Alex Morgan, Seth Rogen and Many More Vocalize Support for Sha'Carri Richardson

On Friday, it was announced that American sprinter Sha'Carri Richardson would not be able to compete in her signature 100-meter sprint in the upcoming Tokyo Olympics after testing positive for cannabis. The U.S Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) announced in a statement that Richardson accepted a one-month suspension for the positive test results, which retroactively started on June 28. Though she could still compete in the relay event, many have flooded the internet in support of Richardson, denouncing the USADA's decision to bar her from competing in her solo event.

Richardson apologized in an on-air interview with TODAY.

"I want to take responsibility for my actions," she said in the interview. "I'm not looking for an excuse." Richardson revealed that her mother died while she was in Oregon competing at the Olympic trials. She stated that her mother's death put her into a state of "emotional panic," which was further compounded by the pressure of competing on the world stage.

As a result of the news, many took to Twitter to vocalize their support for Richardson, including big names like U.S. Women's Soccer player Alex Morgan and actor Seth Rogen.

New Jersey Senator Cory Booker tweeted that Richardson's suspension "over a substance that should be legal across the country is devastating and wrong."

Sha’Carri is an incredible athlete with a bright future. That her dreams are being crushed over a substance that should be legal across the country is devastating and wrong. Her heartfelt apology shows her strength even in the face of adversity.https://t.co/PeohD20Emo

— Cory Booker (@CoryBooker) July 2, 2021

"So let me get this straight," tweeted former Secretary of Labor Robert Reich. "The cannabis industry is projected to rake in $70 billion by 2028, but thousands of people are behind bars for cannabis charges, and Sha'Carri Richardson is suspended from the Olympics for using it?"

So let me get this straight: the cannabis industry is projected to rake in $70 billion by 2028, but thousands of people are behind bars for cannabis charges, and Sha’Carri Richardson is suspended from the Olympics for using it?

— Robert Reich (@RBReich) July 2, 2021

"Sickened" by her suspension, YouTuber Jake Paul also took to Twitter to vocalize his support. "If you sell cannabis in the U.S. you're considered an 'entrepreneur' but if you use it you are condemned," Paul tweeted. "This is a 21-year-old woman who is an American super-star and inspiration to so many ... she lost her mother just weeks ago and now they're cutting her out of the [O]lympics and crushing her dreams ..."

This Sha’Carri Richardson situation is sickening… pic.twitter.com/cQuZy949z7

— Paul Paul (@jakepaul) July 2, 2021

Actor Seth Rogen argued that "the notion that weed is a problematic 'drug' is rooted in racism," saying further that "it's insane that Team USA would disqualify one of the country's most talented athletes over thinking that's rooted in hatred."

The notion that weed is a problematic “drug” is rooted in racism. It’s insane that Team USA would disqualify one of this country’s most talented athletes over thinking that’s rooted in hatred. It’s something they should be ashamed of. Also if weed made you fast, I’d be FloJo. https://t.co/swDLNoVcV3

— Seth Rogen (@Sethrogen) July 2, 2021

Elle Duncan, a sports anchor for ESPN, "hated" that it took the suspension of Richardson to "spark more [conversation] surrounding pain management and mental health for athletes." She further argued that rules should change regarding marijuana.

Olympic gold medalist and U.S. soccer player Sydney Leroux agreed with Duncan, saying: "We need to look at what athletes are being given to deal with the mental and physical demands of their sport. If Xanax and opioids are legal, then marijuana should be too."

I completely agree. I feel for @itskerrii. We need to look at what athletes are being given to deal with the mental and physical demands of their sport. If Xanax and opioids are legal, then marijuana should be too. https://t.co/hnRBSwJT4X

— Sydney Leroux (@sydneyleroux) July 2, 2021

U.S. Women's Soccer player Alex Morgan said simply: "Feeling so terrible for [Sha'Carri Richardson] right now. Just know, we are with you!!"

Feeling so terrible for @itskerrii right now. Just know, we are with you!!

— Alex Morgan (@alexmorgan13) July 2, 2021

Throughout the day Friday, various phrases were trending in relation to Richardson's suspension. "She's 21" was used by many supporters urging others to reflect on their own decisions at 21.

Author and podcast host Luvvie Ajayi tweeted: "Sha'Carri's mother died a week before [the] biggest race of her life. If smoking weed is all she did to cope, she's doing better than most would. If you're chastising her, remember decisions you made at 21. Some of you forgot we knew you in college and you were a complete dumpster fire."

Sha'Carri's mother died a week before biggest race of her life. If smoking weed is all she did to cope, she's doing better than most would. If you're chastising her, remember decisions you made at 21. Some of you forgot we knew you in college and you were a complete dumpster fire

— Luvvie is the #ProfessionalTroublemaker (@Luvvie) July 2, 2021

Later in the day, The Onion started trending after writing a satirical headline on the matter that many felt to be shockingly accurate. The headline reads: "Dream Crushed Over Trivial Bulls**t Represents Nation Better Than Gold Medal Ever Could."

Dr. Ryan Marino shared that he "missed when The Onion was satire."

"I know it's the Onion ... but this is the truth," said another commenter.

Avengers star Chris Evans quote tweeted the article from The Onion with one simple emoji: a bullseye.

🎯 https://t.co/YwEZHery4X

— Chris Evans (@ChrisEvans) July 2, 2021
Sha'Carri Richardson
Sen. Cory Booker and YouTuber Jake Paul, among many other big names, took to Twitter Friday to vocalize their support for sprinter Sha'Carri Richardson in light of her Olympic suspension. Here, Sha'Carri is pictured during a meet. Patrick Smith / Staff/Getty