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  • Pakistan: America’s Dubious Ally in Terror War

    Pervez Musharraf has always been a dubious ally in George W. Bush's War on Terror—the kind of guy you avert your eyes from while patting him on the back. It's not that Bush doubts the Pakistani leader's sincerity—"He shares the same concern about radicals and extremists as I do and as the American people do," the president said at an Aug. 9 news conference—it's just that Musharraf is never going to make it into Bush's democracy club. And Musharraf's ability to stop his nation's Islamist radicalism from spilling over into terrorism has always been limited. A genial autocrat who seized power in a 1999 coup and has refused to relinquish his general's uniform, Musharraf has succeeded in keeping Washington on his side by regularly handing over second-tier Qaeda suspects and by keeping tenuous control over his increasingly Islamicized country. But now Musharraf may be losing his grip on power amid rising concerns by senior U.S. officials that a new safe haven for Al Qaeda has emerged in...
  • Dickey: How Homegrown Terrorists Are Made

    The real threat to the West is not from foreign jihadis but from 'unremarkable' civilians within our societies, says an insightful new report from the New York Police Department.
  • Mme. Sarkozy Shines As First Lady

    France's scene-stealing new First Lady made a spectacular foray into geopolitics last month with her controversial role in the liberation of five Bulgarian nurses and a Palestinian doctor from a Libyan prison. Her actual influence in ending the eight-year ordeal remains ambiguous: "She was lucky," Saif al-Islam Qadhafi, the Libyan leader's son, told NEWSWEEK. Lucky or not, after two trips to Libya and a long conversation with the man who was once the most roguish of state leaders in his Bedouin tent, the mythmaking had begun....
  • Walter Veltroni: The Italian Bill Clinton

    In six years as mayor of Rome, Walter Veltroni has calmed a notoriously fractious city built upon a 2,500-year-old infrastructure and centuries of ineffective management. He kept the budget in line, increased tourism and, after nearly a decade of stagnation, revved up the local economy, which has grown 6.1 percent since he took office, compared with 1.4 percent nationally. The mayor even brought back the kind of glitterati Rome has not seen since the days of La Dolce Vita in the 1950s, staging a 45th-anniversary party for the designer Valentino that actress Sarah Jessica Parker dubbed "the most glamorous fashion show of all time."Now Veltroni, 52, hopes to bring his touch to the prime minister's office. In late June, he called for an end to the "angry conflicts and poison" of Italian politics, announcing to raucous applause his candidacy to lead the center-left's new Democratic Party, a fusion of the two largest parties in the ruling coalition government. The party primary is in...
  • Dan Gross: Lessons From Motown

    A world-beating made-in-the-U.S.A. industry, long insulated from foreign competition, dominates global markets and cheerily doles out stratospheric wages and benefits. As it begins to lose market share, executives write off international competition as a low-quality nuisance. When the foreign ripple becomes a wave, corporate chieftains look to the government for help and blame regulations and plaintiffs' lawyers for their woes, rather than confront their own untenable cost structure.Detroit and the auto industry, circa 1985? Yes. But it also sounds an awful lot like New York and Wall Street, circa 2007.Wall Street's loss of global market share in initial public offerings has reached a crisis level. In 2005, 24 of the globe's 25 largest IPOs took place overseas. So did nine of the 10 largest of the class of 2006, including the record $20.6 billion IPO of Industrial & Commercial Bank of China, which was staged in Hong Kong. Last month, DLF, the Indian real-estate company, held a ...
  • Liu: China’s Fight to Spin the ’08 Olympics

    Architects in China have rarely had to worry about a lack of work; a few years ago, according to a report by Rem Koolhaas and his students at Harvard, China already had "one tenth the number of architects as in the U.S. designing five times the volume of projects." But the work tends to be grim; most designers toil in government institutes, churning out blueprints for one soulless high-rise after another. Yet amid the mediocrity a surprising new climate for sophisticated architecture is developing, most visible in the cutting-edge commissions for the 2008 Olympics. Those projects, spearheaded mainly by star foreign firms, have helped inspire a design counterculture within China, as more young architects open their own studios and revel in experimentation. "Challenging tradition may be China's tradition," says 31-year-old architect Ma Yansong.While Shanghai is known as the city of sparkling towers, Beijing has become the epicenter of innovative design. Officials have given enormous...
  • Social Networking And Class Warfare

    For young people, the burning question of our time is "Facebook or MySpace?"Though there's considerable overlap between the two big social-networking services, only one usually becomes the center of a teen's online social life. Most often the choice is made depending on where your friends are. But what determines whether clusters of friends alight on MySpace or Facebook? A controversial answer comes from Berkeley researcher Danah Boyd: it's a matter of social class.A few weeks ago, Boyd—who has done extensive ethnographic work on online behavior, posted an essay sharing her (admittedly nonscientific) findings after months of interviews, field observations and profile analysis. Generally, she contended, "The goody-two-shoes, jocks, athletes and other 'good' kids are now going to Facebook. These kids tend to come from families who emphasize education and going to college." MySpace is still home for "kids whose parents didn't go to college, who are expected to get a job when they...
  • Economics: Helping Poor Countries Strategize

    GDP is the standard yardstick for evaluating a country's economy, but it's a rough measure, especially for poor countries—it doesn't take into account the types of products a country makes and how they affect growth prospects.Using network mathematics, economists at Harvard and the University of Notre Dame came up with a map that connects countries according to exports. The map, say the authors, is a step toward measuring how much poor countries must change to compete with rich ones. It reveals two hubs—Europe's and North America's high-tech products, and East Asia's textile and electronics industries.An apple exporter can move into oranges, but cell phones require capital and a structural overhaul. By making global patterns evident, the mapping technique may help developing countries strategize.
  • The Last Word: Saif al-Islam al-Qadhafi

    Saif al-Islam al-Qadhafi (his preferred spelling of a name with many variations in English) is the best-known son of Muammar Kaddafi, the Libyan ruler once called "the most dangerous man in the world." Lately, Kaddafi has emerged as a newfound friend of the west, renouncing terror, giving up weapons of mass destruction, and opening Libya for business. Qadhafi, 35, has no official post in government, yet has played a key role in building Libya's ties to the West. Last week he spoke to NEWSWEEK's Christopher Dickey about that role and the recent deal to free five Bulgarian nurses and a Palestinian intern who had been accused of spreading HIV to children in a Libyan hospital. In return for their freedom, Libya got millions of dollars and a nuclear cooperation deal. Excerpts: ...
  • Weird Stuff That Could Save the World

    God, as the hymn goes, may have made all things bright and beautiful, but for sheer weirdness first prize should go to a man-made creation instead: aerogel. A solid that's up to 99 percent gas, it is rigid to a light touch, soft to a stronger one, and shatters like glass if it's put under too much pressure too quickly; it's one of the most enigmatic of materials, as well as one of the most versatile.It can withstand the heat of a direct flame; engineers use it for insulation on oil rigs and for warmth in the insoles of hiking boots worn in the coldest temperatures on Earth. NASA uses it to trap comet dust blowing through the universe at six kilometers per second. It even works as casual, sporty jewelry—AeroGem sells a key chain with an aerogel bob on the end, and a pendant "hermetically sealed inside silver-over-titanium end caps for added strength and long-lasting, waterproof durability."The most recent headlines about aerogels, however, don't have anything to do with oil rigs or...
  • Liu: China’s Fight to Spin the ’08 Olympics

    The transformation of Beijing for the 2008 Olympics is emerging as perhaps the most ambitious remake of any major world capital in history, short of the postwar reconstructions. The silhouettes of the spectacular new stadium and swimming center are already familiar worldwide, but they are set in a rebuilt urban core that startles return visitors. Lush new green spaces, swirling expressways, shopping arcades roofed with giant LED screens, a new downtown financial center plus a vastly expanded public transport system have all rapidly appeared. To some, the Olympic-driven metamorphosis evokes the remaking of Paris by Baron Haussmann between 1865 and 1887—a complete redesign of the city center, including the creation of the grand boulevards for which Paris is famous today.For others, Beijing's radical rebuild smacks of totalitarian-power architecture, akin to the grandiose but unrealized blueprints of Albert Speer, Hitler's favorite architect. But Albert Speer Jr. disagrees. The younger...
  • What's Next For Japan's Opposition

    To understand Ichiro Ozawa—whose Democratic Party of Japan thumped Prime Minister Shinzo Abe's Liberal Democratic Party in upper-house elections last week—it helps to consider where he kicked off his campaign: in Shinjoson, a small farming community of just over 1,100 nestled away in mountainous western Japan. Ozawa's message, which he declared that day and then trumpeted ceaselessly during the following weeks, was clear: only his party cares about the nation's forgotten countryside. "We will rebuild rural Japan, home to us Japanese," he promised. "That's where everything begins."The strategy worked, delivering 60 percent of rural voters (or 17 of 29 rural seats) to the DPJ in the poll and handing the LDP its worse loss ever (it won only six seats). Now the 65-year-old Ozawa—an LDP veteran himself who quit the ruling party 14 years ago to help form the Japan Renewal Party (now part of the DPJ) —has a shot at putting his campaign talk into action: first through control of the upper...
  • 'A Double-Edged Sword'

    Benazir Bhutto, the exiled, two-time Pakistani prime minister, is now negotiating a political comeback with President Pervez Musharraf. Last week they reportedly met face to face in Abu Dhabi after months of back-channel talks. The two need each other. Bhutto wants to return to Pakistan to run in next year's elections—without having to face the corruption charges that drove her into exile. She also needs a repeal of the two-term limit for elected prime ministers. Musharraf, meanwhile, is grasping at straws: last month the Supreme Court overturned his suspension of the chief justice; his approval rating is an anemic 34 percent, and Islamic militants have launched a spate of attacks against his security forces, including two suicide bombings in Islamabad. He thus needs the support of Bhutto and her Pakistan People's Party—arguably the most popular political force in the country—if he hopes to be re-elected president. From her London home, Bhutto, 54, discussed Pakistan's political...
  • Mail Call: America After Bush

    Many readers of our June 11 "After Bush" cover story cheered Fareed Zakaria. "A first-rate analysis," praised one. "A refreshing appraisal," said another. Some offered their own views on America's post-Bush problems. One faulted Zakaria for his "position on the war in Iraq." ...
  • Getting Israelis, Palestinians on the Same Page

    Sami Adwan is the very model of a soft-spoken professor. He measures his words, and listens carefully to what others have to say. Yet while pursuing an education Ph.D. at the University of San Francisco in the 1980s, Adwan not only refused to listen to Jewish students, he says he dropped out of classes if he knew they included Jews. A Palestinian born in the village of Surif, near Hebron, Adwan had grown up under the shadow of the Israeli occupation, hearing tales from his father and grandfather of how Jews had seized the family's orange groves and wheat fields in 1948. Returning to his homeland with his degree, Adwan joined the then outlawed Fatah Party and was thrown into an Israeli jail in 1993.That was his real education. While awaiting charges, Adwan overheard two Israeli soldiers arguing over whether he should be made to sign a document in Hebrew that he couldn't read. Shocked to hear one of his enemies defending his rights, Adwan decided that he had some things to learn about...
  • Wall Street Hot on Weapons Makers

    It may be too soon to talk about a global arms race, but the shopping spree is on. Nations of the world are buying weapons at the fastest pace since the Soviet Union collapsed 16 years ago. In 2005, according to the latest U.S. government data, the value of signed weapons agreements reached $44.2 billion, up more than 43 percent since 2001 and more than at any time since the cold war ended in 1991, when the figure hovered in the $50 billion range. The global arms bazaar got even busier in late July, when the Bush administration announced it would offer some $20 billion in new weaponry for its Gulf allies, with the lion's share for Saudi Arabia. Largely unnoticed was that Riyadh, its eyes cast warily on rival Iran, already has $28 billion in arms purchases in the pipeline from European suppliers.The implications are as big as the deals. While the U.S. spends more money on new weapons than all other nations combined, it is no longer doing so at the brisk pace it was in the first few...
  • Investing in North Korea

    Emerging markets have taken a hit over the past couple of weeks, as global market wobbles have prompted a flight from risk. So it's surprising that North Korea—a country that stretches the very definition of emerging market—has been in the news as a target for foreign investment. For example, Egyptian conglomerate Orascom recently spent $115 million to buy a 50 percent stake in a North Korean cement company. The Egyptians are by no means the only ones piling into Pyongyang these days. Since North Korean dictator Kim Jong Il began a program of pseudo-reforms in July 2002, outside investment has increased from places as diverse as Britain, Germany, South Korea and China. Pyongyang's announcement a few weeks ago that it had shut down North Korea's sole nuclear plant in order to comply with an aid-for-weapons deal has only increased the buzz among investors, who view the country—so far off the standard investment grid—as beyond the usual emerging-market dynamics. While dicey accounting...
  • Water Shortages: Investment Opportunities?

    The new oil may be water. According to Global Water Intelligence, a U.K. consultancy, by December total assets under management in water funds could hit a record $20 billion this year, a 53 percent increase from 12 months earlier. No wonder: since 2001, shares in glob-al water companies have gone up 150 percent, according to Thomson Financial. That compares with a 50 percent rise in international blue chips.The reason is simple: there is profit in scarcity. Buffeted by constant news of dying rivers, droughts and water shortages from China to Mexico, investors are increasingly aware that water is a threatened resource. With more and more governments handing public water systems over to the big multinationals like the U.K.'s Veolia Environnement and Thames Water, profits are rising. One of the top companies, France's Suez, saw global sales from its water unit increase 11.7 percent, helped by a 20.3 percent rise in revenue from China. These days, savvy asset-management companies have...
  • Artists Respond to Rapidly Changing Singapore

    All cities change, but Singapore seems to change a little faster than most. From small fishing village to colonial outpost to cosmopolitan metropolis, the city-state keeps reinventing itself, sometimes at neck-breaking speed. Skyscrapers, expressways, concrete and glass are now icons of a highly urbanized city whose seemingly insatiable craving for new buildings shows no sign of abating.How artists respond to such a rapidly changing environment is at the heart of several new exhibitions in town. They form part of the Singapore Art Show, a two-month visual-arts event involving more than 300 Singaporean or Singapore-based artists showcasing their work in 47 venues, ranging from museums and art galleries to shopping malls and nature reserves. Established to promote local work, the event does not have an overarching theme. But perhaps unsurprisingly in a city obsessed with making its mark on the region, Singapore itself is at the heart of many of the exhibitions. "Every city in Asia is...
  • Level Up

    My first Xbox 360 died just two weeks after I received it as a wedding-anniversary gift last summer. One minute it was humming along as I parachuted into position on Bridge Too Far in Battlefield 2: Modern Combat, the next it froze up and stared me down with the dreaded "ring of death" error light. I exchanged it for another unit and wrote off the failure as bad luck. Truth be told, the Xbox consoles are the first Microsoft products I've truly loved (my household computers are all Apples). It felt like Redmond had gotten it right: solid, if chunky, industrial design; smooth and bug-free operating system; genre-defining games like Halo and Xbox Live—the lifeblood of my nightly gaming. More recently, news of Xbox manufacturing problems has given me pause. I now look at my Xbox and wonder when, not if, it will die. It's funny: I know that my iPod, which cost as much as an Xbox, is nearing its end, but I'm not nearly as upset at the thought of it tanking. When my second Xbox goes, my...
  • Mail Call: A Long, Sad Goodbye

    Readers of our June 18 report on caregiving for Alzheimer's patients offered unstinting praise. Cheered one, "Wonderful, much needed articles!" Added another, "Your story is the best conversation starter." The rest shared their experiences of caring for an afflicted loved one. ...
  • Samuelson: Paying for Aging Baby Boomers

    If you haven't noticed, the major presidential candidates—Republican and Democratic—are dodging one of the thorniest problems they'd face if elected: the huge budget costs of aging baby boomers. In last week's CNN/YouTube debate, New Mexico Gov. Bill Richardson cleverly deflected the issue. "The best solution," he said, "is a bipartisan effort to fix it." Brilliant. There's already a bipartisan consensus: do nothing. No one plugs cutting retirement benefits or raising taxes, the obvious choices.End of story? Not exactly. There's also a less-noticed cause for the neglect. Washington's vaunted think tanks—citadels for public intellectuals both liberal and conservative—have tiptoed around the problem. Ideally, think tanks expand the public conversation by saying things too controversial for politicians to say on their own. Here, they've abdicated that role.The aging of America is not just a population change or, as a budget problem, an accounting exercise. It involves a profound...
  • U.S. Soldier’s Guide to Iraq—Circa 1943

    In 1943, U.S. servicemen stationed in Iraq were issued a pocket-size 41-page book entitled “A Short Guide to Iraq.” In straightforward prose, the book gave American soldiers a primer to help them through the cultural snarls and byways of the country in which they were stationed. They learned a little history, a little geography and a smattering of vocabulary and grammar.In light of what we know about Iraq and the Middle East today, the book’s contents look a little slight. But when you reflect on what Americans knew about a then-obscure corner of the world in 1943, it looks like a godsend. Back then there was no television to beam a country’s culture into living rooms around the world. You couldn’t Google “Iraq” and learn basic history and culture on the fly. “A Short Guide to Iraq”—recently republished by the University of Chicago Press as “Instructions for American Servicemen in Iraq During World War II”—filled a big gap in the knowledge of American troops in Iraq, and its overall...
  • Iraqi Prison Tries to Un-Brainwash Radical Youth

    Wiry and lean, Abdullah looks on with a glassy stare as the instructor explains the subject for the day: revenge. The case study is the first gulf war, and the instructor lists religious and moral reasons why it was wrong for Iraqi soldiers to loot and kill in Kuwait. Abdullah, 17, and the nine other teenagers sitting with him on wooden benches in the class nod impassively. This isn't an ordinary high school. The teens, all decked out in orange uniforms, are detainees at Camp Cropper, the high-security facility in Iraq that once held Saddam Hussein.Some of the teens may have tried to kill American or Iraqi soldiers, others may have been picked up for smaller offenses like breaking curfew. But the group, all Sunnis, have one thing in common: they've all been brainwashed for jihad. "They get their education from Wahhabis," says Sheik Abdul Jabbar, 37, an Iraqi cleric working with the teens, as he looks on from the side of the class. "They say their enemy is the Shia first and then the...
  • Iraq: On the Ground With an Anti-IED Unit

    Most American soldiers in Iraq want to avoid roadside bombs. Ted Seitz isn’t one of them. The powerfully built Navy chief petty officer spends his days and nights deliberately searching for improvised explosive devices, better known by the infamous acronym IEDs, along desert roads and highways in northern Iraq. It’s tough, tiring and dangerous work, and it takes a particular nasty toll: three fellow explosive ordnance technicians died in separate incidents last month. Seitz, an Arizona native, had been a training instructor for two of the dead. “It sucks,” he told NEWSWEEK. “It reminds the guys that this is for real.”The men and women of Seitz’s battalion, the Explosive Ordnance Disposal Mobile Unit 2, based out of Little Creek, Va., probably don’t need that reminder. They’ve lived and worked seven days a week for months on end to rid northern Iraq of the weapon that is the biggest threat to U.S. troops. Several members of their battalion (officers won’t say exactly how many) have...
  • China’s Fight to Spin the ’08 Olympics

    Beijing hopes to use the 2008 Olympics to showcase its political and economic gains. But one year before the Olympics, journalists are far from free--and China and its critics are locked in a competition of ideas.
  • Ghandi: Father of a Troubled Son

    Mohandas Gandhi's son Harilal lies drunk and destitute on a dirty Mumbai street. A couple of passersby find him and cart him off to a nearby hospital. There a doctor prods him to name a family member they can contact. But Harilal can barely remember his own name. Eventually he whispers: "Gandhi." Impatiently, the doctor tells Harilal that Gandhi is father to the whole Indian nation. "What is your father's name?" he asks.The poignant scene dramatizes the central tension in the new film "Gandhi, My Father," a gripping account of the stormy relationship between one of the world's greatest political icons and his rebellious eldest son. Based on the biography "Harilal: A Life," by the Gujarati scholar Chandulal Dalal, "Gandhi, My Father"—shot in Hindi and English—sheds light on the human side of the mahatma, whose nonviolent resistance to British rule helped win India its independence in 1947. First-time film director Feroze Abbas Khan and Bollywood star turned producer Anil Kapoor blend...
  • Q&A: Amory Lovins On Living Green

    Amory Lovins was a green guru long before it was fashionable—he’s been holding forth on energy efficiency and alternative power from his Rocky Mountain Institute for decades. His 380-square-meter home (about 4,000 square feet), nestled in Snowmass Creek Valley, Colo., doubles as RMI’s headquarters. It is a model of energy efficiency. A sun-filled indoor greenhouse acts as the home’s furnace, generating heat that can be stored and used months later. Appliances were selected for their efficiency, like the refrigerator that uses 8 percent of the energy of a conventional fridge. There’s even a draftproof doggy door. Take a tour below.
  • Jaycee Chan (Jackie's Son) Finds His Rhythm

    Jaycee Chan was filled with apprehension. He was in a hotel room trying to film a love scene for his new movie, "The Drummer," and it wasn't going smoothly. "'Wah, with 50 people staring, how can I do the job right?' " he recalls thinking. He had already banished his famous father, Jackie, from the set; the action star was passing the time in the bar downstairs, singing karaoke. Eventually the younger Chan found his groove and aced the scene. "At first there was a lot of pressure," he says. "Now I don't care." But audiences will: Chan, 24, gives a mesmerizing performance in "The Drummer," in which he plays a crime boss's troubled son who is transformed by Zen drumming. "I think Jaycee is going to be a very, very good actor," says Hong Kong upstart Kenneth Bi, the film's director and writer. "He's got stuff going on."That's putting it mildly. This summer Chan stars in no fewer than three major Asian films. In addition to the independent "The Drummer"— scheduled to premiere at...
  • Buying Culture From the West

    Tough negotiations are nothing new to Jean d'Haussonville. The special adviser to France's Foreign Ministry has represented Paris in major negotiations with both the EU and NATO in recent years. But nothing prepared him for the high-stakes deal he struggled to hammer out over the past year and a half: an unprecedented agreement to open a branch of the Louvre in Abu Dhabi, the tiny capital of the United Arab Emirates. Persuading his compatriots to part with a portion of their cultural heritage was no easy matter; founded by Napoleon in the 18th century, the home of the Venus de Milo and the Mona Lisa had never before established a presence outside France. And there was plenty of resistance to opening the first foreign outpost in a country that had gone from barren desert to glitzy shopping haven in the space of 30 years. The general feeling, as Sorbonne president Jean-Robert Pitte summed it up, was, "Can we really bring culture to camel riders and carpet sellers?"Abu Dhabi, led by...
  • Global Investor: The Japan Syndrome

    Is Japan slipping back into global irrelevance? Frustrated investors may well be asking themselves that question after the Tokyo market's unimpressive performance of the past 18 months. In a period when most other Asian markets have blown the doors off, with returns ranging from 20 percent for military-ruled Thailand to an eye-popping 270 percent for the Shanghai market, the Nikkei index has risen a tame 9 percent. Since the yen is one of the few currencies to have fallen against the U.S. dollar—the other notable example being Zimbabwe's currency—returns to foreign investors have been flat at best.It gets worse. Over the past several weeks, a series of court rulings and shareholder votes have gone against foreign activist investors who had been pressing managements to improve. And Japan certainly needs activists. Currently, less than one fifth of profits are paid out to shareholders. One recent request for an electric power utility to hike its dividend for the first time this...
  • The Pitfalls of Buying Culture

    The relatively unknown emirate of Sharjah, an hour’s drive from Dubai, provides a cautionary tale for those hoping to “buy culture.” The Emir of Sharjah, Sheikh Dr. Sultan ibn Muhammad al-Qasimi, himself an established art collector, decided in the early ‘90s that the best way to differentiate his neighbors in the United Arab Emirates was by making a massive capitol investment in cultural institutions. “Sharjah was the first city in the U.A.E. to focus on the arts,” says Marwan Al-Sarkal, the CEO of the Qanat Al-Qasbah cultural district in Sharjah. “We started before anybody even thought about culture as a priority.” The dozens of museums and art galleries he constructed earned the city the designation of “cultural capital of the Arab world” by UNESCO in 1998.But a city needs more than money to become a true cultural capital. The quality and sustainability of the museums have fallen victim to the breakneck speed with which these museums were developed. Most of the museums are...
  • Britain's Post-Blair Identity Crisis

    Once upon a time, cricket seemed the most British of sports. Leisurely games on the village green. Rain breaks. Warm beer. White men (for the most part) in fussy white uniforms. Such reverence for fair play and civility that a casual observer could hardly tell who was rooting for whom, much less who was winning. Today, however, it is football—with its boisterous crowds and huge financial stakes—that reveals most about what the country has become. Consider: nearly half of Britain's top football clubs are now owned by foreigners. Most of the best players are likewise foreign. In some ways, the most emblematic of the modern clubs is now London's Chelsea—or Chelski, as it's called, in a wry homage to its Russian-billionaire owner—famous for being the first big British club to field a starting lineup composed entirely of non-Britons.As this suggests, Britain is changing fast—off the football pitch as well as on it. Having absorbed the end of empire and the collapse of its industrial base...
  • Supplying Abu Dhabi's Labor

    Amid the opulent hotels and glittering high-rises of Dubai and Abu Dhabi, it’s easy to forget that the U.A.E. has a working class. With the arrival of the Guggenheim and the Louvre, demand for construction and service industry workers looks set to rise. Where will these workers come from? NEWSWEEK’s Katie Connolly asked Sarah Leah Whitson, Human Rights Watch’s executive director for the Middle East and North Africa. Excerpts: ...
  • Johnson: Onscene at Congo Gorilla Killings

    On July 23, rangers at Virunga National Park of the Democratic Republic of the Congo made a gruesome discovery. Four endangered mountain gorillas had been slaughtered, for reasons unknown, leaving two infants orphaned. The killings are signficant because the world­ wide population of mountain gorillas only numbers around 700.Richard Leakey is the founder of Wildlife Direct, a European Union-funded conservation organization based in Kenya and the Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC), works to protect the apes in Virunga park. A renowned paleontologist, Leakey’s tough antipoaching measures are credited with putting an end to the elephant slaughter in Kenya in the 1980s. He spoke by phone from Kenya to NEWSWEEK’s Scott Johnson about the recent slaughter of some of the endangered animals, the threat posed by the charcoal industry and what the international community needs to do next. Excerpts: ...
  • Profile: The Arab Sheik

    He wears a long, flowing thobe and a white headscarf and smells faintly of oud, an ancient Arabian perfume. With his trim beard and loose sandals, he looks much as his ancestors might have nearly two centuries ago when they took over this tiny fishing village on the shores of the Persian Gulf. But Sheik Mohammed bin Rashid al-Maktum, the ruler of Dubai and the prime minister of the United Arab Emirates, is a thoroughly modern prince. From his offices on the 44th floor of a sleek steel-and-glass skyscraper, he juggles nonstop cell-phone calls and dashes off salvos of quick-fingered text messages. "Sorry," he says with a wan smile to a visiting reporter. "It's a very busy time."Indeed. Dubai is one of the fastest-growing cities on the planet—a bustling trade, services, tourism and financial hub for the Middle East and Asia, and increasingly even Europe. Its economy is expanding at about 16 percent a year, roughly double that of sizzling China. Business people and multinational...
  • Benazir Bhutto Negotiates a Return to Pakistan's Politics

    Pervez Musharraf, Pakistan’s president and strongman, met his nemesis, the opposition leader Benazir Bhutto, in Abu Dhabi on July 27. Only extraordinary political circumstances could have thrown these two together. Musharraf sees Bhutto—a former prime minister who’s lived in exile since the general brought corruption charges against her—as emblematic of all that’s wrong with Pakistan’s inept and graft-ridden political parties. Bhutto, for her part, sees him as yet another military usurper, like the one who had her father—then Prime Minister Zulfiqar Ali Bhutto—hanged in 1979.The sad fact is they’re both right. So what explains the possible union of these antagonists? The answer is simple: power. Musharraf wants to retain his; Bhutto wants to get hers back. But their underlying differences remain profound, and the dangers great. While Western leaders hope a deal between them will help calm Pakistan, the truth is it probably won't.The Bhutto and Musharraf camps have been holding...
  • Q&A: The Guggenheim's Thomas Krens on Saadiyat

    The Guggenheim was one of the original inspirations for the development of Saadiyat Island in Abu Dhabi. In 1997 the museum opened a branch, designed by architect Frank Gehry, in Bilbao, Spain—in the war-scarred and economically depressed Basque country. Since then, the museum has drawn more than 9 million visitors and helped create more than 4,300 new jobs a year, contributing a total so far of $2 billion to Spain’s GDP. To replicate this success, the Abu Dhabi Tourism Authority (ADTA) hired the California design group Gensler, as well as the architectural firm Skidmore, Owings & Merrill, and lined up the Louvre in Paris. Then they approached Thomas Krens, director of the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation. Krens was not impressed with the Gensler master plan, but he ultimately decided to help Abu Dhabi expand its ambitions. Krens spoke with NEWSWEEK’s Zvika Krieger about the project. Excerpts: ...
  • Recycling Hot Air

    We all know it's possible to save energy by recycling waste, but it's also possible to recycle waste energy. Physicists at the University of Utah have found a novel way to do it—by first turning waste heat into sound, and then turning the sound into electricity. They developed a cylindrical "heat engine" that soaks up the heat and pushes it to one end of the cylinder. Once it reaches a certain temperature threshold, it passes through a valve, which makes the air vibrate (much like a flute). From there, it's a simple matter to make electricity by passing the sound through a "piezoelectric" device, which converts pressure into current. Orest Symko, a physicist leading the effort, says it holds promise for a cheap method of harnessing solar energy, as a portable energy source for electronics and ultimately as a way to generate electricity from waste heat released from power-plant cooling towers.
  • The Future of Theater Is Digital

    To watch a play is to step into a world that seems far removed from electronic bleeping and ringing—assuming, of course, that theatergoers remember to turn off their cell phones. At the Goyang Digital Theater on the outskirts of Seoul, however, managers have been imploring the audience to leave their phones on. During the performance, everybody is expected to whip out their mobiles, call into a computer and, using their keypads, direct the movement of puzzle pieces on the screen behind the stage. At some point, an ordinary housewife appears on the screen, connected from her kitchen via the Internet, and interacts with actors on the stage in real time.These are some of the innovative features introduced in "Synthasia," an experimental play this summer at Goyang. The 50-minute production combines the latest digital technology with live actors, audiences and the stage. It's being billed as the first digital play to be shown in a theater. True or not, the play is a groundbreaking effort...
  • Redemption Games

    For Gazans who want to escape the territory's political tensions, there are few boltholes. And video games aren't always the answer.
  • Gideon Rose: Don't Worry, Be Happy

    There is an odd disconnect these days between popular perceptions of international relations and the actual state of affairs. Americans increasingly see the world as a source of threats, worrying about terrorism, nuclear proliferation or immigration. Non-Americans, meanwhile, see the United States itself as a dangerous rogue bent on imperial adventures.Neither view is quite right: the United States profits far more from its engagement with the world than its citizens recognize. And it's far more benevolent than outsiders think. Aside from managing the endgame in Iraq, therefore, the greatest foreign-policy challenge facing President George W. Bush in the next 18 months—and the toughest job his successor will confront—will be how to convince everyone else that things really aren't that bad, and that desperate measures to change course would be unnecessary and unwise."Naive claptrap," many will respond. Don't I understand that radical Islamist terrorism is a grave and continuing...
  • Zakaria: A Way Out of Our Oil Addiction

    Amory B. Lovins talks big. He proposes to wean America off oil by the 2040s, touts ultralight cars and tells some of the most powerful corporate executives in the world, like those at Wal-Mart and Texas Instruments, how to behave more efficiently. But perhaps a former Oxford don—one who built a nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometer in his basement during high school, anticipated global warming in 1976 and lives in a house that can run on the same amount of energy as a conventional light bulb—is allowed to be bold. In the first of a series of conversations with thinkers and executives about the future of energy, NEWSWEEK's Fareed Zakaria spoke to the Rocky Mountain Institute's cofounder and chairman to see how this optimist makes sense of the world's energy woes. Excerpts: ...