19 Jobs that Pay More Than $70,000 a Year and Don't Require a College Degree

While college may be the traditional path to securing a steady, high-paying job, it is certainly not the only route to a good salary. For those who long to escape the world of academia after high school graduation, there are a number of options offering more than $70,000 a year—provided you're willing to master the technical skills or on-the-job training needed to get hired.

To help job seekers get started in the right direction, Newsweek, using data from the Bureau of Labor Statistics, has identified every occupation that pays workers more than $70,000 a year and does not require any advanced educational degree, such as an Associate's or Bachelor's. That's nearly double the typical $38,844 earned a year by U.S. workers with a high school degree only and roughly on par with the median $71,864 annual salary that people with at least a Bachelor's degree bring home.

You can't expect to just walk into any of these roles tomorrow, though. Nearly all of the jobs on the list require training, certifications, lengthy internships, or, at the least, a couple years work experience in the same industry.

The extra time and labor dedicated to landing one of these gigs will be well worth it, though: In the end, you'll likely be drastically out-earning your peers with a similar level of education, and, possibly, even those who went to college and earned a four-year degree.

Consider one of these 19 occupations, listed in order of the typical salary (from lowest to highest) if you want to earn good money without attending college first.

gas plant worker
Worker at a gas plant. Zorandimzr/Getty

Gas Plant Operator

This role involves distributing and processing gas, typically for utility companies, by controlling pressure on main pipelines.

Median pay: $70,710
Number of people employed nationwide: 14,700
Expected job growth through 2029: –6%
Training required: High school diploma and long-term on-the-job training.

farmer in field
A man inspects the soybean crop in an agricultural field. Rafa Press/Getty

Farmer, Rancher, Agricultural Manager

Like working the land or with animals? In this job, you'll be running establishments that produce crops, livestock or dairy products.

Median pay: $71,160
Number of people employed nationwide: 952,300
Expected job growth through 2029: –6%
Training required: At least a high school diploma and work experience in a related occupation. Some employers may want credentials such as the Accredited Farm Manager (AFM) designation from The American Society of Farm Managers and Rural Appraisers.

police officer
Policeman working on computer inside his car. Thinkstock/Getty

Transit and Railroad Police Officer

These are officers who specifically patrol train yards and transportation hubs.

Median pay: $71,820
Number of people employed nationwide: 4,500
Expected job growth through 2029: 4%
Training required: At least a high school diploma and typically attendance of a training academy to become an officer.

Electrical power-line installer
Electrical power-line installer working with protective workwear, hardhat and safety harness. ShinyFamily/Getty

Electrical Power-Line Installers or Repairer

These workers install and maintain the network of power lines that move electricity from a generating plant to a home or building.

Median pay: $73,460
Number of people employed nationwide: 115,000
Expected job growth through 2029: 2%
Training required: High school diploma, typically completion of an apprenticeship or other employer training program, which can last up to three years, and several years of on-the-job training. Some employers may also want certifications from associations such as BICSI or the Electrical Training Alliance.

stage lighting worker
The lighting engineer adjusts the lights on the stage. Nagaiets/Getty

Lighting Technician, Media Communication Equipment Worker

Commonly found in the movie industry or in radio and television broadcasting, these workers install, maintain and repair audio and visual systems.

Median pay: $73,460
Number of people employed nationwide: 26,600
Expected job growth through 2029: 5%
Training required: High school diploma and short-term on-the-job training.

welder train rail
A person using a cutting torch to cut a train rail. mrak_hr/Getty

Signal and Track Switch Repairer

These workers install and maintain the many electrical systems and signals that keep railroads operating.

Median pay: $73,890
Number of people employed nationwide: 6,600
Expected job growth through 2029: –1%
Training required: High school diploma and moderate-term on-the-job training.

Worker adjusting gauge oil refinery
Worker adjusting gauge at oil refinery. Zorandimzr/Getty

Petroleum Pump System Operator, Refinery Operator, Gauger

In this role, you'll operate and control petroleum refining or processing units.

Median pay: $74,180
Number of people employed nationwide: 41,300
Expected job growth through 2029: 0%
Training required: High school diploma and moderate-term on-the-job training.

manager
Supervisor showing a document to a colleague. MangoStar_Studio/Getty

First-Line Supervisor of Non-Retail Sales Workers

This role involves managing sales workers outside of the retail world and typically involves budgeting, accounting and personnel work.

Median pay: $74,760
Number of people employed nationwide: 409,800
Expected job growth through 2029: -8%
Training required: High school diploma and few years of work experience in a related occupation.

casino worker
Croupier holds poker cards in his hands at a table in a casino Lacheev/Getty

Gambling Manager

These supervisors oversee the gaming operations and personnel inside a casino or other gaming establishment.

Median pay: $74,970
Number of people employed nationwide: 5,100
Expected job growth through 2029: 9%
Training required: High school diploma, several years of experience working in a casino or in a related hospitality occupation, and may need to be licensed by a state regulatory agency.

dock worker
Worker inspects cargo delivered to commercial dock. BulentBARIS/Getty

Transportation Inspector

Otherwise known as freight inspectors or rail inspectors, these workers examine equipment or goods to ensure the safe transport of cargo or people.

Median pay: $75,820
Number of people employed nationwide: 30,200
Expected job growth through 2029: 2%
Training required: High school diploma and moderate-term on-the-job training.

postal worker
A worker sorts mail at a post office. Comstock/Getty

Postmaster, Mail Superintendent

These managers oversee the services of a U.S. post office branch.

Median pay: $76,900
Number of people employed nationwide: 13,400
Expected job growth through 2029: -22%
Training required: High school diploma, few years work experience in a related occupation, and moderate-term on-the-job training.

power plant operator
Power plant worker in working clothes checking a switch. Dusanpetkovic/Getty

Power Plant Operator

In this role, you'll operate and maintain machinery used to generate electricity.

Median pay: $81,990
Number of people employed nationwide: 35,300
Expected job growth through 2029: –15%
Training required: at least a high school diploma, long-term on-the-job training, and, depending on the situation, may also need to be licensed as engineers or firefighters by state licensing boards or certified through the North American Electric Reliability Corporation's System Operator Certification Program.

criminal investigator detective
Detective studying a crime scene and taking photographs. zZrandimzr/Getty

Detective, Criminal Investigator

These police officers specialize in gathering facts and collecting evidence, typically to solve serious criminal cases, such assaults, robberies and homicides.

Median pay: $83,170
Number of people employed nationwide: 113,500
Expected job growth through 2029: 1%
Training required: At least a high school diploma, typically attendance of a training academy to become an officer, and previous work experience in law enforcement.

elevator repair
Specialist fixing lift mechanism in elevator shaft. Kyryl Gorlov/Getty

Elevator and Escalator Installer and Repairer

As the title suggests, these workers install and fix elevators, escalators, moving walkways and other lifts.

Median pay: $84,990
Number of people employed nationwide: 28,900
Expected job growth through 2029: 7%
Training required: High school diploma, typically a four-year apprenticeship program sponsored by a union, industry association or employer with technical instruction and on-the-job training, as well as, in most states, a license to operate. Some employers may also mandate certain certifications, such as: Certified Elevator Technicians (CET) or Certified Accessibility and Private Residence Lift Technicians (CAT) through the National Association of Elevator Contractors or Qualified Elevator Inspectors (QEI) through the National Association of Elevator Safety Authorities International.

commercial pilot
A man sits in an airplane cabin and flies a plane. Harbucks/Getty

Commercial Pilot

These aircraft workers don't operate on fixed schedules the way airline pilots do, and can fly charter flights, do aerial tours, transport corporate executives or help distribute agricultural chemicals.

Median pay: $86,080
Number of people employed nationwide: 41,600
Expected job growth through 2029: 9%
Training required: High school diploma, commercial pilot's license, flight training with independent FAA-certified flight instructors or at schools that offer flight training, and on-the-job training in accordance with Federal Aviation Regulations.

power plant worker
Worker in a power plant using computer to monitor equipment. Kinwun/Getty

Power Distributor and Dispatcher

This job centers on controlling the flow of electricity as it travels from generating stations to substations and then to customers.

Median pay: $90,700
Number of people employed nationwide: 11,200
Expected job growth through 2029: –8%
Training required: at least a high school diploma, long-term on-the-job training and, depending on the situation, may also need to be certified through the North American Electric Reliability Corporation's System Operator Certification Program.

police officer
Police officer handles reporter questions as a person is arrested in their home. Digital Vision/Getty

First-Line Supervisor of Police and Detectives

These managers oversee and direct the actions of more junior members of a police force.

Median pay: $91,090
Number of people employed nationwide: 126,100
Expected job growth through 2029: 5%
Training required: a high school diploma, typically attendance at a training academy to become an officer, and then moderate on-the-job training and some work experience in a related occupation.

warehouse manager
A man counts merchandise in a warehouse on his tablet computer. Gorodenkoff/Getty

Transportation, Storage and Distribution Manager

Also known as logistics managers, these workers plan and direct transportation and storage activities according to a company's policies and government regulations.

Median pay: $94,560
Number of people employed nationwide: 139,400
Expected job growth through 2029: 4%
Training required: at least a high school diploma and five or more years work experience in a related occupation.

nuclear power plant worker
Worker outside power plant at night. Cofotoisme/Getty

Nuclear Power Reactor Operator

These workers control nuclear reactors, regulating how much electricity is generated.

Median pay: $100,530
Number of people employed nationwide: 5,300
Expected job growth through 2029: –36%
Training required: at least a high school diploma, typically experience working as an equipment operator or auxiliary operator, extensive on-the-job training and a license from the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission.

Note: This list reflects median pay, current employment numbers and projected job growth from 2019–2029 that is accurate as of May 2019, the most recent data available from the Bureau of Labor Statistics. Median pay of degree holders is accurate as of Jan. 17, 2020. Newsweek chose to use these figures to better align with the the year the occupation specific data was from and because changes in earnings in 2020 should be "interpreted with caution due to the pandemic-related employment declines in 2020, notably among lower-paid workers, which put upward pressure on median earnings estimates," according to the BLS.