880 Lb. White Shark 'Freya' Swimming off N.J., R.I. Coast

A nearly 900-pound shark has been making her way up the East Coast, swimming in the waters off New Jersey and Rhode Island.

Freya, an 11-foot, 883-pound female white shark, was last spotted Monday night near Rhode Island Sound.

Her movements have been tracked by OCEARCH, a nonprofit organization helping scientists collect data in the ocean. The group tagged Freya in late March and has followed her up the shoreline from Onslow Bay, N.C.

Along the way, Freya's been spotted in the ocean along Delaware Bay, Atlantic City and Long Island. Over the course of 54 days, the sub-adult shark has travelled 1,080 miles—more than 100 of which were travelled over the past 72 hours.

"Like many white sharks, Freya is continuing her way North! She is currently in the Block Island sound, likely still chasing menhaden. We've seen some of our sharks come to this area in the past," OCEARCH tweeted on Monday.

Like many white sharks, Freya is continuing her way North! She is currently in the Block Island sound, likely still chasing Menhaden. We've seen some of our sharks come to this area in the past.

Track her movements and study alongside our science team: https://t.co/0AwJIuFQeM pic.twitter.com/aMtIMrps5u

— OCEARCH (@OCEARCH) June 21, 2021

The group has explained on its Twitter page that menhaden are an important "forage fish that help balance the coastal marine ecosystem." The abundance of the fish around New Jersey and New York are part of the reason why white sharks gravitate to the region to drop off their pups.

"It is something to celebrate. Our oceans in this region are rebounding after many years of conservation efforts by many organizations and continuing this trend will deliver an ocean full of life to future generations," Chris Fischer, OCEARCH's founder, said in a statement.

880 Lb Shark 'Freya' Spotted NJ, RI
A nearly 900-pound shark has been making her up the East Coast, swimming in the waters off New Jersey and Rhode Island. In this photo, warning signs for shark sightings are seen in Long Beach, California, on May 16, 2017. Frederick J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images

According to OCEARCH, Freya's name translates to "Noble Woman." The shark was named by the organization's partner, Sea World.

"Freya was named in homage to the noble women researchers on both Expedition Carolinas and on all past research expeditions who are working to uncover crucial shark insights related to their species' conservation," OCEARCH said on its website.

Newsweek has reached out to OCEARCH for additional comment on Freya, but did not receive a response before publication.

Last week, two New York fishermen caught a 425-pound shark 20 miles off of Great Kills Harbor. The fisherman identified the catch as a "thresher" shark, which are considered to be a highly vulnerable species.

In New Jersey, a group of sport fishermen recently caught a young great white shark by accident. The captain of the boat estimated the shark was 7 feet long and 110 pounds. The crew caught the shark near the mouth and was able to safely let it go.

The great white shark, known as Carcharodon carcharias, has been protected in American Atlantic waters since 1997.