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  • Academia: Gallaudet's Bad Grade

    Students at Gallaudet rebelled last year over whether the appointed president was "deaf enough" to lead the nation's premier university for the deaf and hard of hearing. But while debate focused on issues of Deaf culture, the university's foundation was crumbling.Now an academic-certification group has warned the school that its accreditation status is "fragile" and could be revoked. The Middle States Commission on Higher Education's stinging Jan. 13 letter, released last week, cites concerns over eight standards including academic integrity, low graduation rates and a lackluster response to previous inquiries. Accreditation affects major parts of university life, like federal financial aid. "Yes, we have some serious things we need to address," says university spokesperson Mercy Coogan. "But we've been slugging away at it."
  • JetBlue's Contrite Airfare Bargains

    When people are as contrite as the folks at JetBlue, you have to forgive them, right? Especially when they're offering rock-bottom fares, like $39 from D.C. to Boston, $59 from New York to Houston and some money-back guarantees. Professional fliers like Randy Petersen of WebFlyer.com and Tom Parsons of BestFares say there's no reason not to scoop up great deals from JetBlue while the prices are low and the carrier is on its best behavior, following a service meltdown after a Valentine's Day storm. The company said it would repay customers who got stuck and laid down the industry's first "bill of rights" for passengers. It promises to pay for delays with vouchers ranging from $25 to the cost of a round-trip ticket (jetblue.com). The airline has also made moves to avoid any future calamities, promising to notify customers in advance of delays and to keep more planes in the air, getting pilots and crew where they need to be.More to the point, those low fares may not last. Last week the...
  • The Politics of the Brit Drawdown

    In public, British and American officials say the U.K.'s withdrawal of troops from southern Iraq is a sign of success. But that wasn't the private reaction when the Brits first explained their plans last year. Several officials on both sides of the Atlantic (who all declined to be named when discussing the internal debate on security issues) say there was real consternation among Bush's aides about the prospect of a British withdrawal at a time when the president was planning to make the case for a surge of troops. Two senior officials in Washington said the concern was about how the British drawdown would look in PR and political terms inside the Beltway.The two sides have been running on different tracks for several months. As the Brits outlined their plans for withdrawal, in November and December of last year, the details of Bush's surge were far from settled. At the same time, the Baker-Hamilton group was releasing an alternative strategy for Iraq. British officials were far...
  • Alter: The Apology Primary Is On

    Hillary Clinton is right to resist efforts to make her cry uncle and apologize for her 2002 vote in favor of the Iraq-war resolution; that would look weak. Her mistake was in not anticipating this problem with the liberal base of her party last summer and cauterizing the wound in advance, before it festered. Instead, she offered lame rationalizations. She should have taken a leaf from John McCain and her husband, each skilled in the subtle politics of contrition. This skill will be essential to the success of the next president.In recent years, the word apology has reverted in politics to its original meaning in Greek, which is "defense." (Plato's "Apologia" is an account of Socrates' unsuccessful defense of himself in his trial.) Exhibit A is McCain, whose career-enhancing apologies are legion. A partial list includes apologizing for making a "confession" tape during his captivity by the North Vietnamese; for committing adultery during his first marriage; for his role in the...
  • Mail Call: Collision Course for Conflict in Iran?

    Readers of our Feb. 19 cover story drew a line between the Iranian people and the antagonism between their president and George W. Bush. "It is truly frightening that world peace is threatened by Bush and Mahmoud Ahmadinejad, two men who operate in a culture of mutual distrust, arrogance and overheated rhetoric," one said. Some worried that our black-and-white photos showing a black-veiled woman, the Martyrs' Museum and the grave of Imam Khomeini were "fanning the flames," as one put it. "I wish you had used this opportunity to help Americans relate to modern Iranians through our shared experiences, rather than cloaking the entire country in an aura of danger and mystery," another said. Others simply warned darkly of the prospects of another full-scale war. "What's scary is that Iran may be doing the bad stuff Bush claims," one noted, "but he and Dick Cheney have so destroyed our nation's credibility, there's no way to tell anymore."Your cover story detailing the heightened tension...
  • The Checklist

    GO to Ireland. Aer Lingus is offering round trips from New York, Boston or Chicago to Dublin or Shannon for $399, including car rental. Book by Wednesday for specific March departure dates. SEE the moon turn red as it passes completely through the Earth's shadow on Saturday. NASA's advice: face a clear view of the eastern horizon at sunset. For more info, see sunearth.gsfc.nasa.gov/eclipse. SURF foodnetwork.com/robinmiller for the nutritionist and chef's new "Quick Fix Meals" interactive cookbook. These short video and print recipes can be organized into weekly meal planners and shopping lists. READ "Today at the Bluebird Café: A Branchful of Birds," by Deborah Ruddell (Margaret K. McElderry. $15.99). This collection of 22 fun poems and charming illustrations about the lives of birds will send your child's imagination soaring. SHOP myShape.com, a new site that helps women select clothes based on their measurements, body shape and style preferences.
  • Why Can’t Mike Huckabee Catch Fire?

    Mike Huckabee is in an unusual situation for a politician. He doesn’t have to pander to his base. A former Southern Baptist preacher, he starts his 2008 presidential bid well to the right of his party’s most serious contenders. His long-held pro-life, pro-gun, and anti-gay marriage agenda would seem to be music to the ears of conservatives unhappy with the fact that social-issue moderates like John McCain, Rudy Giuliani, and (at least until recently) Mitt Romney are hogging the headlines. So why isn’t the governor of Arkansas and current Republican presidential candidate, stuck around two percent in recent polls, catching fire among religious conservatives? Huckabee has a plan to fix that—and it starts with this interview. NEWSWEEK's Susannah Meadows talked with the other guy from a place called Hope about gays, hell and donuts. ...
  • Uncorked: Brunello di Montalcino

    Brunello di Montalcino, the Sangiovese-based red wine from Tuscany, doesn't come cheap. But you might want to splurge on these intense, distinctive wines that age well. Save up for wines from 2001, a nearly perfect vintage; the top Brunellos, Riservas, are now hitting the market.
  • Law: Court-Ordered Protection for Pets

    The couple had a fight—and the woman returned home to find the body of her gray-and-white kitten, decapitated, in her front yard. (Court papers didn't ID the Bethalto, Ill., woman.) Similar incidents are prompting lawmakers to try to protect animals from abusers. Maine, New York and Vermont have already passed laws, and 11 other states are considering measures that would allow pets and farm animals to be included in orders of protection requested by victims of domestic violence.Few shelters accept animals, so women must often choose between their own safety and that of a beloved pet. Penalties for violating an order can include fines or jail time. Illinois Rep. John Fritchey proposed a bill after learning of vengeful partners who've stabbed puppies or killed horses to intimidate or threaten their exes. "It's often a short line between harm to an animal and harm to a person," he says.
  • 'Star Trek': To Boldly Go ... On?

    Fans of the "Star Trek" franchise love forward-looking stories, but for a while now they've had to live in the past. Trekkers flocked to Christie's auction house this past October, snapping up more than $7 million worth of props and costumes from the show (one model of the starship Enterprise alone fetched nearly $600,000). The Christie's auction highlights the franchise's obsessive fan base and rich mythology. But does "Star Trek" have a future?That question will get an answer in 2008, when the as-yet-untitled 11th "Trek" film is scheduled for release. J. J. Abrams, the man behind such hit television shows as "Lost" and "Alias," is in talks to direct. The film's screenwriters, Alex Kurtzman and Roberto Orci, are not new to reviving iconic franchises. The pair wrote this summer's live-action "Transformers" movie as well as "Mission: Impossible III." Speculation on the film's plot is rampant, and the writers would neither give cast details nor confirm rumors that "Trek" XI will be a...
  • Road Test: Mini Cooper

    When the Mini Cooper folks took me and a few other automotive journalists to a racetrack to test these new second-generation coupes, it had the trappings of a joke. We're talking about a subcompact city car, not a Ferrari, right? But instead of laughing, I whooped it up. Ninety-five miles per hour in a hair over 15 seconds, and 0 to 60 in a respectable 6.7 seconds. Yeah, baby.OK, so I get that BMW, which owns the Mini, tore it up engineering this car to exude performance. This redone four-seater comes in a choice of two engines: a 1.6-liter, four-cylinder, 118hp version, or the S, which is supercharged and makes 172hp. Both have torque pull at any speed, and both get a standard sport button that tightens the shocks for better handling. The new all-aluminum engine significantly reduces weight, helping this Mini to achieve 16 percent better fuel economy.I really liked the electric steering, which took the shimmy out of the steering wheel while traveling over bumpy terrain. But it's...
  • Marketing: Ads That Greet You by Name

    Ads just got personal. Thanks to radio frequency identification (RFID) tags—scannable devices like the ones in an E-ZPass—advertisers can tailor messages to individuals. Last month, Mini USA began erecting billboards in four U.S. cities for a volunteer pilot program. When a Mini Cooper passes, the RFID in the driver's key fob is picked up, and the board displays a personalized message like, "Motor On Jim!" The Texas-based company Media Cart Holdings is set to begin testing its shopping carts—which sense RFIDs on shelves—in a handful of supermarkets. Roll by the milk section, and you may see a silent ad on the cart's digital screen for cookies. The cart will also locate items on your shopping list. "We know basically—to the foot—where these carts are in the store," says Media Cart CEO Steve Carpenter.Any mention of RFIDs raises concerns among privacy advocates, especially proposals to include the devices in ID cards. Mini and Media Cart say prior consent is obtained from all users.
  • Is Hillary Afraid of Being Embarrassed by Bill?

    Last December, a NEWSWEEK reporter tentatively broached a delicate subject with a longstanding adviser to Hillary Clinton: was there a concern in the Hillary camp that her husband might somehow embarrass her in the campaign ahead? The reaction was swift and fierce. "If that's what you want to talk about, I'm hanging up right now," said the adviser, who did not wish to be identified even entertaining such a question.But it is the elephant in the room. Senator Clinton's presidential campaign can ill afford another scandal swirling around her husband, whose second term in the White House was badly disrupted by the Monica Lewinsky affair. Perhaps the Clintonites are understandably worried that the Republican right will try to create a scandal where there is none or dredge up old history. They doubtless anticipate an assault from Clinton's old foes, but they may have been caught unawares by the attack from one of Bill's old friends. In an interview with New York Times columnist Maureen...
  • Conservatism's Fresh Face

    At the annual Conservative Political Action Conference, activists were down—but a long way from out. Meet one of the reasons why.
  • Cleland on the Veterans’ Health-Care Crisis

    The controversy touched off by an investigative series in The Washington Post on the state of the military health-care system is growing. At a congressional hearing Monday, military officials said they were checking conditions at other hospitals—not just Washington’s Walter Reed, where the Post uncovered run-down living conditions for soldiers and mismanagement. Several congressmen also addressed the bureaucracy at the Department of Veterans Affairs, where a Newsweek investigation turned up long waits for veterans seeking medical care and disability payments.Max Cleland, a former Georgia Senator and a Vietnam veteran, has a unique perspective on the health care issue. He was treated at Walter Reed nearly 40 years ago after losing two legs and an arm in a grenade blast in Vietnam. Later, he headed the Department of Veterans Affairs during the Carter administration. In the past two years, Cleland has gone back to Walter Reed for therapy as the Iraq war reignited old traumas from...
  • On Being a First Gentleman

    How would Bill Clinton feel as First Gentleman to President Hillary? Ask the husband of Michigan Gov. Jennifer Granholm.
  • Q&A: Fla. Transsexual Talks About Firing

    Last week, Largo, Fla., city manager Steven Stanton jolted townspeople with the admission that he was a transsexual who was planning to undergo sex-reassignment surgery. Residents flooded city hall with e-mails and phone calls, mostly calling for his ouster. On Tuesday night, the city commission gathered for a tumultuous 3½-hour meeting packed with both supporters and opponents of Stanton. In the end, commissioners voted 5-2 to pass a resolution that initiated the process of firing him. As Stanton, 48, ponders his next move (he has five days to appeal), he spoke with NEWSWEEK's Lynn Waddell. Excerpts: ...
  • Schlesinger on Reagan's Faults and Virtues

    When I was writing a biography of Robert Kennedy in the late '90s, I had lunch with Arthur Schlesinger Jr., the author of the then—and probably still—definitive biography of RFK. Schlesinger, whom I knew slightly, might have brushed me off, but he was gracious and even eager to talk about our mutual subject. Though he was then nearly 80, he knocked back two martinis and tucked into a large steak at New York's Century Club. Then he launched off on cheerful, gossipy tour of the 20th-century horizon, which he had lived as fully as the great leaders he wrote about.Schlesinger was, in some ways, a walking reproach to modern academic historians. He believed in writing from experience, and he argued that individuals—and not just broad social and economic movements—shaped history.Though he won two Pulitzer Prizes and a basket of lesser awards, and though he was regarded at times as the reigning authority on Presidents Andrew Jackson, Franklin D. Roosevelt and John F. Kennedy, he was never a...
  • Terror Watch: The Missing Padilla Video

    The government made a secret video of its interrogations of 'enemy combatant' Jose Padilla. But now that he's on trial, the Feds claim they don't know where it went.
  • Only One Side Of The Story

    By age 14, Somalia-born feminist Ayaan Hirsi Ali had survived genital mutilation at the hands of her grandmother, a fractured skull from her Qur'an teacher and brutal beatings from her devout Muslim mother. By comparison, her father was kind. The Somali rebel, who had largely abandoned his family to plan coups and marry three more women, only meddled when it came to arranging his 23-year-old daughter's marriage. When Ayaan refused, he disowned her.A violent, loveless childhood. The splintering effects of civil war. The pervasive misogyny of her culture. Hirsi Ali's exceptionally harsh life story--told in her new memoir, "Infidel"--would elicit empathy from the coldest of hearts. But that's not the book's only purpose. Hirsi Ali, a 38-year-old Dutch citizen and women's rights advocate who now lives in Washington, D.C., is one of Europe's most infamous critics of Islam. She renounced her Muslim faith after the 9/11 attacks, decried what she regarded as the religion's brutality in...
  • Slave Trade

    Once there was a Christian, a man from a wealthy family. He had conservative values, and he crusaded his whole life for social justice. In the end, he changed history. His name was William Wilberforce, and in 1807 he finally succeeded in abolishing the British slave trade.It is no wonder, then, that a new movie about his life, "Amazing Grace," directed by Michael Apted and opening this week, has its biggest boosters among evangelical Christians. The movie is, by most accounts, problematical entertainment: it's a worthy but lengthy costume drama about parliamentary politics--centered on a Tory most Americans have never heard of. One executive who worked closely on the film calls it "more interesting than good." Its marketing and outreach effort, on the other hand, is inspired. It shows a deep understanding of the new life being breathed into the evangelical community by Bono, Rick Warren and others--people who are making social causes (Africa, poverty, HIV/AIDS) the centerpiece of...
  • Time To Change Tacks On Iran

    Since the 1979 Islamic revolution, the United States has pursued a series of failed policies toward Iran. It has variously sought to topple the regime, threatened military action and proposed strictly limited dialogue--all with an eye toward boxing Tehran in and limiting its influence in the region. This strategy of "containment" continues to dominate U.S. policy.President George W. Bush repeatedly insists that "all options are on the table"--a not-so-subtle reminder that Washington might yet use force to halt Tehran's nuclear program. Yet realistically, the United States has no military option. Iran has dispersed many nuclear facilities and hardened others. Even if U.S. forces could find and destroy those targets--quality intelligence is a serious hurdle--they could be rebuilt relatively quickly. The bottom line: Washington must accept certain distasteful facts--beginning with Iran's ascendance as a regional power and the staying power of its regime. It should open talks with Iran,...
  • A Cheerful Anachronism

    Some rice farmers from congressman Ron Paul's district were in his office the other day, asking for this and that from the federal government. The affable Republican from south Texas listened nicely, then forwarded their requests to the appropriate House committee. It may or may not satisfy their requests in some bill dispensing largesse to agricultural interests. Then Paul will vote against the bill.He believes, with more stubbornness than evidence, that the federal government is a government of strictly enumerated powers, and nowhere in the Constitution's enumeration (Article I, Section 8) can he find any reference to rice. So there. "Farm organizations fight me tooth and nail," he says, "but the farmers are with me." Of course they can afford to indulge their congressman's philosophical eccentricity because lots of other House members represent rice farmers, so rice gets its share of gravy. Still, Paul is a likable eccentric, partly because he likes his constituents while...
  • Hassle And Humiliation

    It was a great idea--a program to build bridges between young Arab modernizers and Americans. The Arab and American Action Forum, launched last September at the Clinton Global Initiative meeting in New York, is an exercise in soft power, bringing together 100 young Arab leaders from all walks of life and introducing them to a similar group of Americans. The goal was to begin a dialogue, build trust and create joint projects for both peoples. The group's Arab organizers are pro-business and pro-American, many with degrees from U.S. colleges and fond memories of their time in America. Aside from Bill Clinton, the forum is backed by the two leading modernizers in the Middle East, Dubai's ruler, Sheikh Mohammed Al Maktoum and Jordan's King Abdullah.As I said, it was a great idea, until these young Arab leaders landed at John F. Kennedy airport. The first group of participants, mostly CEOs of large companies, were pulled out of the regular immigration lines and made to stand for two to...
  • I Did It My Way

    Tony Blair is back where it all began--Myrobella, the house he bought after being elected to Parliament in 1983. It's a ramshackle place, half home, half office, tucked behind a row of old miners' cottages in the north of England. It would be quaint if it weren't for all the police, or if you didn't know President Bush's Marine One chopper once tore up the field next door.He has claim to grander residences, of course--10 Downing Street and the country estate at Chequers. But this is his political home. With Blair on the way out of office, a fin de régime pall suffuses the place these days. It's inescapable even amid the hustle and bustle of his security detail and his traveling staff, weighed down by satchels and carryalls and, poignantly, the scuffed, iconic "red box" in which British government ministers carry their overnight paperwork. Blair has disappeared upstairs to change into jeans. His small downstairs study fills with people waiting to see him: John Burton, his local...
  • Road Test: Maserati Quattroporte

    Gawk at the babe-alicious lines of the redone Quattroporte: smart, sassy, sexy and oh so Italian. Nice job, Maserati. But the exotic marque's latest spruce-up of its popular sedan (made even more seductive thanks to the carmaker's presence on "Desperate Housewives" and "The Sopranos") isn't just showroom pretty.Wearing a new six-speed automatic transmission, the Quattroporte rides smoother than ever and offers nearly seamless shifting. Though you can still buy the DuoSelect transmission, which gives a more serious manual-like shifting feel, this new automatic version appeals to those of us who crave sportiness without the unsettling jerkiness of a manual. The new engine gives the Quattroporte near-perfect weight balance, offering noticeably better road handling, improved braking and zero to 62mph in a snappy 5.6 seconds (with a 168mph top speed). And like any self-respecting high-maintenance beauty, this one demands a choice of wardrobe. How about a selection of five kinds of...
  • Ties Of Blood And History

    The last time the United States and Britain threatened to go to war against each other was in 1895. As European powers raced to expand their empires, Britain coveted a mineral-rich slice of Venezuela along the border of its colony British Guiana. Invoking the Monroe Doctrine, President Grover Cleveland vowed to "resist by every means" British adventuring in the Caribbean. The prospect of taking on Britain thrilled some jingoistic Americans, including Theodore Roosevelt, who was at the time a New York City police commissioner. "Let the fight come if it must," he wrote to his friend Sen. Henry Cabot Lodge. "I don't care whether the seacoast cities are bombarded or not; we would take Canada."Fighting a war with England, whose Navy floated 55 battleships against America's three, because of a border dispute in Venezuela was a preposterous idea. (TR was still going through the Sturm und Drang period of adolescence, explained philosopher William James.) Both governments calmed down when...
  • Perspectives

    "The drug dealer is us."White House drug czar John Walters, on a report showing that prescription-drug abuse among teens is not declining, though teen marijuana use is down"Minnesotans have a right to be skeptical about whether I'm ready for this challenge, and to wonder how seriously I would take the responsibility that I'm asking you to give me."Comedian Al Franken, announcing that he is running for the U.S. Senate in 2008"I'm ready to bear all responsibility for what happened."NASCAR star Michael Waltrip, after his racing team was caught cheating with a banned fuel additive. Waltrip said he considered dropping out of the Daytona 500 preparations over the incident."We're assuming it was male, although they did have a mask on."Sgt. Mark Clark, of the Scottsdale, Ariz., police, on a report of a person dressed as Batman running across a middle-school campus and disappearing into the desert. Some local schools were puton lockdown as a precaution, but "Batman" was not located."It's...
  • The More, The Merrier

    If you think planning a vacation is difficult, try organizing one for a family of 14. That's what Helga Knox, 54, did last year for her husband, George, three of her stepchildren and their spouses and six stepgrandkids. They splurged on an eight-day, small-ship cruise through Alaska's Inside Passage, debarking to hike, raft, kayak and--the trip's highlight--ride a helicopter to stand on Juneau's 7,000-foot Mendenhall Glacier. "It was the perfect trip," says Knox of last July's adventure. "I just get excited about it whenever I think of it."Families like the Knoxes make up one of the fastest-growing segments of the travel industry. In 2003, 38 percent of family vacationers took at least one trip that involved three generations, up from 19 percent in 1999, reports the Travel Industry Association. And travel agents say the number of large family groups going away together is still rising. "Five years ago I didn't do any of this, and now each year we're doing more and more," says Patty...
  • Now Comes The Hard Part

    The ink was barely dry on the nuclear deal signed February 13 by North Korea and the other members of the Six Party Talks before pundits began to blast the agreement. The arrangement--under which North Korea promised to seal and then disable core parts of its nuclear-weapons programs in exchange for energy aid and gradual relief from international sanctions--has been attacked by hawks, including former Bush staffers, as a reward for bad behavior.Former Clinton aides, meanwhile, say it's nothing more than what they negotiated in the 1994 Agreed Framework--which would still be in effect had Bush stuck with the plan. As happens so often these days, the left and the right are converging to attack the president. But while the deal may not be perfect, both sides have got it wrong.To start, the new accord goes way beyond the 1994 agreement, which promised North Korea two light-water nuclear reactors worth more than $5 billion and hundreds of millions of dollars of heavy fuel oil in...
  • And There's More! A Deal That Hard-Liners Hate.

    Hard-liners already loathe the new deal in which Kim Jong Il's regime has agreed to halt activity at its main nuclear plant in return for emergency oil supplies. John Bolton, who recently departed as U.S. envoy to the United Nations, told NEWSWEEK: "We violated the principle that we don't reward bad behavior." Promises to ease North Korea's economic squeeze are among key elements of the deal (struck by the United States and other participants in the Six-Party diplomatic talks). Among the provisions of the agreement are promises by the United States to begin direct talks with North Korea about "moving toward full diplomatic relations," and that Washington will take steps to remove Pyongyang from its official list of state sponsors of terrorism. In return, Pyongyang agreed to "shut down and seal" its main nuke reactor at Yongbyon.But Pyongyang may also get access to controversial bank accounts. Meeting in Beijing three weeks ago, North Korean and U.S. Treasury officials held detailed...
  • Working 9 To 5

    Once, clutches were precious evening accessories, done up in beads and velvet. But come this spring, they're working the day shift. "The big bag has gotten really big," says Sophia Chabbott, accessories editor at WWD. "Women want an option that lets them be more free." Tuck one inside a larger bag, or bring it solo to a weekend lunch date and give your shoulder a much-needed break.
  • Governor Romney, Meet Governor Romney

    There is something a little too good to be true about Mitt Romney. The former governor of Massachusetts and candidate for the Republican presidential nomination is so buff and handsome in late middle age that when a brochure from a recent campaign showed him standing, bare-chested, on a swimming float, he was accused of sexually pandering to women voters. Romney, who is still married to his high-school sweetheart, doesn't drink, doesn't smoke and doesn't swear. His wife has said that, in private, he never even raises his voice.As a candidate, he can appear slightly overproduced, a little too smooth for the hurly-burly of the hustings. Lately, Romney has been courting the evangelical vote, key to winning Republican primaries. He knows that some evangelicals regard his religion, Mormonism, as heresy (according to the National Journal, more than a quarter of self-identified evangelicals tell pollsters that they won't vote for a Mormon). So last week, at a lackluster rally in the Bible...
  • The Dawn Of The Next Cold War

    The 32-minute blast Vladimir Putin delivered at a recent security conference in Munich will go down as a classic. America's "uncontained" militarism, the Russian president declared, has created a world where "no one feels safe anymore," and where other nations feel almost forced to develop nuclear weapons in their own defense. U.S. Defense Secretary Robert Gates tried to laugh it off, joking that "as an old cold warrior" the speech had "almost filled me with nostalgia for a less complex time"--and went on to tout Washington's preference for partnership and good relations.Make no mistake, though. Putin delivered a message, and the White House heard it loud and clear. It goes something like this: in the 1990s, America pushed us around. On NATO expansion, we asked you to consider our national interests. You answered with an advance into former Soviet territory in Eastern Europe. You spoke of energy partnership yet built new pipelines to bypass our territory. Western companies took...
  • A Man Of Mystery

    Robert Novak, as usual, had a scoop to unload--only this time, it was from the witness stand. Testifying last week in the trial of Vice President Dick Cheney's former chief of staff, I. Lewis (Scooter) Libby, the conservative columnist gruffly described how he first learned from two top Bush administration officials that Valerie Plame, wife of Iraq war critic Joseph Wilson, was a CIA officer. But then Novak injected a new name into the drama--one that virtually nobody in the courtroom knew.Asked by one of Libby's lawyers if he had talked about Plame with anybody else before outing her in his column, Novak said he'd discussed her with a lobbyist named Richard Hohlt. Who, the lawyer pressed, is Hohlt? "He's a very good source of mine" whom I talk to "every day," Novak replied. Indeed, Hohlt is such a good source that after Novak finished his column naming Plame, he testified, he did something most journalists rarely do: he gave the lobbyist an advance copy of his column. What Novak...
  • A Bombthrower's Life

    Ayaan Hirsi Ali moved to the United States last September when she was invited to join the American Enterprise Institute, a conservative think tank in Washington, D.C. Last week her controversial memoir, "Infidel," was published here. With armed guards just outside her office, she sat down with NEWSWEEK's Eve Conant to discuss the Muslim extremists who have threatened to kill her, life in America and whether she's a "colonial feminist": ...
  • The Editor's Desk

    She remembered the sound of splashing, then the shot. It was the early 1920s, and my grandmother, then a small girl, was being given a bath by an aunt who had come to stay with the family while my great-grandmother battled what was called "melancholia." As the little girl played in the tub, her mother slipped away to another part of the house, took a pistol and killed herself.I was told the story in the way of warning: depression ran in the family. And as Julie Scelfo writes in our cover this week, men need all the warnings about mental health they can get. As remarkable as it seems in the age of Oprah and Dr. Phil, we remain reluctant to confront the possibility that our irritability, dark moments and even despondency are not random feelings but may be symptoms of clinical depression, and are thus treatable if diagnosed. What William James called "a positive and active anguish" is yielding, slowly but in significant ways, to scientific analysis and medical treatment.For many...
  • The Couples Campaign

    In January 1992, as Bill Clinton's candidacy was foundering amid allegations of infidelity, his wife joined him at a town-hall meeting in New Hampshire. They were on a rescue mission. "We love each other," Hillary Rodham Clinton told the crowd. "We support each other." As for Bill, he sold himself to the onlookers as one half of a political team; Hillary was the reason that he had run. "She woke up one morning and said, 'Bill, we have to do this'." He touted her résumé: Yale Law, successful attorney, years of work on education and children's issues. He had a new campaign slogan, he said: "Buy One, Get One Free." It worked, of course.On her first swing through New Hampshire recently, Hillary and Bill were a team once more--even if he wasn't with her. Republicans fear Team Clinton above all, she said. "I'm the one person they're most afraid of because Bill and I do know how to beat them; we have consistently, and we will do it again."But this time, the Clintons aren't the only legal...
  • The Checklist

    RENT "Babel." This tale of cultural misunderstandings and cruel twists of fate, with Brad Pitt and Cate Blanchett, won a Golden Globe for best drama. But is it Oscar-worthy? See for yourself. FLY first class on American Airlines. The company is offering free upgrades to business-class travelers flying to London from New York City's JFK airport until March 31. READ an Oscar book. Used- and rare-book site Alibris.com is offering deals on such titles as "The Last King of Scotland" (from $7.94), "The Devil Wears Prada" (from $2.95) and "Children of Men"(from $4.27). SEE Jeff Wall at New York's Museum of Modern Art. Featuring about 40 of the conceptual artist's best-known works, including his lightbox photographs. It then moves to Chicago and San Francisco. SURF ticketreserve.com , where you can buy options ($19 to $125) on college basketball's Final Four tickets. If your team makes it that far, your options allow you to buy tickets at face value.
  • Ice Storm Edition

    Global warming is real, but it's hard to get worked up about it if you're shoveling 10 feet of snow or stuck on the runway. Bush (down) Gives a press conference about Iran, Iraq and no one listens. At least the Aflac duck isn't lame. Surge vote (equal) Dem-controlled House says no to Bush buildup. But it's only talk--and lots of it. What comes next? Giuliani (up) "America's Mayor" throws helmet in ring and polls show him beating any Dem. New Yorkers know better. Romney (equal) Could GOP nom really come down to an NYC mayor and a Massachusetts governor? Sounds kind of blue. Anna Nicole (minus) Custody fights for baby and body are nuttier than her life. CW suggests: Bury her with James Brown. JetBlue (minus) TVs in seat backs don't cut it when you're frozen on the tarmac without booze or food for 10 hours.
  • For Chrysler, Dr. Z's Startling Prescription

    Remember those Chrysler commercials, where the mustachioed Dr. Z, with thick German accent, raved that Chrysler's cars have "the best of American and German engineering and design"? Apparently even the doctor couldn't make this transplant work. Last week Dr. Z--a.k.a. DaimlerChrysler chairman Dieter Zetsche--stunned Detroit by putting Chrysler on the block. "All options are on the table," he said, as the German automaker considers what to do with its American problem child. Just last fall, Zetsche insisted Chrysler wasn't going anywhere. But Zetsche said he "revisited" the issue after Chrysler lost $1.5 billion last year as $3 gas drove its SUV sales into the ditch. Now, while Chrysler chief Tom LaSorda attempts a repair job by cutting 13,000 workers and engineering more fuel-efficient models, DaimlerChrysler has hired JPMorgan to shop for suitors. Late last week reports emerged that GM is in talks to buy Chrysler; both companies declined to comment. Other possible buyers: Nissan...
  • The Great Courtship

    When it comes to presidential politics, Richard Land has seen better days. As policy chairman of the Southern Baptist Convention, Land remembers back in 1999 when a Republican presidential hopeful named George W. Bush came calling for support. "He was one of us," Land recalls. Eight years later, things aren't so simple. With Bush sidelined and no heir apparent in sight, voters on the right are surveying the 2008 field with a certain level of despair. The three GOP front runners--Rudy Giuliani, John McCain and Mitt Romney--have all violated conservative principles. Other hopefuls, like Sam Brownback and Mike Huckabee, are beloved by the right but face doubts about their ability to beat a Democrat in the general election. Will social conservatives support the candidate they most agree with--or the one who can win? Land predicts electability, citing fear of a Hillary Clinton White House. "I wouldn't underestimate Clinton's ability to unite social conservatives around a candidate ......
  • Commentary: Left, Right Or Center?

    Tony Blair will leave an enormous political legacy. There can be no doubt about that. Trouble is, it will comprise large debts as well as large assets, and history will have to decide the balance. Blair's putative heir, Gordon Brown, will be at once the principal beneficiary and the man who will have to try to pay off the accumulated debts.First, the positive side: Tony Blair has transformed the Labour Party and, more important, British politics as a whole. When he took the leadership in 1994, Labour had lost four consecutive national elections and had been out of power for nearly a generation. By jettisoning socialism, loosening ties with the unions and presenting Labour as the party of fiscal responsibility, Blair made it electable. More than a decade later, it still is.Blair's transformation of the entire British political landscape has been even more remarkable. Before him, Labour was still a party of the traditional European left: identified with the working classes, wedded to...
  • Injected Into A Growing Controversy

    Texas Gov. Rick Perry caused a firestorm with a recent executive order requiring girls entering the sixth grade to be vaccinated against the sexually transmitted human papillomavirus, or HPV. The FDA-approved vaccine, known as Gardasil, would protect against the two HPV strains responsible for 70 percent of all cervical-cancer cases. Conservative opponents argue that making an inoculation for an STD mandatory may encourage premarital sex and violates parental rights. Even medical organizations such as the American Academy of Pediatrics agree it's too early to mandate a vaccine approved just last June. Renee Jenkins, president-elect of the AAP, says there is a need for more education about the vaccine. But some states may not wait that long. At least 18 others are considering measures similar to Texas's. "It might work out fine," Jenkins says. "But we don't need to walk down this road until we understand what the fallout might be."
  • Meals On The Cheap

    A new survey from the Pew Research Center says that restaurant dining doesn't just hurt your diet, it blows your budget. Consumers are most likely to splurge on eating out and entertainment--and that's where they want to cut back, too. Here's how to save, without ruining your fun. ...
  • What Are You Doing Here?

    Judging by the photos on the walls of his vast office, the new Treasury secretary has a gentler approach to the world than, say, Vice President Dick Cheney. While Cheney likes to hunt small birds with a shotgun, Hank Paulson shoots them with a camera. Photos of unusual birds--Paulson's vacation pictures, taken by his wife--hang above Bloomberg computer terminals feeding the latest Wall Street data to his desk. "If you look around here," he tells NEWSWEEK, gesturing at his photos, "I have spent a huge percentage of my time off in beautiful places, outdoor places, saving the land, wilderness, parks ... Conservation is my passion."Paulson is a rare species inside the Bush administration. Environmentalists see this White House as a bastion of backward thinking; Bush has angered them (and America's allies) by sometimes questioning the science of global warming. Yet Paulson cares deeply about climate change: during his seven-year run as chairman and CEO of Goldman Sachs, the investment...
  • The Cinderella Plant

    Jatropha Circas is the Cinderella of the plant world. Throw a seed in the poorest soil on the planet, and up comes a bush that will likely last 50 years. During a drought, jatropha bushes simply drop their leaves and keep pumping out seedpods. Livestock won't eat it, pests don't appear to like it. For longer than anybody can remember, Africans used it as living fences meant to keep back the encroaching Sahara and Kalahari deserts. It wasn't good for much else.Now this humble bush appears poised to become a global star. In recent years studies have shown that jatropha oil burns with one fifth the carbon emission of fossil fuels, making Africa's hardscrabble ground a potentially fertile source of energy. Scientists estimate that if even a quarter of the continent's arable land were plowed into jatropha plantations, output would surpass 20 million barrels a day. That would be good news for Europe, where the thirst for biodiesel is growing. The European Union has decreed that consumers...
  • A Life In Books: Nathan Englander

    While writing his upcoming novel, "The Ministry of Special Cases," Nathan Englander was wary of picking up any old book because he was afraid of messing up his own voice. Now that he's done, his nightstand is in danger of collapse. ...
  • The Games Gap

    If you can feel the excitement as the International Olympic Committee nears a July vote on the site of the 2014 Winter Games--well, you have a delicate enough touch to win gold in curling. After frenzied bidding for '08 (Beijing) and '12 (London), this race--between Pyeongchang, South Korea; Salzburg, Austria, and Sochi, Russia--is low-profile even by Winter standards. Winter Olympiads are largely a way to put a ski village on the map; the Summer Games can be an image-changing urban-renewal tool. IOC pickers increasingly vote for the Winter site defensively, factoring in whom they favor for the next Summer Games. One aspect that could add urgency: global warming may cut the number of cities cold enough to host. "The Alps may become a dwindling prospect," says Ed Hula, editor of the Around the Rings newsletter.
  • Beijing's New Internationalism

    In many respects Hu Jintao's recent dash through africa--he traveled to eight countries in over a week, signing trade deals, forgiving debt, extending loans and securing rights to natural resources--looked like business as usual for Beijing. For years, China has courted new business partners and tried to gain access to oil and other raw materials around the world while scrupulously avoiding controversial issues such as human rights and good governance. Beijing has long stuck to a strict, 19th-century view of sovereignty, which holds that whatever a government does at home is no one else's business. Its mantra has been reciprocal "noninterference." "We never impose on other countries our values ... and we do not accept other countries imposing their values on us," declared Deputy Foreign Minister Zhai Jun last November.This model has seemed good for business--Chinese trade with Africa skyrocketed from $10.6 billion in 2000 to $40 billion last year (for perspective, U.S.-Africa trade...
  • Global Warming: Get Used To It

    The most inconvenient truth about global warming is that we cannot stop it. Please don't mistake me for a skeptic. I'm fully persuaded by the evidence that climate change is real and serious. Of the 12 hottest years on record, 11 have occurred since 1995. Temperatures have risen by 0.74 degrees Celsius over the past century. (If that seems small, keep in mind that the difference in temperature between the ice age and now is about 5 degrees C.) And human activity appears to be one important cause. The concentration of greenhouse gases in the atmosphere has risen dramatically since the industrial revolution. Methane has doubled and carbon-dioxide levels are up 30 percent since 1750. The projections going forward are highly plausible scientific estimations. The recent report from the Intergovernmental Panel on Climate Change predicts that by 2100, temperatures will have risen by somewhere between 1.1 and 6.4 degrees, and as a result, sea levels will rise by 18 to 59 centimeters. The...