Watch: How the U.S.-China Relationship Has Changed Over the Years

In a tweet just hours after China and the U.S. announced a meeting between President Donald Trump and Chinese Premier Xi Jinping, Trump predicted that he expected it to be “very difficult.”

Xi Jinping meets Trump for the first time at his Florida resort of Mar-a-Lago for two days of meetings,with a range of difficult points up for discussion—including North Korea, trade deals, and the South China Sea shipping access. They'll also be discussing climate change, renewable energy, and THAAD, the controversial missile defence system China claims America has trained on Beijing.

Growing pressure on China from Trump could result in a heated discussion, but Steve Tsang, head of the China department at SOAS University institute, told Newsweek that the last thing China wants is a meeting with Trump like the one he had with Merkel. Experts have noted a possible clash in personalities. Trump has been described as “on a collision course with China” on numerous occasions according to a group report published by a symposium of China experts, Task Force of U.S. - China relations.

China’s relationship with the United States has fluctuated since the start of Donald Trump’s election campaign. During his campaign Trump accused China of ‘raping our country’ and described China as “bad China” in his election manifesto, while ongoing tweets show Trump’s frustration with the global superpower. Since Trump’s election, he has exchanged — publicly at least — one letter and one phone call with the Chinese leader.

The relationship between Beijing and Washington has evolved considerably over the years—but as Tsang says, “this is still the single most important bilateral relationship in the world. They have to work together in a constructive way otherwise the world will face a crisis that none of us would want ever to materialize.” Watch the video above to see how relations have changed, from Nixon to Trump.