal and racist Bull Connor. ...
  • Rand Paul Comes out Against Repealing the Civil Rights Act

    Kentucky Republican senatorial candidate Rand Paul has issued a statement clarifying his comments on the Civil Rights Act. In it, he says, "I support the Civil Rights Act because I overwhelmingly agree with the intent of the legislation."  ...