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  • To Catch a Thief at the National Archives

    With its stacks of yellowing historical documents and staff of earnest archivists and librarians, the National Archives doesn’t seem like a typical setting for intrigue. So workers at the Philadelphia branch have understandably been shaken by a whodunit that has unfolded in their normally placid corridors during the last few months.The unusual crime began to unravel last September, when Dean Thomas of Gettysburg, Pa., had the sensation of déjà vu while reading an eBay offer for three Civil War documents from 1861 and 1862 that his brother was bidding on for him. Thomas, who publishes Civil War and American Revolution history books, got up from his desk and looked into one of his many black binders, the one that holds the letters he photocopied some 20 years earlier at the Philly National Archives. There, he found the same ones he was seeing on eBay, being sold by a private seller, “hchapel.” His brother won the bid on a Sunday night and the purchase went through for $298.88. Payment...
  • From Iraq, U.S. Troops Write Home

    In an ongoing series, NEWSWEEK publishes letters and e-mails from fallen U.S. troops in Iraq to loved ones and friends back home. The following are unedited excerpts from correspondence provided by families of the deceased.
  • The Squabble Over Pelosi's Scarf

    Speaker Pelosi's headgear draw fire from both right and left. What it says about Western attitudes toward Islam—and the state of American politics today.
  • Edwards: Balancing Cancer and the Campaign

    John Edwards wanted to talk about predatory lending. Stumping at a convention center in Davenport, Iowa, on Wednesday, the Democratic presidential candidate delivered a wonky speech about home foreclosures and exploitive mortgage terms. But when it came time for questions from the audience, one woman had something else on her mind. She bypassed Edwards and directed her comments at his wife, Elizabeth, who was seated nearby. “Thank you for your courage and inspiration,” the woman said. Praising Elizabeth for battling her recent resurgence of cancer with dignity, she asked what the candidate’s wife might do for the cause of cancer prevention. Elizabeth rose to offer a frank, stirring and self-critical response. “I did not have to be in this situation,” she said. “I did that by my negligence of my own health,” in not getting mammograms when she should have. So she urged the women gathered to “make different decisions” than the ones she had made. The crowd responded with a standing...
  • Mail Call

    Readers of our March 5 cover story on the the United Nations' new chief protested that it was unfair. "You're writing him off before he's even settled in," wrote one. Another said, "Give him a chance, his task is crucial." ...
  • Reality Check on Bush's Rose Garden Talk

    Bush came out swinging against a Democratic Congress determined, he argues, to undo the benefits of the "surge." Time for a reality check. Finding the thorns in Bush's Rose Garden address.
  • Terror Watch: A Fired U.S. Attorney Strikes Back

    The Justice Department called David Iglesias, the U.S. attorney in New Mexico, an 'absentee landlord'—a key reason listed for his firing last December. Just one problem: Iglesias, a captain in the Navy Reserve, was off teaching classes as part of the war on terror. Now Iglesias is striking back, arguing he was improperly dismissed.
  • From Iraq, U.S. Troops Write Home

    In an ongoing series, NEWSWEEK publishes letters and e-mails from fallen U.S. troops in Iraq to loved ones and friends back home. The following are unedited excerpts from correspondence provided by families of the deceased.
  • From Iraq, U.S. Troops Write Home

    In an ongoing series, NEWSWEEK publishes letters and e-mails from fallen U.S. troops in Iraq to loved ones and friends back home. The following are unedited excerpts from correspondence provided by families of the deceased.
  • A Life In Books: Walter Mosley

    All writers lie about their favorite books, says Walter Mosley, author of 28 novels, including "Devil in a Blue Dress." He says the most important books are read before the age of 12, so any list of books read later must be arbitrary. He humored us anyway. An Important Book that you admit you haven't read:Einstein's papers on the theory of relativity. I have it around and I keep trying, but it's hard to understand it. I want to, though.
  • Uncovering the Mysteries of American Marxism

    Once, the FBI would have loved to see this stuff. Actually, they probably did see it, but now everyone will get a look at the files of the Communist Party USA, which the party is donating to the Tamiment Library of New York University. The huge trove of documents, photographs—and membership lists—could settle some big historical questions. Now the truth will out: was Dwight Eisenhower, as the John Birch Society asserted, really a secret communist?Assuredly not—although historian Harvey Klehr of Emory wonders what the files hold about people like Robert Oppenheimer, the nuclear physicist, or the labor leader Harry Bridges, who denied having been party members. Historians would like to understand how American communists coped with the disillusionments of the Nazi-Soviet pact or Stalin's show-trial purges. Many questions were answered when Moscow opened its archives in the 1990s, says journalist Sam Tanenhaus, the biographer of turncoat communist Whittaker Chambers. "But we always come...
  • American Jews: The List—Choosing the Chosen

    Michael Lynton was on a conference call recently when his assistant interrupted: Sen. Chuck Schumer was on the other line. Normally Lynton, who is chairman and CEO of Sony Pictures, would take a call from the senator. But not this time. "We were so in the froth," Lynton says by way of apology; he asked his assistant to take a message.To paraphrase Jewish mothers around the globe: what could be so important? At the moment of Schumer's call, Lynton was on the phone with his friends and fellow power brokers Gary Ginsberg, an executive at News Corp., and Jay Sanderson, CEO of JTN, a Hollywood production company that makes Jewish TV programs. Together, they were putting the finishing touches on their pet project: a list of the 50 most influential rabbis in America. Over the past six months, Lynton, Ginsberg and Sanderson have been refining, revising and rejiggering their list with the kind of mania other men reserve for fantasy baseball. Is the list subjective? Yes. Is it mischievous in...
  • 'Planet Earth': 'Breathtaking' New Series

    Could any TV program sound more boring than an 11-hour nature documentary? Lions. Tigers. Bears. Oh my. But "Planet Earth," the Discovery Channel's breathtaking new wildlife series that globetrots from caves to jungles to deserts to polar ice caps, never feels like homework. It feels more like an action movie that just happens to be on TV, and just happens to feature snow leopards instead of superheroes. Filmed over five years with high-definition cameras, "Planet Earth," which begins airing on March 25, is a reverse trompe l'oeil. It looks so crisp and real that you can't believe it's not fake.The Discovery Channel partnered with the BBC to produce "Planet Earth," spending more than $1 million per episode—a fortune in the nature-doc universe. But every penny is on screen. "Every frame had to be a Rembrandt," says executive producer Alastair Fothergill. To paint on screen like grand masters, Fothergill's intrepid team used innovations like the heligimble—a motion-stabilized camera...
  • Voices of the Fallen 2004: Insurgency

    As 2004 dawned, Saddam was in jail and his sons had been killed. But the initial, heady sense of victory continued to crumble. Iraq's civic and economic order had all but ceased to function—and many Iraqis blamed America. In Sunni-dominated cities and towns like Fallujah, shadowy insurgents mounted increasingly deadly attacks on U.S. forces; some were Saddam loyalists, others simply Iraqi nationalists with some military training, still others, radical Islamists from Syria, Saudi Arabia and elsewhere. In late March, a mob killed and burned four American civilians in Fallujah and dragged their bodies through the streets. The next month U.S. forces would engage in bloody house-to-house fighting not just in Fallujah but in Baghdad and Najaf, where supporters of the previously obscure Shiite cleric Moqtada al-Sadr rose up against the occupation. The carnage and chaos seemed as if it couldn't possibly get worse. But with each passing month, it did.
  • Transcript: Dan Ephron on the Letters From Fallen U.S. Soldiers

    As American forces raced across the desert to Baghdad four years ago, they encountered a far different threat from what they had trained for--mostly scattered militias, often in civilian clothes, attacking strung-out supply lines with AK-47s and car bombs. The pinprick attacks were unsettling. Still, they hardly seemed a threat to the mighty war machine America had assembled. Less than two months after the initial "shock and awe" bombing runs, President Bush would announce from the deck of the USS Abraham Lincoln an end to major combat operations, under a banner declaring MISSION ACCOMPLISHED. If only that were so. Collected by NEWSWEEK over the course of the war, letters from American war dead tell a different, much more complicated story.During an hour-long Live Talk on Wednesday, March 28, NEWSWEEK’s Dan Ephron talked about what we can learn from these missives, and the toll the Iraq war is taking on American families and their resilience, as so many mourn those loved ones they...
  • Voices of the Fallen 2005: Democracy

    By the third year of the war, the white house focused on turning Iraq into a showcase of Middle Eastern democracy. In the first of three elections in 2005, millions of jubilant Iraqis waved their purple-stained fingers for the cameras—a rare triumphal moment. The fact that the vast majority of them were Shiites and Kurds was an ominous sign. As elected politicians wrote a constitution and divvied up ministries, the Sunnis who had not voted were increasingly marginalized. Terrorists like Abu Mussab al-Zarqawi fed off that resentment, launching a horrific series of bombings aimed largely at Shiite civilians in hopes of sparking a civil war....
  • What Breast-Cancer Survivors Can Expect

    Last fall, Elizabeth Edwards was the guest speaker at a conference sponsored by NEWSWEEK and Harvard Medical School. Although she spoke about the sorrows in her life, she conveyed an inspiring optimism. Now she faces another tough fight. To learn more about what Mrs. Edwards and other breast-cancer survivors might expect, Barbara Kantrowitz interviewed Dr. Jo Anne Zujewski of the National Cancer Institute (NCI). ...
  • The Editor's Desk

    The handwriting on this week's cover belongs to Navy Petty Officer 3rd Class Travis L. Youngblood, who was deployed to Iraq in March 2005. The full sentence, from a letter Youngblood wrote his wife, Laura, reads: "I have accepted the fact that any day I'm here could be the day I die"—words that reflect a courageous fatalism about his mission and its possible price. And the day he had contemplated did come, on Thursday, July 21, 2005, when he was killed in action. He was 26 years old.Youngblood is one of more than 100 of America's fallen warriors whose voices we have collected in this Special Issue of NEWSWEEK. Directed by Nisid Hajari and Dan Ephron, the project brings together letters, e-mails and journals; through them we can follow the four years of the Iraq War. We are grateful to the families who shared the correspondence with us (those voices that are not in the magazine can be found in the coming days on NEWSWEEK.com). Arranged as long-form oral history, the package moves...
  • A Sex Scandal at Wal-Mart

    Lawsuits are always written to make the target look guilty. But even by those standards, the countersuit filed last week by Wal-Mart against Julie Roehm is a devastating narrative. It alleges that before being fired in December, Roehm, formerly the retailer's top ad executive, broke company rules by accepting meals and gifts, acted unethically to steer Wal-Mart's $580 million account to an agency with which she'd discussed taking a job—and most sensationally, carried on an affair with a subordinate, Sean Womack. The lawsuit offers what it says are excerpts of their e-mails ("I think about ... little moments like watching your face when you kiss me"), quotes an anonymous co-worker who saw them "pinned against the wall in an intimate pose" at a bar, and alleges that Womack told his wife how many times he and Roehm had sex on business trips.Womack and Roehm have previously denied the charges, but each fell silent last week. Roehm's lawyers decried Wal-Mart's "smear tactic" and said the...
  • Iran: A Sign of Rising Tensions

    The Iranian Navy may be no match for the blue-water fleets of America and Britain, but at a breakfast with reporters last year, Adm. Mike Mullen, the U.S. chief of Naval Operations, was clearly worried about the small boats of Iranian gunmen that operate in the narrow reaches of the Persian Gulf—"their ability," as he put it, "to swarm." Mullen seems to have been prescient. Last week a boarding party of British sailors and Marines was looking for smuggled cars aboard an Indian-flagged merchantman when, suddenly, the Royal Navy's light craft were surrounded by boatloads of armed Iranians. The Iranians whisked the 15 British sailors into captivity. U.S. and British officials, who will not be quoted discussing a delicate diplomatic situation, predicted the sailors would be returned soon, but the incident underscores the rising tensions between Iran and the West.As Iran has pressed ahead with its nuclear program and (in the Bush administration's view) sent covert operators into Iraq to...
  • Making College More Accessible

    Bidding to take control of Capitol Hill last fall, Democratic candidates vowed to make college more accessible--and more affordable--for American families. The pledge excited education reformers, who had largely focused on No Child Left Behind and the needs of the country’s youngest students during the Bush years. Now that the Democrats run both the House and Senate, the wheels are starting to turn. And late last month, Education Secretary Margaret Spellings hosted the administration’s first higher-education summit and called on colleges to be more accountable to consumers. NEWSWEEK’s Pat Wingert talked to Rep. George Miller, Democrat of California, and chairman of the House Education and Labor Committee, about where this momentum comes from and where it may be headed. ...
  • What's Your Food Footprint?

    As if counting calories weren't enough, now you can calculate the "carbon cost" of your food. Starting next month, Bon Appetit, a food-service company that operates corporate and university cafeterias, will test a "low-carbon diet," designed to reduce the greenhouse-gas emissions that cause global warming. Instead of, say, a tilapia fillet (frozen using electricity from a coal-fired power plant and flown in from China on a carbon-dioxide-emitting jet), customers can choose a dish using locally produced ingredients. And forget bottled water. "We want folks to realize that their food choices can have an effect on climate change," says Helene York, director of the Bon Appetit Foundation. Studies show that the production, processing, packaging and transportation of food may contribute up to one third of the greenhouse-gas emissions each year. Bon Appetit's Maisie Greenawalt says, "This is about asking yourself, 'Do I need a banana even if it's flown in from Ecuador, or can I replace it...
  • Tensions High Between White House, Justice

    When dispirited Justice Department officials assembled for a senior staff meeting last Tuesday, Attorney General Alberto Gonzales surprised them. "I just got off the phone with the president," he said, "and he told me he wants me to keep on fighting. And that's what we're going to do." At a news conference later that day, President George W. Bush said he supported Gonzales, defusing expectations that the embattled attorney general was about to resign. But behind the scenes, things remain tense between the White House and Justice over the U.S. attorney mess. A senior White House aide (who asked not to be ID'd talking about personnel matters) told NEWSWEEK that Gonzales still needs to "demonstrate competence and confidence."The crucial test will come next month, when the A.G. is slated to appear before the Senate Judiciary Committee. Democrats plan to hammer Gonzales for his conflicting accounts of the firing of eight U.S. attorneys. "The president isn't saying 'You better perform...
  • From Iraq, U.S. Troops Write Home

    In an ongoing series, NEWSWEEK publishes letters and e-mails from fallen U.S. troops in Iraq to loved ones and friends back home. The following are unedited excerpts from correspondence provided by families of the deceased.
  • From Iraq, U.S. Troops Write Home

    In an ongoing series, NEWSWEEK publishes letters and e-mails from fallen U.S. troops in Iraq to loved ones and friends back home. The following are unedited excerpts from correspondence provided by families of the deceased.
  • From Iraq, U.S. Troops Write Home

    In an ongoing series, NEWSWEEK publishes letters and e-mails from fallen U.S. troops in Iraq to loved ones and friends back home. The following are unedited excerpts from correspondence provided by families of the deceased.
  • TV Preview: How Will 'The Sopranos' End?

    In the opening moments of the April 8 season premiere of “The Sopranos,” a loud knock at the front door startles Tony and Carmela out of sleep. “Is this it?” she asks, with a flash of panic. Well, Carmela, yes and no. No, the FBI agents at her door are not there to drag Tony away for good. (He spends only a night in jail on a minor charge.) But the larger answer really is yes, this is it: HBO’s celebrated drama will finish for good in June after only eight more episodes. It’s clear that David Chase, the mordantly funny creator of “The Sopranos,” is just having a laugh over all the hoopla about how his show will end. But maybe it’s also a hint: if you chose “Tony goes to prison” in your office pool, it looks you’re going to lose. Chase appears to be telling us that a jail cell is way too mild for this guy. If the season premiere is a kind of prologue, there’s a message here about the final hours of “The Sopranos”: this is gonna get ugly.And yet the beauty of the episode (which was...
  • Q&A: Why Soldiers are Deserting the Army

    The number of soldiers deserting the U.S. Army is rising. A defense lawyer discusses what they're saying about leaving their posts-and whether they're likely to find sanctuary in Canada.
  • From Iraq, U.S. Troops Write Home

    In an ongoing series, NEWSWEEK publishes letters and e-mails from fallen U.S. troops in Iraq to loved ones and friends back home. The following are unedited excerpts from correspondence provided by families of the deceased.
  • A Life In Books: Frank Portman

    If the teenage loser/hero of Frank Portman's "King Dork" met Holden Caulfield catching children on that cliff, he'd probably shove him over. Irreverent of everything but rock bands, this debut novel for young adults—very mature young adults—is scathing and true. An Important Book that you admit you haven't read:I have never been able to finish any book by Don DeLillo. A classic that, on rereading, disappointed: The Bible, by God. Starts great; gets bogged down with religious stuff. Terrific ending, though.
  • 'Big Dog': A New Robotic Pack Mule

    All armies need supplies. Will U.S. Special Forces of the future use "Big Dog" to carry theirs?The creation of robotics pioneer Marc Raibert skirts obstacles it "sees," climbs rock-strewn slopes and can jump a three-foot ditch while carrying double a soldier's load—all without human aid. Big Dog is funded by DARPA, the Pentagon agency that explores "the far side" (as it puts it), bringing way-out ideas to reality. Its record includes the Internet and stealth aircraft, so when DARPA's John Main says "biodynotics"—robots inspired by nature—are "potentially revolutionary," he's worth listening to.
  • Talk Transcript: Mary Carmichael on Exercise and the Brain

    A sound mind in a sound body is a short, but full description of a happy state in this world," wrote the British philosopher John Locke. Three hundred years later, research shows that we should begin thinking of body and mind health as conceptually identical. The two are linked at the deepest levels.For several decades we've known about one effect of exercise on the brain, the "endorphin high" that makes us feel good during and right after exercise. Recently, scientists have uncovered some longer-lasting effects of exercise on the brain. Regular exercise improves your mood, decreases anxiety, improves sleep, improves resilience in the face of stress and raises self-esteem. All these benefits don't come because you notice what you've lost around your waist. Rather, they come from exercise-induced alterations inside your head.With exercise, several biological changes occur that make your nerve cells more robust. The blood and energy supply to the brain improves. The genes in nerve...
  • The Checklist

    SEE "Blood Diamond" on DVD. Edward Zwick's slick, hard-hitting political thriller, with Leonardo DiCaprio and Djimon Hounsou, pitches us into a barbaric civil war in Sierra Leone in the 1990s.EAT Green & Black's organic ice cream. This British company, known for its rich chocolate bars, has a new line of delicious, airy ice creams in flavors like choco-late, vanilla and, our favorite, white chocolate with strawberries ($4.49 at Whole Foods stores).HEAR "Armchair Apocrypha," by Andrew Bird. His smart and sparkly indie pop, layered with violin, guitar and glockenspiel, is just the right parts darkness and light. Standout: the head-bobbing "Imitosis."SURF utango.com. Need more incentive to stay married? This new shopping site lets users earn points through purchases and years of marriage. Stay true to your spouse and to uTango for a decade and you could earn $10,000.BUY PlantLove lipstick ($20; sephora.com). It comes in a tube made from corn and a box embedded with flower seeds....
  • Talk Transcript: Mary Carmichael on Exercise and the Brain

    The phone call began ominously. "We've got some very bad news." It was a top official at Pfizer calling for Dr. Steven Nissen, chair of cardiovascular medicine at the Cleveland Clinic and president of the American College of Cardiology, one Saturday evening last December. The official got right to the point. The company was immediately shutting down clinical trials of torcetrapib—the experimental drug that was supposed to slash heart disease by dramatically raising HDL, or "good," cholesterol. In the largest of the four trials, the pill not only failed to reduce deaths, but actually increased mortality by 60 percent. The finding stunned Nissen. "Torcetrapib was expected to be a blockbuster," he says. "People thought the morbidity-and-mortality trial would be stopped early because the benefits were so clear, not because the drug posed hazards."Cardiologists have long hoped for a drug to boost HDL as efficiently and with as few side effects as the statin drugs reduce LDL ("bad"...
  • Health Care: Family Leave Under Fire?

    When President Bill Clinton signed the Family and Medical Leave Act in 1993, workers-rights groups were thrilled. The law allows eligible employees to take up to 12 weeks of unpaid leave for the birth of a child, to cope with a serious illness or to care for a relative without losing their jobs. Supporters say the landmark legislation has already helped more than 50 million families, and they have hopes of expanding the act to make some of that leave paid. But as the clock ticks down on the Bush administration, labor advocates fear there are plans afoot to scale back family leave.A coalition of business groups wants to change the way the Department of Labor interprets the law, claiming the legislation is vulnerable to abuse. "Our employers don't have any problem with employees using the leave for something like chemotherapy treatment or a pregnancy, but you can get it for a cold or migraine headaches," says Jason Straczewski, director of human-resources policy at the National...
  • Gore's Waistline: Clues to Presidential Bid?

    Since the documentary he starred in, "An Inconvenient Truth," won an Academy Award, speculation has only increased about Al Gore's potential entry into the presidential race. He is not taking any overt steps toward running, and that may be the cleverest strategy of all. A Democratic strategist sent Gore a memo sometime ago suggesting he announce, but forgo the traditional campaign trail and continue promoting the cause of global warming. He would be the nonpolitical candidate. Word came back: Gore isn't running. But in fact he is. Whether it results in an official run depends on what the field looks like six months from now. Laurie David, who helped bankroll Gore's film, and whose "personal fantasy" is that he run, says that when she presses him, he's always coy and says his cell phone is breaking up. "I believe him when he says he doesn't have any intention of running," David told NEWSWEEK. "But I also believe the door is not completely shut."As part of his noncampaign, the former...
  • 'Shoes? What Shoes?': Secretive Shopping

    Did you tell your partner about that fabulous pair of Prada pumps you bought last week? If not, you're not alone. In a recent survey by W magazine, 38 percent of female readers admitted to hiding luxury purchases from their significant other on at least one occasion. A similar study by PayPal showed that 82 percent of 3,044 individuals had hidden at least one new item. Alison Burwell, jewelry-news editor at W magazine, says many women (and some men) hide splurges by splitting up the bill among different credit cards, hiding their receipts or paying in cash.Why? To avoid an argument, says Pepper Schwartz, a sociologist at the University of Washington: "They feel entitled to get something, even if it isn't something they have agreed upon." To exercise your spending freedom without guilt, Schwartz suggests couples set aside individual splurge funds to use however they'd like. Or try separate bank accounts. One downside: the thrill of doing something wrong—and getting away with it—will...
  • Public Domain Rights: Artists Who Share

    If mediocre artists borrow, and great artists steal, what kind of artists share? Until recently, mostly unknown ones. But that is starting to change as big-name artists, who don't need to give away their work free of charge, are doing just that. Inspired by the idea that appropriation and influence are inherent to the artistic process, musicians and writers are posting their work on the Web for anyone to borrow or adapt. Many of these artists make their work available via licenses from Creativecommons.org, which lets artists give away limited or total access to their work, instead of the standard "all rights reserved." Since its inception in 2002, the nonprofit organization has issued an estimated 150 million licenses.Playwright Charles Mee, author of "bobrauschenbergamerica," instructs writers to "pillage" the structure and contents of his plays as resources for their own work on a section of his Web site he calls "the (re)making project." And science-fiction writer Cory Doctorow...
  • How to Buy a House With Bad Credit

    Regina Miller says she is tired of "throwing away $1,520 each month" to rent the two-bedroom apartment in Long Beach, Calif., that she shares with her 12-year-old son. So two years ago she set some goals, including making more money and buying a condo.She's accomplished the first goal, supplementing her modest hourly wage managing a local gift shop with money she earns selling cosmetics part time. But at least for the foreseeable future, a house may be out of the question. "I thought for sure I could buy something," says Miller, who says her credit rating hovers around 580. "Everyone was getting loans. People with worse credit than me, even."But the once booming housing market is now foundering in many cities, largely because buyers with shaky credit scores like Miller's have been defaulting on their mortgages in record numbers. That means the roughly 13 percent of Americans whose credit score is between 500 and 599 (read: not so good) and who not long ago might have qualified for a...
  • Road Test: Shelby GT500

    A simple way to bulk up muscle without stepping foot in the gym: buy this Shelby GT500. Sinewy and forceful, like a body-builder doing reps on Venice Beach, these wheels are pure showy American beefcake. That 500 on the nameplate stands for ponies, and I motored through each and every glorious one of them. Actually, it was more like navigating a stampede, owing to the 5.4-liter, V-8 sport-tuned engine. Crazy wheel-spinning, gas-sucking power. I can't help but wonder why anyone needs such amplified rear-wheel-drive torque to take the kids to basketball practice, and yet, wow.I craved this delicious ride but had issues with Ford's somewhat shoddy interior. Yes, there's a well-done Euro-inspired stitched-leather dashboard and baseball-stitched leather steering wheel. But I was disheartened by the overuse of cheapo plastics on the audio/climate controls and on the center console and door panels. I liked the firm seats, which are bolstered to brace for that inevitable raucous ride. And...
  • Homeland Security: Too Many Warnings?

    The warning arrived late last week. Yet another alarming bulletin about terrorists. This time, schoolbuses were said to be threatened. State and city law-enforcement groups were told that foreigners with possible ties to "extremist groups" had recently bought schoolbuses and applied for relevant licenses. But counterterrorism officials at the FBI, which had issued the warning along with the Department of Homeland Security, insist they know of no recent intelligence indicating that terrorist suspects are trying to get jobs as schoolbus drivers. Officials contacted by NEWSWEEK said they were unaware of any specific current intelligence reports about extremists infiltrating the schoolbus industry. "This intelligence bulletin was not based on specific suspicious activity," said Richard Kolko, an FBI spokesman. He added: "There is no threat. There is no plot. Parents and children have no reason to worry." A second counterterrorism official who follows daily intelligence reporting on U.S....