Alabama Man Accused of Creating 'Attack Squirrel' by Giving it Meth Taunts Police by Releasing Video Featuring Rodent

A man who is accused of keeping an "attack squirrel" locked in cage and feeding it methamphetamine so it stays aggressive has appeared on video denying the allegations while holding what he claims is the same animal.

Mickey Paulk, 35, is wanted on suspicion of possession of a controlled substance, certain persons forbidden to possess a firearm and possession of drug paraphernalia after officers searched an address in Athens, Alabama, reported the News Courier.

Limestone County Sheriff's Office spokesman Stephen Young said prior to the search, officers were made aware that Paulk was keeping a so-called "attack squirrel" inside the apartment that he fed with meth to ensure it remains aggressive.

Officers found the squirrel inside a cage and released it back into a nearby wooded area following advice from state conservation officials

"There was no safe way to test the squirrel for meth," Sheriff Mike Blakely's office said in a statement, reports AL.com.

Paulk was not present at the address at the time of the search. Another man who was inside the apartment, 37-year-old Ronnie Reynolds of Ardmore, was charged with possession of a controlled substance, possession of drug paraphernalia and loitering at a known drug house.

While still evading law enforcement officials, Paulk posted a video on Facebook in which he denied the allegations against him.

"You can't give squirrels meth, it would kill them," Paulk said. "I'm pretty sure, I've never tried it. When a police officer just decides they are gonna say whatever… people tend to go with that."

During the clip, Paulk pulls out and begins stroking a squirrel, which he claims is the same one officers released back into the wild from the apartment in Athens.

"He's just a baby, he's only 10 and a half months old. He is an a**hole, he's a mean mother****r, there's no doubt about it, but he's not a 'trained attack squirrel' and he's not on meth, I'm pretty sure.

"The squirrel is safe. The public isn't in danger from any kind of methed-out squirrel in the neighborhood, anything like that."

Paulk also claimed he longer lives at the apartment which police searched and questioned how he can face possession charges when he was not present when officers found the drugs and firearms.

Deputies said the suspect could also face charges of keeping a wild animal as a pet from the Alabama Game & Fish department.

meth squirrel
It is unclear if the squirrel seen in Mickey Paulk's video is the same one released by deputies. Mickey Paulk,/Facebook
Alabama Man Accused of Creating 'Attack Squirrel' by Giving it Meth Taunts Police by Releasing Video Featuring Rodent | U.S.
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