Can a 'Beavis and Butthead' Comeback Survive Cancel Culture?

On Wednesday, Comedy Central announced that it would launch a Beavis and Butthead reboot with possible spinoffs (yes, we already know that King of the Hill is a spinoff, these are new ones.) While the two were infamous during MTV's heyday in the 90's with their immature teen attempts to have sex, have fun, and party, there's plenty of evidence to show that the two wouldn't survive in the cancel-culture of today.

Even though the two were almost always utter-failures in their attempts to meet women and party, Beavis and Butthead were almost always misogynistic, and despite being bumbling idiots who were usually harmless, there's plenty of material from the series' run that could not fly in 2020.

Even though creator Mike Judge said, "It seemed like the time was right to get stupid again," as quoted in Entertainment Weekly, there are plenty of questionable moments from the original run that say the two butt-munches couldn't make it in the cancel culture of today.

While Beavis and Butthead are often the butt of the joke in the series, the clever satire doesn't always translate to the often-teenage audience that love the series so much.

Here are five moments from the original series that couldn't work in 2020.

Beavis and Butthead
Beavis (Right) And Butt-Head From The Movie Beavis And Butt-Head Do America. Getty Images/Getty

"Frog Baseball"

While it's unsurprising that the teen boys participated in plenty of questionable behavior like gawking at women, breaking things, and consuming huge amounts of sugar, there is a line to be drawn with Beavis and Butthead's animal abuse. In the earliest short, the pair engaged in frog baseball, which is exactly what it sounds like.

While frog baseball is a good example of the violence, the two showed plenty of insensitivity towards animals throughout Beavis and Butthead's run. In the season five episode "Bad Dog," the two adopted a dog and made no attempt to catch it when it ran away. While the two search for a dog, they giggle about a dog being put down after it licks Beavis' hand.

"Spanish Fly"

This episode shows some of Beavis and Butthead's most questionable behavior. After purchasing the titular supposed aphrodisiac, Butthead tries to pour some into female classmates' lunch (albeit unsuccessfully) so the two can "have any chick [they] want." While not trying to explicitly take advantage of an unconscious woman, the attempts to do it without the classmate knowing does not sit well in the current climate. There's also vaguely homophobic jokes after a male classmate accidentally drinks it.

Coach Bradley Buzzcut

While the titular duo are often getting into mischief and are less than savory characters themselves, they occasionally are the victims of the abuse of their peers and superiors, and no character shows that better than Coach Bradley Buzzcut. Buzzcut uses completely inappropriate methods while teaching. Besides name-calling, Buzzcut also ordered Butthead one time to "kick [him] in the jimmy," which shouldn't take much imagination to figure out, and in the episode "Patsies," Buzzcut takes advantage of a school community service organization to have them wash his car while their leader is interrogating Beavis and Butthead in detention.

Slut-Shaming

Even though Beavis and Butthead spend most of their time trying to get laid, which leads to questionable behavior, the episode "Sexual Harassment" features one of the pair's most questionable endeavors. After learning about sexual harassment, the two accuse a female classmate of sexually harassing them. Despite Beavis and Butthead being the ones doing the sexual harassing, the two go so far as to call a lawyer and try to sue the girl for wearing revealing clothing at school. Despite being something of a clever satire, the pair slut-shaming the girl in their class is incredibly sexist.

Beavis and Butthead's Treatment of Women in General

It's hard to avoid an episode of Beavis and Butthead, without the two saying something derogatory or offensive towards women or outright sexually harassing them. While the two usually come up short in their attempts at "scoring chicks," both of their behaviors are incredibly inappropriate. In the episode "Womyn," the two go to a women's rights meeting because they think they'll get to have sex with the women. Butthead outright asks a woman if she wants to "get it on." Other sexually harassing behavior includes Beavis dropping a pencil to try to see up a girl's skirt in the "Whiplash" episode, and Butthead asking a woman if she would "care for a weiner," offering her a hot dog during the "Another Friday Night" episode.

Can a 'Beavis and Butthead' Comeback Survive Cancel Culture? | Culture